Author Topic: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home  (Read 7868 times)

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Offline bateau020

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #125 on: May 04, 2021, 04:44:42 am »
A number of EV chargers have options for incomer current transformers, this way they can back-down the charge current to limit the peak load. I haven't seen this done often in domestic UK installs.

Yeah, same as my heat-pump.

But do you want to bet that if both the EV charger and the heat-pump monitor the infeed current, they're going to confuse each other mightily ?

The EV charger I have here in France is connected to the communication bus of the main "meter" (well, smart meter: counter + fuse + real time stats uplink to the distributor).
It is a standard feature of my french-made charger. The charger lowers the charge current when it detects it is close to the limit. No config needed. From the bus it can read the max allowed, the present overall load, and it knows its own load. (Not that I ever needed it, as I am on 45A single phase and don't have electric heating nor a large heat pump.) That communication bus (TIC: télé-information client) has been around for a while now, it was even present on the previous non-"smart" generation, it was just upgraded a bit for the new meter.

And yes, if you have two devices that do this, they may start a fight.
 

Offline gnuarm

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #126 on: May 04, 2021, 07:37:13 pm »
I think it is important for the discussion that we all understand how much this is "per-country" due to political and technological history.

Even between the nordic countries there are huge differences, for instance in EV uptake or how much resitive heating is used, it has been almost outlawed in DK since 1973, whereas I belive it is still pretty much the norm in NO and FI (not sure about SE).
...
But yes, adding an electrical car would require 3x35A, but that is just a one-time fee here in DK, so I dont consider it a problem?

I don't agree that 35A circuits are required to charge an EV.  I charge my model X from 120V, 1.4 kW.  My situation is unusual, but nearly no one needs the full power of a 35A, 3 phase circuit (15 kW) for home EV charging.  EVs get around 4-5 mi/kWh (I'll let you convert that to km if needed).  So a 5 kW charge rate (half of the 25A supply) gives 20 miles/hr.  How much do you drive in a day?  A 12 hour overnight charge would supply 240 miles (pretty much a full charge on most EVs). 


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In any case, our eco-government is now paying a 2500€ subsidy if we dismantle working oil heating system and replace with direct electric heating; or 4000€ if replaced by air-to-water heat pump, which is what I did (haven't got my 4000€ yet, though). In any case, every air-to-water heat pump* revert to being simple direct electric heaters when the temperature drops to below around -20 to -25degC which is commonplace enough. This obviously coincides with when heating power is required the most; so now your 2.5kW input, 9kW output investment is temporarily just an expensive decoration which inputs 9kW to output 9kW.


Here systems are mostly air to air and convert to resistance heating much below freezing, say -8 °C.  That is in no small part because the systems are hit on both ends.  A heat pump pushes heat uphill.  Air to air requires more heat to be moved AND makes the hill larger.   Air to water has a constant water temperature but requires more heat to be moved, so is less impacted by the outside temperature.  By "air to water" I'm assuming you mean ground water, no?  Buried coils in the ground or even a well pumping water for cooling?


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The grid here mostly can take it no problem, but production is a big question mark, because for a some years now, Finland has been buying electrical energy from all neighbors. Gone are the days of buying from Russia and selling to Sweden. This winter, Sweden had close calls with their own supply and demand but thankfully were still able to sell us.

*) except a very few very expensive models, but even those won't have COP much over say 1.5 at such extreme temperature differential


The change is big, most homes built before 1990's use oil heating. Keeping existing, working oil-based burners as support devices for the few coldest days, still only contributing a few % to the total CO2 emission, would totally make sense. Most of the population live in areas where there are typically less than 5-10 days per winter of such low temperatures that air-source heat pumps have to rest (or work at ridiculously low COP say <1.5), but you need to design the whole infrastructure to be able to get through those days, and now suddenly we will have tens of thousands more households running with direct electric heating (so some 10kW). Which is 3x16A so you have 9A left per phase for everything else.

The coldest days are typically clear (heat radiating into space).  Residential solar can assist in those times.  Of course some sort of storage is required for night.  That's a bigger challenge.  Direct water heating is actually very effective and inexpensive.  That can be supplemented for night heating, but requires water circulation which is not so common these days.
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Offline f4eru

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #127 on: May 04, 2021, 09:32:48 pm »
I don't agree that 35A circuits are required to charge an EV.  I charge my model X from 120V, 1.4 kW.  My situation is unusual, but nearly no one needs the full power of a 35A, 3 phase circuit (15 kW) for home EV charging.
Yes exactly.
I have a 45A limit on my single phase 230V supply, and did not even consider upgrading that since 2 years of having an EV.

