Author Topic: Transistors - die pictures  (Read 21069 times)

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Offline Noopy

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #250 on: December 01, 2020, 07:46:50 pm »
Next "merchandise project" is a LTZ1000 coffee pot.  :D

Done: https://www.redbubble.com/de/i/tasse/Referenzspannungsquelle-LTZ1000-von-Richis-Lab/63614214.9Q0AD  8)

The LTZ1000 clock looks quite interesting...  ;D
 
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Offline Noopy

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #251 on: December 05, 2020, 10:41:59 pm »
Today I have a Dual-J-FET for you, the DN1682:






It´s a Dual-J-FET witch matched transistors.




It looks like they have cut the wafer in two steps. Often hat is done to reducing damage in the active area.




A normal J-FET.
45 61 probably gives the die a unique number for matching the right parts.


More pictures here:
https://www.richis-lab.de/FET06.htm

 :-/O
 
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Offline SilverSolder

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #252 on: December 06, 2020, 12:37:27 am »
What's the purpose of the black goo around the dies?
 

Offline T3sl4co1l

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #253 on: December 06, 2020, 06:36:32 am »
Weird, it's common-gate?

Wait... are those not actually the can?  And if they were, there wouldn't be any need for epoxy in the bottom.  Could those be... gate pins, coined flat for mounting the dies on?  Then the epoxy underfill is not so much to insulate (the hermetic seal should be fine) as to control vibration (so it's cemented down).

Hm, is the can floating, then?

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Offline Noopy

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #254 on: December 06, 2020, 07:22:02 am »
What's the purpose of the black goo around the dies?

It hold´s everything together. The black potting holds the pins in place.



Weird, it's common-gate?

Wait... are those not actually the can?  And if they were, there wouldn't be any need for epoxy in the bottom.  Could those be... gate pins, coined flat for mounting the dies on?  Then the epoxy underfill is not so much to insulate (the hermetic seal should be fine) as to control vibration (so it's cemented down).

Hm, is the can floating, then?

There are seven pins: 2x Gate-Drain-Source and one for the can so you can connect the can to whatever you want.
The flattened pins are the gate pins and are connected with a bondwire to the edge bondpad.

 :)
 
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Offline David Hess

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #255 on: December 06, 2020, 09:04:39 am »
Weird, it's common-gate?

The connection to the gate is through the bottom of the die, so the die has to be insulated from the can.  Hybrid construction would take advantage of this to have only two wire bond connections on the top.
 

Offline exe

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #256 on: December 06, 2020, 11:35:38 am »
Today I have a Dual-J-FET for you, the DN1682

I'm surprised, I expected to see two weirdly-interleaved fets on a single die.
 
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Offline Noopy

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #257 on: December 06, 2020, 11:40:00 am »
I'm surprised, I expected to see two weirdly-interleaved fets on a single die.

That depends on what you want: Here the thermal coupling is worse but the capacitive and resistive coupling is much less than with one die.
 
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Offline Noopy

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #258 on: December 06, 2020, 07:26:33 pm »


Do you know "Elektronska Industrija"? It was an Yugoslavian company and they also built a 2N3055.  :-+ ;D




The transistor is remarkable similar to one generation of the the RCA 2N3055: https://www.richis-lab.de/2N3055_05.htm




There is some fiber glued to the die.  ???




An of course it´s glowing!  ;D
The breakdown voltage of the base-emitter-junction is quite high (-17V) because of the hometaxial construction.
Even with 1A there are some parts still dark due to the inhomogeneous structures.


More pictures here:
https://www.richis-lab.de/2N3055_13.htm

 :-/O
 
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Offline exe

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #259 on: December 06, 2020, 09:02:39 pm »
Wow, I didn't know 3055 were so popular. So many companies were producing them...
 

