Electronics > Power/Renewable Energy/EV's

How to make a DIY Tesla Powerwall for $300

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EEVblog:
 :wtf:  :scared:

Wow, this is seriously bad.
No battery managment and thermal system, and he says you can just hook it up to a standard 12V/24V/48V storage inverter!
No wonder he didn't actually plug it in and use it.
 :palm:

nctnico:
Being (somewhat) involved in battery packs I can say that this is definitely not the way to construct a giant battery pack both from a safety and a prolonged cell life point of view.

kripton2035:
there is a protection system : a fuse between each cell and the positive voltage
if a battery fails, most of the times, the fuses is blown.
he explains it perhaps in another video.

wraper:

--- Quote from: kripton2035 on July 05, 2016, 02:39:56 pm ---there is a protection system : a fuse between each cell and the positive voltage
if a battery fails, most of the times, the fuses is blown.
he explains it perhaps in another video.

--- End quote ---
Which fuses? he didn't even spot weld the batteries. Soldering them directly is a big no, especially in such quantities

kripton2035:
he soldered a resistor leg between each battery and the positive pin of the pack
he measured that way the "fuse" gets blown around 5 amps, and shorted batteries draw around 6 amps when they die
in normal use each battery draws around 3 amps.
that's the method used in tesla car batteries (but not with resistors legs !, with real industrial fuses included in the battery holders)

if this works, I find it kinda clever.

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