Charging 16A every night (3,7kW), occasionally upping it to 32A when faster charging is really needed.

In some rare cases, you can avoid the upgrade using a smart regulating EVSE or similar.

Offline uer166

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #128 on: May 05, 2021, 01:59:29 am »
I wasn't expecting to disconnect PE (though note it is now common for EV chargers to disconnect PE in the event of lost TNC-S neutral, yey for ugly workarounds).
What the.. I design EV chargers and not aware of anything like that. PE bonding is one of the tests safety agencies do when certifying the product. Can you elaborate?
 

Online fcb

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #129 on: May 05, 2021, 07:45:34 am »
I wasn't expecting to disconnect PE (though note it is now common for EV chargers to disconnect PE in the event of lost TNC-S neutral, yey for ugly workarounds).
What the.. I design EV chargers and not aware of anything like that. PE bonding is one of the tests safety agencies do when certifying the product. Can you elaborate?
UK chargers should by law protect against broken PEN.  One of the rare fault modes that can effectively leave the PE (and car body) floating, or worse still at live voltages.  Some manufacturers do this by disconnecting the L1, L2, L3, N and PE on the cable.  If you look-up the Zappi 2, you'll see an earth disconnection relay.

https://electron.plus Power Analysers, VI Signature Testers, Voltage References, Picoammeters, Curve Tracers.
 

Online Siwastaja

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #130 on: May 06, 2021, 01:00:55 pm »
Here systems are mostly air to air and convert to resistance heating much below freezing, say -8 °C.  That is in no small part because the systems are hit on both ends.  A heat pump pushes heat uphill.  Air to air requires more heat to be moved AND makes the hill larger.   Air to water has a constant water temperature but requires more heat to be moved, so is less impacted by the outside temperature.  By "air to water" I'm assuming you mean ground water, no?  Buried coils in the ground or even a well pumping water for cooling?

No, I mean air to water as in air is the source. Basically, take a bog standard air-to-air heat pump outdoor unit, but replace the indoor unit with plate heat exchanger releasing the heat to water. Why? Because now you can connect it to the existing central heating system. You can also store the heat in water easily, which is something not very trendy right now but nevertheless I'm doing that.

In air-to-water, low temperatures really hurt because unlike air-to-air where the condenser (indoor unit) has large surface area + fan and thus can keep producing fairly constant 25-26 degC air, air-to-water is usually connected to the existing radiator system which, even if generously sized, requires temperatures in excess of 45 degC so that the radiators give enough power output with natural convection. Best case, in-floor heating can work with lower water temperatures.

Pumping from -25 outdoor air to +50 central heating loop is quite a task to do; very best models can pull that off with COP near 2! But it's not worth investing 10000€ to do that if a 3000€ unit does almost the same except for the few coldest days.

Ground source is obviously ultimate in very cold climates and easy to design because the source temperature is constantly around +5 degC even in cold climates, given generous energy well sizing. Too small and it freezes though. Fairly expensive to install. Requires bureaucracy here. Typical install cost near 20k€.

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The coldest days are typically clear (heat radiating into space).  Residential solar can assist in those times. 

I have a 3kW PV system but the generation in coldest months - Jan and Feb - was exactly zero this year. You could clear the snow off the panels, yes, but the output would be still utterly minuscule, maybe in a good cold sunny day in January you'd get 3-4kWh and need 100kWh for heating that day. Now in Apr or May I get, depending of cloudiness, 20% to 60% of my heat consumption from PV, and this is with direct electric heating. With heat pump COP=3.0, this translates to 60% to 180%!

But the problem here is that Finland is an extremely dark country in winter, we have this thing called Gulf stream enabling us to somehow live here, but climatically equivalent areas in North America for example are much more down south, hence you have a lot more light there.

So it makes perfect sense to burn fossils during the two months of cold darkness and you can compensate during the remaining year.
 

