Author Topic: Aquarium chiller/compressor/fan won’t turn off/ chills and chills and chills...  (Read 4250 times)

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Offline Airwalk1616

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I can’t tell you my appreciation for your help also, btw.
 

Offline SMdude

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I just tested my transistors with my multimeter set at 2000k ohms. When i put the probes, in either polarity on the Base and Emitter, I get a reading. This means they’re bad? @james_s @SMdude

Given that the relays dont click until the light goes solid, I would say that the transistors are fine as these switch the relays??

If they were bad, either the relay would turn on immitately when power was applied, or the relay would not turn on at all.

What controls the fan?

Does the compressor only turn on once the relay clicks?
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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No, the fan and compressor both, run together constantly from the moment it’s plugged in. The chiller light, once it realizes the set temp is LOWER than the actual temp, is supposed to blink for about 2-3 mins, once it becomes solid, is THEN supposed to kick on the fan and compressor. But that’s not the case. I would think the relay controls them but I don’t think it’s actually how it works. Not sure what actually controls them?

This is the diagram for the NEWER model but I assume they’re similar?
« Last Edit: December 03, 2017, 06:54:52 am by Airwalk1616 »
 

Offline SMdude

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Ok,

One of those relays is what is meant to switch the compressor and fan on and off.
It is possible that the contacts in the relay are stuck together, however, normally when this happens, the relay doesn't click.

With everything off and disconnected, do you get continuity from the compressor/fan terminal to the AC input active terminal?

So, while the compressor is currently running and the water is colder than the turn off temperature, what is the LED doing?
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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Ok,

One of those relays is what is meant to switch the compressor and fan on and off.
It is possible that the contacts in the relay are stuck together, however, normally when this happens, the relay doesn't click.

With everything off and disconnected, do you get continuity from the compressor/fan terminal to the AC input active terminal?

So, while the compressor is currently running and the water is colder than the turn off temperature, what is the LED doing?
I’m not too sure where to test to find out if there’s continuity between the terminal and ac input terminal? Maybe you could scan my pics and help me do that?

As far as the LeD goes, if the temp is above the set temp, once I plug it in, the chilling led (led3) starts to blink like I said then becomes solid at which time the relay clicks. It will chill and chill until it hits the set temp. At this point the machine should basically shut off completely, fan and all with nothing but the yellow power light (Led1) being solidly illuminated which it is all the time as per normal.
But of course, this isn’t the case. The fan and compressor stay on and keep chilling further at which point the temperature goes 1* lower than the set target temp, (power light is all that’s on when the set temp is reached) which starts the 3min cycle of blinking of the heater light (led2). Once this has happened and it becomes solid, the relay clicks and the 2 prong outlet in the back of the unit receives power. Like I said, it’s for an EXTERNAL HEATER (which is what is written on the front panel next to the light) that would be placed in the tank at all times, to warm the water back to a higher temperature as a safe guard.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2017, 10:07:53 am by Airwalk1616 »
 

Offline SMdude

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To me it looks like the red wire is the one that supplies active to the compressor and fan and the black wire is live from the ac mains.
Disconnect the red wire and test for continuity between that terminal and the terminal that the black wire was on(assuming that the black wire is ac live)
It is really hard to tell without looking at the bottom side of the relay pcb.

I think it is worth replacing the relay for the chiller as it sounds like everything else is doing what it is meant to be doing.

Ps, disclaimer, I claim no responsibility for you doing something that is over your head and causing yourself, others or property harm.
 
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Offline Airwalk1616

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To me it looks like the red wire is the one that supplies active to the compressor and fan and the black wire is live from the ac mains.
Disconnect the red wire and test for continuity between that terminal and the terminal that the black wire was on(assuming that the black wire is ac live)
It is really hard to tell without looking at the bottom side of the relay pcb.

I think it is worth replacing the relay for the chiller as it sounds like everything else is doing what it is meant to be doing.

Ps, disclaimer, I claim no responsibility for you doing something that is over your head and causing yourself, others or property harm.
  another forum I have this question posted on, a guy suggests that I switch the blue and red wires terminals and to see if when I plug it in the compressor and fan are still on. He said that would be a good way to find out if the relays really the culprit.



"Another easy test would be to swap the red and blue wires. If the cooler doesn't start running right off when plugged back in, the cooler circuit was stuck on. The heater plug should now be hot at all times, and the cooler will only turn on if the temperature is too low, but at least it proves the culprit is just the relay. "

 Do you think I should try this? And when you say to test the black and red Wires, are you talking about the wires right on the board where they all are in a row with the little soft plastic covers? Because yes, for some stupid reasons the RED wire is cool and the BLUE wire is hot. BLACK is like you said, I’m pretty sure, the hot line in.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2017, 12:26:11 pm by Airwalk1616 »
 

Offline SMdude

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At first glance the wires looked like they are attahed with spade terminals, but I think that they might actually be directly soldered down. If they are spades, then it is easy.

