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Electronics => Renewable Energy => Topic started by: cdev on December 06, 2018, 11:01:45 am

Title: Is this 'free energy'?
Post by: cdev on December 06, 2018, 11:01:45 am
No, of course not.

This video is about grounding..

Notice how much current is flowing, though. Why do they have to go so deep?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yg6G5VUSsWA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yg6G5VUSsWA)
Title: Re: Is this 'free energy'?
Post by: @rt on December 06, 2018, 11:24:08 am
Without having watched it, maybe the quality of Earth is crap.
Some radio stations simply can’t do it, and have to use a mesh counterpoise instead, because there is too much rock at the surface.
Title: Re: Is this 'free energy'?
Post by: cdev on December 06, 2018, 12:37:18 pm
Where I live, that definitely is the case.

It dates back to an ancient catastrophe (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/340/6135/941) that almost wiped out life on Earth.

They call it "traprock" What an appropriate name.
Title: Re: Is this 'free energy'?
Post by: @rt on December 06, 2018, 06:31:31 pm
For amateur radio or an application like that, where you know when it will be used, it’s not uncommon to simply go out and piss on the ground rod/s.
Title: Re: Is this 'free energy'?
Post by: Rerouter on December 06, 2018, 10:38:44 pm
A factory over the road from me has had a bung neutral for some years now. last I checked I have about 3 amp flowing up my ground connection from them.

Technically if you where willing to put yourself at risk, You could harvest the balancing currents as thunderstorms came overhead. not uncommon for industrial sites to have many hundreds of amps flowing between parts of site when a storm comes around.
Title: Re: Is this 'free energy'?
Post by: cdev on December 07, 2018, 02:36:21 am
Actually, I just realized that I now have a means of easily, safely, non- invasively measuring how much current is on my two existing AC service entrance ground rods now, my UT210E clamp meter.

(But I don't mean connecting it to neutral. I just mean measuring if anything is flowing in the existing electrician installed thick copper wires between the ground rods and the house grounding connection at the two entry points, by induction to the clamp meter.)

I have no idea how much current is on them, it may be nothing, it may be something. The UT-210E can measure up to 200 amps. Not too shabby. Hopefully there is nothing even remotely near that there.

We had the two 8 foot ground rods put in to bring our electric service up to date a number of years ago. One is at the electric meter, the other is on the CATV cable.

Will do it after breakfast.


For amateur radio or an application like that, where you know when it will be used, it’s not uncommon to simply go out and piss on the ground rod/s.

Don't, you could end up as the subject of one of those "Oddly Enough" stories one reads in the paper.
Title: Re: Is this 'free energy'?
Post by: Rerouter on December 07, 2018, 02:54:30 pm
Unless you have a reason not to. I would recomment measuring the current on the wire between your nuetral bar and ground bar first. Generally he will have a few tens of mA flowing. This will then give you an idea how resistive it is
Title: Re: Is this 'free energy'?
Post by: cdev on December 07, 2018, 03:06:37 pm
The ground wire that goes from the house to the outside is connected to both the electric service box and the ground rod. The other ground rod is just a few feet away and it goes to a double female coaxial connector that has a ground lug on it which grounds the CATV ingress point.

Not being an electrician, even with the non-contact current reading and the UT210e being able to handle 200A I still am not going to try something like that unless I am 100% sure its okay to do. Test the voltage, yes, with the NCV thats fine. Or the voltmeter, but not the current unless the voltage is shown to be very low. If it was 100v like in that video I'd be worried.


Unless you have a reason not to. I would recomment measuring the current on the wire between your nuetral bar and ground bar first. Generally he will have a few tens of mA flowing. This will then give you an idea how resistive it is