Offline gnuarm

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #131 on: May 06, 2021, 01:33:39 pm »
Here systems are mostly air to air and convert to resistance heating much below freezing, say -8 °C.  That is in no small part because the systems are hit on both ends.  A heat pump pushes heat uphill.  Air to air requires more heat to be moved AND makes the hill larger.   Air to water has a constant water temperature but requires more heat to be moved, so is less impacted by the outside temperature.  By "air to water" I'm assuming you mean ground water, no?  Buried coils in the ground or even a well pumping water for cooling?

No, I mean air to water as in air is the source. Basically, take a bog standard air-to-air heat pump outdoor unit, but replace the indoor unit with plate heat exchanger releasing the heat to water. Why? Because now you can connect it to the existing central heating system. You can also store the heat in water easily, which is something not very trendy right now but nevertheless I'm doing that.

In air-to-water, low temperatures really hurt because unlike air-to-air where the condenser (indoor unit) has large surface area + fan and thus can keep producing fairly constant 25-26 degC air, air-to-water is usually connected to the existing radiator system which, even if generously sized, requires temperatures in excess of 45 degC so that the radiators give enough power output with natural convection. Best case, in-floor heating can work with lower water temperatures.

Part of the problem is a heating system that tries to generate 45 °C or worse 50 °C.  My heating system is forced air and only needs to generate about 35 °C, big difference.


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Pumping from -25 outdoor air to +50 central heating loop is quite a task to do; very best models can pull that off with COP near 2! But it's not worth investing 10000€ to do that if a 3000€ unit does almost the same except for the few coldest days.

My point is the COP falls, but it is never below 1.0, so it can keep running and the direct resistance heat can just be supplemental.


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Ground source is obviously ultimate in very cold climates and easy to design because the source temperature is constantly around +5 degC even in cold climates, given generous energy well sizing. Too small and it freezes though. Fairly expensive to install. Requires bureaucracy here. Typical install cost near 20k€.

I considered installing it at one point, but they would not give a total price.  Seems they want no risk from the cost of digging to install the ground loop.  I sent the guy packing.  I don't know how they can sell residentially without giving a firm price quote.


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The coldest days are typically clear (heat radiating into space).  Residential solar can assist in those times. 

I have a 3kW PV system but the generation in coldest months - Jan and Feb - was exactly zero this year. You could clear the snow off the panels, yes, but the output would be still utterly minuscule, maybe in a good cold sunny day in January you'd get 3-4kWh and need 100kWh for heating that day. Now in Apr or May I get, depending of cloudiness, 20% to 60% of my heat consumption from PV, and this is with direct electric heating. With heat pump COP=3.0, this translates to 60% to 180%!

3 kW is not a very large PV system at all.  Not sure how your monthly generation could be zero however.  Can you explain that a bit?  Are you saying you live somewhere that the snow on the panels never melts for 60 straight days? 


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But the problem here is that Finland is an extremely dark country in winter, we have this thing called Gulf stream enabling us to somehow live here, but climatically equivalent areas in North America for example are much more down south, hence you have a lot more light there.

So it makes perfect sense to burn fossils during the two months of cold darkness and you can compensate during the remaining year.

Not exactly.  We are very accustomed to burning fossil fuels and not giving it much thought other than that we should stop at "some point" or that we need to ''cut back" like being on a diet.  The reality is we need to STOP burning fossil fuels, end of story.  We can't do that over night, but some other energy source is required.  The fact that solar is not ideal and that we need to continue development on various non-fossil energy sources does not mean we should just accept that using fossil fuels is inevitable.  We can do better and we will... unless we treat global warming like the COVID pandemic in Florida and just accept things without taking the actions we should.

I do have to applaud you for having a PV system which I don't.  I've not been willing to cut down my trees.  Maybe I can get my neighbor, who has clear cut his property, to let me put PV on his pole barn roof! 
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Offline AndyFl

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #132 on: May 06, 2021, 11:06:10 pm »
If your local Neutral and imported earth is being significantly disturbed from the local earth (defined as an earth rod) because of phase imbalance on a long feed then you could see other issues with metalwork being at several volts above ground and possibly significant current flowing via your water and gas pipes into the ground. This is not a good situation as it might indicate a potential neutral fault which is extremely dangerous.

One solution to this would be to get your installation converted to TT  from TNCS/TNS but this has to be done carefully if you have near neighbours who are on TNCS/TNS. It won't fix your high voltage but at least everything will stay properly grounded!
 