Yes, swapping red and blue should do it.
And yes, the relays are there soley for switching the high voltage/current to the cooler and heater. 1 relay for the cooler, the other for the heater.

If you don't use a heater, you could get away with just swapping the heater relay in place of the cooler relay.

It would be much easier to give good advise if we had a photo of the full bottom side of the relay pcb. You are going to have to separate them anyway, so just do it!
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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At first glance the wires looked like they are attahed with spade terminals, but I think that they might actually be directly soldered down. If they are spades, then it is easy.

Yes, swapping red and blue should do it.
And yes, the relays are there soley for switching the high voltage/current to the cooler and heater. 1 relay for the cooler, the other for the heater.

If you don't use a heater, you could get away with just swapping the heater relay in place of the cooler relay.

It would be much easier to give good advise if we had a photo of the full bottom side of the relay pcb. You are going to have to separate them anyway, so just do it!
  LOL I am just scared if I remove the boards and separate them, I won’t be able to put them back together. There are four separate solder joints holding each side together. How would I heat them all up at once to remove them. Would I just have to wipe off each joint has its in a liquid state? I’m not sure if I have the correct Solder To re-apply them when I do put them back together. But with switching the relay, the same problem would persist because the Chiller would only work if the temperature was lower than the set temperature right? I’m pretty sure they’re spade though.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2017, 03:11:27 pm by Airwalk1616 »
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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At first glance the wires looked like they are attahed with spade terminals, but I think that they might actually be directly soldered down. If they are spades, then it is easy.

Yes, swapping red and blue should do it.
And yes, the relays are there soley for switching the high voltage/current to the cooler and heater. 1 relay for the cooler, the other for the heater.
 
If you don't use a heater, you could get away with just swapping the heater relay in place of the cooler relay.

It would be much easier to give good advise if we had a photo of the full bottom side of the relay pcb. You are going to have to separate them anyway, so just do it!
.  So I switch them and it seems to have worked. The fan did not turn on when I plugged it in BUT once the temperature rose above my set temperature, the chiller llight started blinking and just went solid, the fan did NOT come on. Hm? The outlet in the back IS Receiving power though. So it’s a relay problem. But why isn’t my fan and compressor turning ON now?

:edit: :):):) I turned up my temperature to make the heater light blink and once it went solid, BOOOOOOOOM BABY. Fan and compressor on. So I need a new chiller relay it is obviously stuck closed. And just like I thought, it will only chill now when the temperature is COLDER than the set temp so to engage the heater relay. Outlet in the back receiving power still. So we’re finally FINALLY to a light at the end of the tunnel.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2017, 04:00:05 pm by Airwalk1616 »
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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Hi guys I own an aquarium chiller that I’m using for my tank right now. It is an ecoplus 1/10 hp model from 2013. It is an older model that is not sold anymore and is different from the model you would see on Amazon or elsewhere today. It has worked for quite some time as I bought it from a friend but recently has started to chill well past my set temperature. I’ve done a little bit of testing With the knowledge that I have concerning the relays. There are three LED lights on the control board. Power, chilling, and heater. The heater is an external 2prong outlet located on the back for you to use as an outlet for an external oheater that would be dropped into the tank as a failsafe should the temperature be, lower than your set temp. With the relays this is what I have found.

So I just went back to it after letting the temperature warm up a bit. I set it to 66 as the temperature was at 68. Just to make a point to you the fan was blowing as soon as I plugged it in. But as the green Chiller light was flashing, as soon as it went solid I definitely heard and felt the relay click. Pole 1 is receiving NO power and 2, 3 and 4 all are. When the heater one clicked, it was poles 1, 2, & 4. so...

I just did it again and physically held the probes from the voltmeter on j9 and Pole 1 and as the green light was flashing as soon as it went solid it went straight to zero, I also then turn my set temp up to 69 and immediately that pole 1 received power again and as the red light was flashing once it went solid I heard the click and pole 3 went straight down to zero. So I'm assuming all of my relays are working. It has to be something else?
so @SMdude based on this post, can you determine which relay is heater and which is cool? I’m pretty sure that the one with the 2 marks on it(in the pic and labeled in post as poles 1&2) is it..?
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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Also, Is it possible for me to remove the relay, take off the cover, un stick the contact and give it a good sanding to fix it or do I gotta buy a new one?
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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Where the hell do I get this replacement relay? :/

HRS4H-S-DC12V 10a 250V 50hz COS.01 10A 120v 10a 24V
 

Offline SMdude

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Google HRS4H-S-DC12V
They are on farnell, ebay and many other sources.

I forbid you from disassembling the relay and cleaning it!!! Just put a new one in and be done with it.

Depending on your skill at soldering, it might be worth your while to get the relay and take it to someone who can easily do the job.
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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Hahaha ok my friend, I’ve ordered a new pair of them from eBay. I just have to figure out which relay is the cooling one now......
 

Offline SMdude

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I know which one it is, but I'm not going to tell you!  :P
You should be able to figure it out once you separate the 2 boards..   ;)
 
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Offline Airwalk1616

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DUUUUUDE not cool!   Lol I guess it’ll be good for me to try to figure it out...

