Electronics > Power/Renewable Energy/EV's

how do grid-tie inverters inject power back into the grid?

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tszaboo:

--- Quote from: Mjolinor on November 14, 2017, 11:30:33 am ---
It's worth remembering that the business case for distributed generation is mostly valid because distribution losses take about 17% of the electricity generated. Moving the generation to the customer location, as you do with small renewable generation, can cost 17% more but is still viable.

It would be interesting to see if the technical and non-technical losses have changed in the last ten years or so with the increase in local generators.

--- End quote ---
Since solar power accounts to only some 5% of the energy generation in the forward thinking part of the world, the benefit is maximum 5% of that 17%. AKA almost nothing.

Mjolinor:

--- Quote from: NANDBlog on November 14, 2017, 12:31:03 pm ---
--- Quote from: Mjolinor on November 14, 2017, 11:30:33 am ---
It's worth remembering that the business case for distributed generation is mostly valid because distribution losses take about 17% of the electricity generated. Moving the generation to the customer location, as you do with small renewable generation, can cost 17% more but is still viable.

It would be interesting to see if the technical and non-technical losses have changed in the last ten years or so with the increase in local generators.

--- End quote ---
Since solar power accounts to only some 5% of the energy generation in the forward thinking part of the world, the benefit is maximum 5% of that 17%. AKA almost nothing.

--- End quote ---

Hmm, well I certainly wouldn't object to that 5% being in my bank account. :)

It really is a huge amount of money. It is about what is lost in the UK through non-technical losses.

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