Online Siwastaja

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #133 on: May 07, 2021, 09:53:00 am »
3 kW is not a very large PV system at all.  Not sure how your monthly generation could be zero however.  Can you explain that a bit?  Are you saying you live somewhere that the snow on the panels never melts for 60 straight days? 

Thick layer of snow for nearly three months straight. Normal here. Not every year for that long, but maybe every 3-4 years. Yes, you could remove the snow but it's not worth the hassle for maybe some 30 kWh/month generation. Later in spring, you get the same in two days.

Yes it's small, I dont't know why the previous owner cheaped out, there's room on the roof for many more panels and I'm sure the additional cost once the installers were on the premises would have been negligible. Anyway, I'm going to expand it. A 5-6kWh system, maybe up to near 10kWh now that panels are cheap, would be the sweet spot between investment cost and production. Too large and you produce excess power and need to sell it for cheap.

Here we have just to accept basically no solar generation for three months, but especially in springtime production is great and already a rather small 3kW system combined with air source heat pumping gives you almost full self sustainable energy!
« Last Edit: May 07, 2021, 09:59:16 am by Siwastaja »
 

Offline gnuarm

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #134 on: May 07, 2021, 10:30:21 am »
3 kW is not a very large PV system at all.  Not sure how your monthly generation could be zero however.  Can you explain that a bit?  Are you saying you live somewhere that the snow on the panels never melts for 60 straight days? 

Thick layer of snow for nearly three months straight. Normal here. Not every year for that long, but maybe every 3-4 years. Yes, you could remove the snow but it's not worth the hassle for maybe some 30 kWh/month generation. Later in spring, you get the same in two days.

Yes it's small, I dont't know why the previous owner cheaped out, there's room on the roof for many more panels and I'm sure the additional cost once the installers were on the premises would have been negligible. Anyway, I'm going to expand it. A 5-6kWh system, maybe up to near 10kWh now that panels are cheap, would be the sweet spot between investment cost and production. Too large and you produce excess power and need to sell it for cheap.

Here we have just to accept basically no solar generation for three months, but especially in springtime production is great and already a rather small 3kW system combined with air source heat pumping gives you almost full self sustainable energy!

Seems like both solar and heat pumps are rather marginal where you are.  How many hours of sunlight do you get on Dec 20?
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Offline richard.cs

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #135 on: May 07, 2021, 10:33:04 am »
Would you do better with vertical panels on a South facing wall, would that be enough to be self-clearing? Taking a stab at you being about 65 degrees North, this calculator puts your optimum January angle as just 9 degrees from vertical. http://www.solarelectricityhandbook.com/solar-angle-calculator.html

Using their irradiance calculator you can then work out what your expected output would be for a given array size at that angle.
http://www.solarelectricityhandbook.com/solar-irradiance.html
I think that website also uses historic weather data rather than being entirely geometry based, so should account for average cloud. It looks like you loose about 30% off the summer performance compared with roof-angled panels, but if it keeps the snow off when you need most power in winter maybe it's worth it.
 

Offline bsdphk

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #136 on: May 07, 2021, 02:25:12 pm »
Would you do better with vertical panels on a South facing wall,

If your goal is "maximize minimum daily energy" and you are in the nordic countries, vertical south facing panels is the optimum config.

I can highly recommend EU's PV estimator webapp:  https://re.jrc.ec.europa.eu/pvg_tools/en/tools.html
 

Offline richard.cs

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #137 on: May 07, 2021, 02:29:55 pm »
I can highly recommend EU's PV estimator webapp:  https://re.jrc.ec.europa.eu/pvg_tools/en/tools.html
Thanks, I wasn't aware of that one.
 

Online Siwastaja

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #138 on: May 08, 2021, 09:31:44 am »
Seems like both solar and heat pumps are rather marginal where you are.  How many hours of sunlight do you get on Dec 20?

5 hours from sunrise to sunset but obviously at such low angle that even small trees and buildings, anything not a completely flat horizon, make it 2-3 hours and that is quite low angle as well.

Last December was 3 kWh of production for the whole month. The same I produce in one hour in a sunny day at good angle. But this is because last December only had TWO even remotely sunny days. Rest was all cloudy and foggy all the time; very typical December. The combination of cloud, fog and low solar angle is the killer. Now if I have a similarly cloudy and foggy day in May, I get maybe 3-4 kWh per such day. In December it's 0. It's also depressing!

