Electronics > Repair

Motor start or motor run capacitor

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Peabody:
I've ordered the 2MEE4 run capacitor, and should be able to pick it up in a day or two.  I think it should work just fine.  Thanks again for the comments and suggestions.

Peabody:
I installed the new 2MEE4 run capacitor, and of course it works fine for now.  I know I'm years away from knowing if it will make any difference, but at least I feel better knowing I put in the right part.

floobydust:
That 50uF 370VAC oil-filled run cap looks much better than the original.
It's worthwhile actually keeping these older garage door openers fixed, assuming the remote control has good security.
Modern Chamberlain/Liftmaster are a tiny 12VDC brushed motor and gears, slow as molasses. The steel is so thin, it flexes and bounces even with the cushy belt.
All the money went from the mechanical to the WiFi App.
I did not like the need for a Chamberlain centralized webserver to authenticate security, to open/close the door. Looking forward to the day when hackers get all garage doors in the country to open lol.

Peabody:
This old Sears opener is almost entirely mechanical.  It dates back to 1972.  Replacing the radio stuff  at both ends turned out to be pretty easy.  The big shortcoming is that it doesn't have the safety IR beam across the bottom of the door opening, depending instead on some pushback against the closing door to cause it to reverse.  I think code would require the IR beam, so when it comes time to sell the house, I'll have to replace the opener even if it's still working.  I had thought about building an Arduino project to add the IR beam, but in the end concluded that's not a good idea for such a safety feature.  Well, nothing lasts forever I guess.  It's just too bad nobody makes an official IR-beam addon.  But the 1.3HP motor certainly moves the door with authority, and there's nothing to go bad except the drive belt and this capacitor, both of which Grainger carries.

james_s:

--- Quote from: Peabody on May 18, 2021, 02:39:49 am ---This old Sears opener is almost entirely mechanical.  It dates back to 1972.  Replacing the radio stuff  at both ends turned out to be pretty easy.  The big shortcoming is that it doesn't have the safety IR beam across the bottom of the door opening, depending instead on some pushback against the closing door to cause it to reverse.  I think code would require the IR beam, so when it comes time to sell the house, I'll have to replace the opener even if it's still working.  I had thought about building an Arduino project to add the IR beam, but in the end concluded that's not a good idea for such a safety feature.  Well, nothing lasts forever I guess.  It's just too bad nobody makes an official IR-beam addon.  But the 1.3HP motor certainly moves the door with authority, and there's nothing to go bad except the drive belt and this capacitor, both of which Grainger carries.

--- End quote ---

That's not a shortcoming, that's an advantage. Those stupid mandated IR beams were railroaded through by some nanny state busybody after one single incident where somebody was crushed by an improperly adjusted door. As long as you bother to set up the opener and adjust the mechanical obstruction sensor it's perfectly fine. I had so many problems with those damn photo beam sensors getting misaligned, covered in cobwebs or other problems I reverse engineered mine and built a little circuit to bypass it. You don't have to replace the opener to sell the house, there is no requirement to bring old systems up to current code. If I ever sell my house I'm taking my modified openers with me so I don't have to go through that exercise again.

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