Offline serg-el

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #260 on: December 06, 2020, 09:39:17 pm »
 

Offline exe

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #261 on: December 06, 2020, 10:02:50 pm »
btw, you reminded me that I also have a few bjts to open, and, coincidentally, I had a hacksaw at hand. How do you say I can make them glowing? :)
 

Offline Noopy

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #262 on: December 07, 2020, 04:29:11 am »
The 2N3055 was the standard power transistor and was widely used. Back in the day there were a lot of semiconductor manufacturers...  :-/O

The base-emitter-junction is glowing in breakdown. Just connect a negative voltage to the base-emitter junction. HF-transistors often break down at 6V but I had an old Siemens hometaxial first breaking down at 70V (!). Normaly you see something around 10-20V. Be sure to limit the current and you have to cool the part or be fast: 20V*1A=20W  >:D
 
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Offline exe

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #263 on: December 07, 2020, 08:16:46 am »
What is this white stuff on the crystal? How to remove it? I tried IPA, got some mild results. Will try a pcb cleaner in the evening.
 

Offline Noopy

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #264 on: December 07, 2020, 08:59:02 am »
You can find many different protection coatings. Often it's a clear coating or nothing at all.
White stuff sounds like a silicone. That's quite hard to remove. Silicone cleaner can help but doesn't dissolve the stuff. In the end you have to peel it away. A plastic screw driver or something like that can help. You have to be careful not to damage the bondwires.

Offline exe

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #265 on: December 07, 2020, 05:16:51 pm »
Here is the transistor. Probably, the best picture I could make. The camera is slow to take pictures, so at 10A it burned out faster than "shutter" was able to take picture. This picture, is, afaik, at 5A. At 10A it blinked, and then I saw little sparks on the crystal. I think voltage was about 20V, and it became hot very fast. After that it rejected glowing, and only produced some sparks and smell. Poor bjt, RIP.
 

Offline Noopy

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #266 on: December 07, 2020, 09:12:48 pm »
10A is a lot of current!  :o ;D
Sometimes I go up to 1,5A but with more current death comes fast...  >:D

Offline exe

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #267 on: December 07, 2020, 09:20:49 pm »
 

Offline Wolfgang

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #268 on: December 08, 2020, 12:12:14 am »
Noopy, what about pulsed measurements ?
 

Offline Noopy

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #269 on: December 08, 2020, 04:14:15 am »
I do manually pulsing.  :-/O  ;D
Up to know that was sufficient.

Offline Wolfgang

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #270 on: December 08, 2020, 10:59:39 am »
Maybe, but you could use a lot more current if the duration is kept really low.
And its an interesting start problem for a computerized PSU / photography project.  >:D
 

Offline exe

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #271 on: December 08, 2020, 11:19:14 am »
BTW, my power supply can do pulses, I just thought I'll be quick-enough to do it manually. I was wrong. At 10A there was really little time to do the shot. I think it was about a second or less before brightness dropped, then sparks showed up.
 

Offline magic

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #272 on: December 08, 2020, 12:04:45 pm »
power dissipation = voltage drop · current

Just saying ;)
 

Offline Noopy

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #273 on: December 08, 2020, 12:27:19 pm »
And its an interesting start problem for a computerized PSU / photography project.  >:D

Absolutely!  ;D :-+


BTW, my power supply can do pulses, I just thought I'll be quick-enough to do it manually. I was wrong. At 10A there was really little time to do the shot. I think it was about a second or less before brightness dropped, then sparks showed up.
power dissipation = voltage drop · current

200W  >:D ;D

Offline Noopy

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Re: Transistors - die pictures
« Reply #274 on: December 11, 2020, 02:31:38 pm »


The SL113 is an old Silicon-HF-Powertransistor built by Halbleiterwerk Frankfurt Oder (60V, 400mA, 40MHz).




The "datecode" KB says august 1961 but there is a catalogue that states the development was finished in 1965.




Now that´s a strange wiring...




...and the bondwire is quite close to the bottom plate.




The die is attached on a round plate which is attached to the bottom plate of the package.




The die is 2,6mm x 1,6mm.
You can spot some minor damages.




The surface of the emitter (and only the emitter) is noticeable rough. I don´t know why...  :-//




 ;D
10V 10mA




20mA




50mA
The current distribution is not very uniform.




100mA


More pictures here:

https://www.richis-lab.de/Bipolar29.htm

 :popcorn:
 
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