But the total yearly insolation in Finland is not bad at all, it's only marginally worse than middle Europe or northern USA for example. It's just that we get little to no production for two months, quite limited production for another two, the rest is just fine or even very good.

So yes, part of the time it's marginal, basically ROI lengthens by some 30% compared to middle Europe for example. But nowadays, ROI for solar installations is so good this isn't a problem IMHO. I'm definitely going to install more solar despite it being useless part of the year. Probably south facing at steep angle to boost winter time production as suggested by richard.cs.

Air source heat pumping isn't marginal in Southern Finland if you buy machines capable of low-temperature operation; temperatures below -20degC (down to -30degC) are reality but the number of such days per year is usually just 5-10, so just use alternative sources for those days, direct electric heating being simplest, burn wood or even untrendy oil, no big deal in total cost nor total CO2 because it's a few % of yearly energy. Air-source heat pumping works very well to about -10 to -15degC, and most of the heating energy is spent approximately in such conditions.

BTW, one of the biggest challenges in designing a cold environment air source heat pump is the defrost algorithm, in particular how the unit decides when the evaporator is blocked due to freezing and needs defrosting. Freezing itself lowers both COP and power output, but because defrosting wastes energy, false positives also totally kill the COP. If you ignore the freezing issue, designing an unit to operate with large dT is fairly trivial, just some component and refrigerant optimization engineers do all the time. But buggy defrost algorithm can totally kill an otherwise well designed pump as evidenced by recent problems in some top-of-the-line Mitsubishi Electric air-to-air heatpump models that enter endless defrost-after-defrost loop and just stop working.

Would you do better with vertical panels on a South facing wall, would that be enough to be self-clearing?

Not only self-clearing, but also in a pretty good angle for those winter days. Such installations can be seen here, it's generally a good idea if self-sustainability (i.e., energy production for oneself when it is needed) is the target. Yearly total production suffers significantly, but OTOH, does it make sense to produce excess energy in summer when everyone else is also producing in excess, and sell it for peanuts?
« Last Edit: May 08, 2021, 10:00:45 am by Siwastaja »
 

Offline gnuarm

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #139 on: May 08, 2021, 02:49:08 pm »
Would you do better with vertical panels on a South facing wall, would that be enough to be self-clearing?

Not only self-clearing, but also in a pretty good angle for those winter days. Such installations can be seen here, it's generally a good idea if self-sustainability (i.e., energy production for oneself when it is needed) is the target. Yearly total production suffers significantly, but OTOH, does it make sense to produce excess energy in summer when everyone else is also producing in excess, and sell it for peanuts?

Sounds like a problem of locality of supply/demand.  Doesn't your country share with others to the south?  I don't pretend to know the geography and climate of the region, but here most places have summer peaks of demand in the late after noon.  My Time of Use billing is 3 to 7 pm where my cost of electricity is 10x the off peak rates.  I would think that would make for excellent returns if your country had energy sharing agreements with other, more southern countries. 
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Online Siwastaja

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #140 on: May 08, 2021, 04:31:34 pm »
Sounds like a problem of locality of supply/demand.  Doesn't your country share with others to the south?

Well, right now the issue is what I think applies to basically everywhere: if you sell to the grid, you are paid less than when you buy from grid. For me, it's 0.13€/kWh to buy and 0.05€/kWh to sell. (Yes, we have cheap electricity compared to Germany for example!) There are special arrangements where you are paid the same but then need to pay some fixed monthly fee to enable that arrangement.

I was a bit futuristic with my remark. With the current trend in solar installations, my expectation is that maybe in 10 years, hourly rates are forced down our throats and during peak generation the difference between selling in summer vs. buying in winter develops even larger gap than what it currently is, the conclusion anyway being that even with the current gap in sell vs. buy prices, maybe it's a good idea to choose the slope angle for winter production (or morning/evening production) at the expense of generating less than maximum theoretical energy, but being able to use more by yourself.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2021, 04:33:22 pm by Siwastaja »
 

Offline gnuarm

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #141 on: May 08, 2021, 05:37:59 pm »
With the practicality of residential power generation, it would seem the monopolistic model of electricity sales is going to need changes.  The local utility will be needed for distribution, but the billing for the kWh consumption and generation can and should be turned into an open market. 

