Electronics > Power & Renewable Energy

Grid Tied inverters for household use will soon be useless?

<< < (8/8)

Faringdon:
Actually, this video,
https://www.eevblog.com/2021/10/10/eevblog-1426-this-problem-can-drop-solar-output-by-20/
..at approx 7:50,  brings into question  that GTI's can possibly deliver into voltages above 253Vac.

This is above 230VAC +10%.

So this would, in fact,  kind of squash the theory that GTI's will all start cutting out when mains goes above 253V. It was also mentioned that the upper trip point may possibly  be user programmable.......so this has flummoxed me.

However, i am sure there is some  regulation somewhere which says that GTIs (at least in UK/AUS/EU) must trip out at 230 -10%,+10%?

The video does suggest that GTI's  can possibly raise the mains voltage......which doesnt bode well for GTI's in a neighbourhood where there is no big battery bank to keep the mains voltage from rising away.

Cerebus:
It's almost as if someone slept though their year 1 lectures on Kirchhoff, Thévenin and Norton.

mansaxel:
Here, all new construction 1-family houses since 1973 or so (oil crisis) are required to be 3x10mm2+10mm2 and 35A capable. Three-phase. Frankly, I'd be really cross with the power utility if my voltage was down at 265V. Hovering around 400 is more like it.   :-DD :-DD

We live close to a water tower, which has a priority power requirement, so we're very well connected, due to sharing the transformer with the water tower.

I just got a new, smart meter, same style as in Netherlands. The law here is crystal clear; the power utility owns the meter and can swap it as they see fit.

With this meter generation, the ability to measure power both ways is introduced. I can get one reading per second locally too, if I connect the right gadget. Which I will.

alexnoot:

--- Quote from: mansaxel on October 10, 2021, 05:28:16 pm ---Frankly, I'd be really cross with the power utility if my voltage was down at 265V. Hovering around 400 is more like it.   :-DD :-DD

--- End quote ---
I'm not sure if you're being serious, but the 253V mentioned is the voltage across live and neutral. Australia is a 400V country as well... At 253V L-N, the L-L voltage would be about 438V. The official voltage across Europe (and I'm guessing AU as well) is 230V +/- 10%, meaning between 207V and 253V. Obviously neither extreme is good in the long run, but that's the standard. In my neighbourhood in Norway I'm averaging about 240V, from data collected the past 90 days. My max is 249V, and the min is 236V. And there's literally no solar around here, so you can't blame that.

Also, Faringdon has a habit of starting a ton of threads with somewhat insane arguements about everything and anything. I'm still waiting for him to finish his electric vehicle charger, the one with all the safety features and expensive components removed. Meanwhile he's saying Tesla's Powerwall will fail at 10 years due to cheap capacitors. So I'm not really sure what he's on about.

mansaxel:

--- Quote from: alexnoot on October 10, 2021, 05:48:52 pm ---
--- Quote from: mansaxel on October 10, 2021, 05:28:16 pm ---Frankly, I'd be really cross with the power utility if my voltage was down at 265V. Hovering around 400 is more like it.   :-DD :-DD

--- End quote ---
I'm not sure if you're being serious,

--- End quote ---

Oh, in part, but only as far as just before starting to point fingers at the part of the world that does not give residential homes the default of three-phase mains. That is something I usually blame Edison for, and is as close to "asocial thread-hijacking" that I'll go.  ;D

Finally, I know next to nothing about electricks, but I can plainly see the errors in Faringdon's interpretation of perceived phenomena. Even with a loaded low voltage grid, the larger grid on the other side of the transformer is mostly going to be low enough impedance that local voltage surges are going to be eaten. And, coincidentally, a significant residential load in countries where people install solar is air condition, which will consume at precisely the times when solar is working at peak. I do concur that there are large local variations in this, and it is not unthinkable that problems could emerge. But a general inability to handle local production, no.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[*] Previous page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version