Electronics > Power/Renewable Energy/EV's

Electric Car Experiences

<< < (83/92) > >>

vk6zgo:

--- Quote from: SilverSolder on October 15, 2020, 09:26:41 pm ---
--- Quote from: Gyro on October 15, 2020, 08:51:31 pm ---
--- Quote from: SilverSolder on October 14, 2020, 10:08:05 pm ---It was configurable in 1960's Saabs...    the driver pulled a little lever, and it engaged or disengaged a freewheeling clutch...   unique feature, never seen it in any other car...  but very cool!

--- End quote ---

No, freewheel capability was integral to all cars fitted with optional overdrive units (extra selectable intermediate ratio epicyclic gear after the manual gearbox) back in those days - many Fords among others. They were made by Borg Warner, first developed in the 1930s and last used in a 1972 Ford model. They had a switch to enable the overdrive ratio and a mechanical lever to engage the unit (so that you could reverse!). I remember the one on my Dad's Ford Zodiac.

--- End quote ---

Saab had a special thing going on, with a freewheeling clutch.  I've had the pleasure of driving one, it is really rather unique. 

"An unusual feature of the Saab drivetrain was a 'freewheel' (overrunning clutch). This allowed the transmission to run faster than the engine, such as when decelerating, or descending a long hill." 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saab_96

If I remember correctly, the 2 stroke models had it permanently enabled, but the V4 4-stroke models definitely had it configurable with a small T-shaped handle down by the floor...

You can hear it in use in this video clip:


--- End quote ---

Such devices were "all the go" in the 1930s, but they were mostly ditched for conventional systems, due to poor reliability & concern about lack of "engine braking".

That decade was one of great automotive innovation, much of which came to nothing.

One of the 1930s Singer cars had a transmission you could use in no fewer than three modes,------ as a conventional manual, a manual with automatic clutch, & a preselector.

It also had "Startex" ignition--------if your engine stalled, it would automatically re-start.

All this, without a microprocesser in sight! (unless you were a time traveller).

SilverSolder:

--- Quote from: vk6zgo on October 16, 2020, 01:07:13 am ---[...]

Such devices were "all the go" in the 1930s, but they were mostly ditched for conventional systems, due to poor reliability & concern about lack of "engine braking".

That decade was one of great automotive innovation, much of which came to nothing.

One of the 1930s Singer cars had a transmission you could use in no fewer than three modes,------ as a conventional manual, a manual with automatic clutch, & a preselector.

It also had "Startex" ignition--------if your engine stalled, it would automatically re-start.

All this, without a microprocesser in sight! (unless you were a time traveller).

--- End quote ---

The Saab freewheeling system was put in specifically to avoid drivers using the 2-stroke engine for engine braking, which could starve it of lubrication and caused excessive wear.  Being a Saab, their system was obviously well engineered and generally reliable.  The funny thing is, when they moved on to 4-stroke engines in the later part of the 60's, they kept the free wheeling feature...  most likely because Saab drivers were used to it being there and would have considered it a retrograde step to remove it!

It is funny to study vintage cars and see all the crazy things they were trying to do back in the day.  In the early motoring epoch, there was much more variety.  Nowadays, cars have converged to a standard formula - accelerator, brake, and clutch always in the same order, most controls are similar, transmissions are very samey, etc.   

The convergence was probably mostly complete already by the 70's?

DougSpindler:
Ah the good old days of gross polluting winning would of a 2-stroke engine.  I think there’s a reason we moved on from that technology.

SilverSolder:

--- Quote from: DougSpindler on October 17, 2020, 05:14:47 am ---Ah the good old days of gross polluting winning would of a 2-stroke engine.  I think there’s a reason we moved on from that technology.

--- End quote ---

Yep, but you can't beat the sound effects!  :D

Two strokes are still used in some applications - chain saws, leaf blowers, strimmers, etc. - it's going to be hard to dislodge them from that last stronghold, nothing beats their power-to-weight ratio!

f4eru:
can you please come back to topic ?

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version