Again, I don't know your country's methods and in the US it varies by state and even the individual utility.  One of my homes has competitive energy supplier(s), however it was never a widely sourced market.  Prior to that the entire package was handled by the local utility.  Politicians opened up the market saying it would provide for lower prices on a competitive market.  Instead some utilities within the state spun off their power generation and someone made big money on unregulated pricing with residential bills doubling in some areas.  Another home is on a coop which means the users are also stockholders and any profits are applied to the bills.  The prices at the two homes are pretty much the same. 

Here utilities have some political clout, as does any large company, being able to pay for PR and lobbyists.  Still, as the nature of electrical generation becomes more complex, I expect the utilities to morph into less electricity suppliers and more electricity buffers and market makers.  With solar and wind generation, storage is required which may be less expensive at the utility level.  Certainly wind power is lower cost when installed with large turbines rather than home size, so that will remain a utility level source.  But solar can be mounted on homes keeping much of the generation close to the source reducing the need for external generation as well as transmission, mostly needing storage and local distribution.
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Offline bsdphk

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #142 on: May 09, 2021, 05:32:16 pm »
my expectation is that maybe in 10 years, hourly rates are forced down our throats

People usually do not realize how much history, technological and political, there is under that statement.

One of the things we found when we cleaned up after my grandparents, was an old "milking-schedule":  Each farmer was assigned a time-slot for running his milking machine, because the local power-plant was not big enough to run them all at the same time.  That was not even 100 years ago.

Then a huge consolidation took place, where AC backbone grids took that concern away and like running water, electricity became a "utility":  You just open when you need some.

If the economics of production are benign and predictable, charging for the annual consumption at the average rate, makes a lot of sense:  It gives you the lowest possible overhead costs.

But if the economics of production are unpredictable, if you have droughts or shortfall of electricity production, you cannot do that, and before you go back to issuing "milking-schedules", trying to make people think about when they consume is a good first step.

When you plan a trip into town, you consider the expected traffic[1] and you probably try to avoid the most crowded times at the shopping centre.

There is no reason why it should be any different for electricity, or for that matter, water, when drought parches California or Australia.

The crucial thing however, is that the markets must be tightly regulated, so that prices dont peak simply because som antisocial asshole can make money that way (See also: ENRON), it must be a legitimate price-signal to indicate that we would all fare better, if some people tried to shift their consumption.

Unfortunately, deregulated markets heavily favour the assholes.

[1] Full disclosure:  The few times I've been in Finland I've never seen congestion, not sure if this example applies there.
 

Offline f4eru

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #143 on: May 09, 2021, 08:53:06 pm »
But if the economics of production are unpredictable, if you have droughts or shortfall of electricity production, you cannot do that, and before you go back to issuing "milking-schedules", trying to make people think about when they consume is a good first step.
Yep. And it is a positive thing!
Forget flat-priced electricity. Producing electricity is not flat-cost! Why on earth should the supplier take the risk ?

In some countries, this already exists, and you have a few options :
- flat rate, pay more on average (like today)
- variable rate, pay a bit less on average
- variable rate, pay much less by managing your loads a bit (intelligent ones will come more and more)
- produce yourself, with PV, batteries, V2G etc...

Offline bsdphk

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #144 on: May 09, 2021, 09:00:48 pm »
Yep. And it is a positive thing!

Yes, as I said: If the market works, and governments regulate them properly, so vulnerable consumers do not get exploited at every possible turn.

We dont need another ENRON.

And Texas saw this winter what happens when the governmental regulation does not work.

 

Offline jh15

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #145 on: May 10, 2021, 03:42:17 am »
Is this still the thread about too high voltage in a home? Seems the kilt is tilted.
Tek 575 curve trcr top shape, Tek 535, Tek 465. Tek 545 Hickok clone, Tesla Model S,  Ohio Scientific c24P SBC, c-64's from club days, Giant electric bicycle, Rigol stuff, Heathkit AR-15's. Heathkit ET- 3400a trainer&interface. Starlink pizza.
 
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Online Siwastaja

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Re: Constant High Mains Voltages At Home
« Reply #146 on: May 11, 2021, 02:38:47 pm »
Is this still the thread about too high voltage in a home? Seems the kilt is tilted.

Yes it is, eyesight 20/20. Feel free to post about too high voltage in a home. If you have anything to say, that is.
 


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