Author Topic: The beginning of the end for coal  (Read 16567 times)

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Offline Marco

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Re: The beginning of the end for coal
« Reply #50 on: September 09, 2016, 12:29:45 pm »
Nuclear is the only current means to replace fossil fuel power generation on a MW for MW basis and have the availability we are used to.

If a low capital investment and running cost storage method is found which can bridge a couple days that will change for many countries, including say Australia.
 

Offline CoffinDodger

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Re: The beginning of the end for coal
« Reply #51 on: September 10, 2016, 01:37:09 am »
I want to warn first that i may have a drink in my hand while writing this.

You know what really grinds my gears?  This massive social push to renewable energy power sources while at the same time creating more electricity dependent consumer devices.  The electric car is a real frigin winner in that category too. 

Not to be hateful on it however.  I actually love the idea of electric cars if only for the effect it'll have on the development of advanced energy storage techniques, motor efficiency, and energy salvaging techniques.  Then there's the awesome torque and acceleration compared to it's petrol counterparts.  Electricity is a phenomenal and violent force. I think the only thing that may beat it are incomprehensible fluids.  You reverse power a generator and your prime mover will be annihilated.

Anyway...

But to claim it's the green way to go, while at the same time trying to move to a less efficient energy source is just hilarious. 

The real cruxe of the issue, which has been hit upon several times, is the energy consuming habits of today.  If solar energy had been pursued back before tesla as fervently as it is now i honestly think that would be the way to go.  A solar roof on every home coupled with DC appliances.  Cause honestly one of the big inefficiencies besides intermittent power production, the need for an on site storage system (which is another beast in of itself,  Lead acid people!! it's almost 100% recyclable, can be maintained and handles current draw quite well) IS!!! it produces DC which is inverted to AC for distro (whether to a grid or locally), which produces and UGLY wave form by the way.  and the real joke is electronics run on DC so it's converted BACK to DC.  Also, There's DC equivalents to most if not all of your home appliances, lights don't care and LED lighting for the home would be happier on DC as well!

So my point is.... if i had one.... is...it's ridiculous that we live in a world that wants inefficient renewable energy sources while wanting to rely on electricity as a magical source of green living. 

The second point is.  If you want to have more efficient solar power system for your home, skip the inverter and get a DC home with a lead-acid UPS OR schedule your power consumption, buy a bike, get a non electricity consuming hobby/pastime and you'll probably do alright. 
 

Offline LabSpokane

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Re: The beginning of the end for coal
« Reply #52 on: September 10, 2016, 12:53:35 pm »
If one compares the productions curves of wind and solar with the typical charging schedules for electric cars, the two become an ideal match for one another.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2016, 05:23:57 pm by LabSpokane »
 

Offline Marco

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Re: The beginning of the end for coal
« Reply #53 on: September 10, 2016, 01:20:55 pm »
If employers provide charge points and we massively upgrade the distribution networks.

It's time for MVDC.
 

Offline LabSpokane

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Re: The beginning of the end for coal
« Reply #54 on: September 10, 2016, 05:24:52 pm »
If employers provide charge points and we massively upgrade the distribution networks.

It's time for MVDC.

The network upgrade part is not so far-fetched - at least in the US. Power companies are looking for new demand.

And I totally agree with the DC part. That will improve grid stability.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2016, 05:26:24 pm by LabSpokane »
 


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