You can seriously know from just these pics? I thought I’d have to follow the traces to know. But like I said, I’m reeeeally not very knowledgeable with this micro stuff. I understand electricity and how it works but not on a small level like this with micro components... I hope I can figure out which one is the chilling relay to remove and replace it.
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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I know which one it is, but I'm not going to tell you!  :P
You should be able to figure it out once you separate the 2 boards..   ;)
Let me guess.... it’s the one with the two marker markings on it because it’s connected straight to the Compressor wire(black) and the heater circuit doesn’t need to use that as it just powers an outlet is all? It’s so stupid that HOT is Blue and COOL is Red...
« Last Edit: December 04, 2017, 06:41:23 pm by Airwalk1616 »
 

Offline james_s

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You can crack it open and free the stuck contacts to get you by for a while, but once damaged they will quickly weld themselves again so it's no substitute for ordering a new relay.
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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You can crack it open and free the stuck contacts to get you by for a while, but once damaged they will quickly weld themselves again so it's no substitute for ordering a new relay.
right on, thanks. I ordered a couple of new ones today so I'll probably just hold off until they're here. But I'm still not sure exactly which is which....
 

Offline SMdude

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I know which one it is, but I'm not going to tell you!  :P
You should be able to figure it out once you separate the 2 boards..   ;)
Let me guess.... it’s the one with the two marker markings on it because it’s connected straight to the Compressor wire(black) and the heater circuit doesn’t need to use that as it just powers an outlet is all? It’s so stupid that HOT is Blue and COOL is Red...
Well for a start, the way I read the board is, red wire is cool which powers the compressor and fan, blue wire goes to the heating power outlet, the black labeled Com, to me looks like it is "common" and comes direct from the power input lead? and then ACN, which to mee looks to be ac neutral, also from the power input lead.
But without seeing the full pics and or having the unit sitting in front of me, these are just guesses. You need to trace what is connected to where.
Please do that and post a picture or diagram of it.

I don't know that unsticking the relay is a good thing to do, when contacts get bad like that, they can easily burn and cause a fire. If you don't need/use the heater, you could always remove the heater relay and fit it in the cooling position.

As for which relay is which, when you separate the boards and have traced what goes to where, you will know which relay is for cool.
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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@SMdude it's the one WITHOUT the markings. Labeled on the board as D1. The one that's closest to the thermistor connection on the board. :)e I get it now. I think. ...
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 02:03:28 am by Airwalk1616 »
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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I know which one it is, but I'm not going to tell you!  :P
You should be able to figure it out once you separate the 2 boards..   ;)
Let me guess.... it’s the one with the two marker markings on it because it’s connected straight to the Compressor wire(black) and the heater circuit doesn’t need to use that as it just powers an outlet is all? It’s so stupid that HOT is Blue and COOL is Red...
Well for a start, the way I read the board is, red wire is cool which powers the compressor and fan, blue wire goes to the heating power outlet, the black labeled Com, to me looks like it is "common" and comes direct from the power input lead? and then ACN, which to mee looks to be ac neutral, also from the power input lead.
But without seeing the full pics and or having the unit sitting in front of me, these are just guesses. You need to trace what is connected to where.
Please do that and post a picture or diagram of it.

I don't know that unsticking the relay is a good thing to do, when contacts get bad like that, they can easily burn and cause a fire. If you don't need/use the heater, you could always remove the heater relay and fit it in the cooling position.

As for which relay is which, when you separate the boards and have traced what goes to where, you will know which relay is for cool.
I have a question for you. I understand how this relay circuitry works a little bit better now. But my question is where the solder joint that is very thick is connected to both commons on the relays, when power is applied to them and the coil is energized to pull the normally open arms to closed, how does each relay get turned on independently when the commons are connected?
 

Offline SMdude

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Err, well, the common terminal of the relay is where the power goes in and when the relay turns on, the common terminal in the relay is connected to the NO(normally open) terminal where the power goes out.
The coil on the relay is completely isolated from the common, NO and NC terminals.
One side of the relay coil is connected to either gnd, 0v or V+(voltage from the output of the transformer), and the other side connected to the transistor or mosfet, which in turn is connected to the opposite polarity as the other coil terminal. Then the microcontroller sends out a voltage(0v or 5v) to turn the transistor/mosfet on or off, which in turn switches power/gnd to the relay coil.

A picture would paint a thousand words!
Have a look at the relay diagram in the datasheet below.
You could also look up the datasheet of the transistor, draw the circuit diagram, it will be easier for you to understand.

http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/1306711.pdf?_ga=2.117155654.1545737691.1512463944-1448507010.1438655257
 

Offline Airwalk1616

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@SMdude it's the one WITHOUT the markings. Labeled on the board as D1. The one that's closest to the thermistor connection on the board. :)e I get it now. I think. ...

@SMdude I got the relay correct thiugh right?
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 11:12:41 am by Airwalk1616 »
 


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