Electronics > Repair

Pioneer CS-33A Audio Speakers - Capacitor Replacmant

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sean0118:
Hi all,

I'm re-capping my set of Pioneer CS-33A speakers because one of the 50 year old Elna CE-BP axial caps has exploded (I think before I got it but only just removed the cover).

They are both part of the low and high pass filters (schematic below).

The Elna CE-BP series are bipolar electrolytics, but I'm thinking modern film caps might be better? At least for the 4uF? They should be a lot longer life, lower distortions etc, but just wondering if the lower ESR could cause some nasty resonances??

Thoughts?  ;)






Jeff eelcr:
Could be age or overvoltage. Try the caps you want to and see how they sound to you which is what matters. If you decide to make them out of electrolitic capacitors try to get values close or same as to what was there.
Jeff 

CaptDon:
Buy good quality N.P. (non-polar) capacitors. Don't try the 'back to back 8uf polar = 4uf non-polar'. That trick doesn't work in the real world. I am surprised the cap blew before the woofer would have been fried. With extremely high power at very low frequencies the capacitor would look like an open circuit and not have much circulating current, and with enough power at the mid-low frequencies to blow up the capacitor I would have expected the woofer voice coil to also be damaged. I use a lot of the 63volt N.P. mylar capacitors for my passive crossovers between the mid-high and high horns in my front-of-house system. The caps are yellow in color. My F.O.H. is tri-amped with Low and Mids having their own amplifiers and a three way electronic crossover. The mid high horns and high horns are powered from one amplifier also but have a passive crossover within the horn cabinet which kind of makes my system 4-way.

sean0118:
Thanks all.


--- Quote from: CaptDon on January 16, 2022, 06:23:21 pm ---I am surprised the cap blew before the woofer would have been fried. With extremely high power at very low frequencies the capacitor would look like an open circuit and not have much circulating current, and with enough power at the mid-low frequencies to blow up the capacitor I would have expected the woofer voice coil to also be damaged.

--- End quote ---

That's a good point actually, I noticed the woofer on that side does look a bit different, maybe it is damaged. I've had them in storage but they sounded okay to me when I last used them, but that doesn't mean the woofer is working.  ::)

I picked them up off the street so don't know their history...



andy3055:
That woofer cone must be stuck. Unless some one did some weird thing, some of these old speakers had the glue holding the magnet/pole pieces (or rings) failing and the center pole wold slide to one side locking up the voice coil.

Always use Non polar caps in the cross-overs.

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