Author Topic: PS1 IC link substitution?  (Read 351 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline WyverntekGameRepairs

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 77
  • Country: us
  • MAKE: My Day
PS1 IC link substitution?
« on: December 10, 2019, 02:33:31 am »
I've repaired many consoles before, but the PS1 is the first time I've seen these strange components.

In the PlayStation, there are things referred to as IC links. The part numbers are as follows:
(PS601-603): 1-576-123-21
(PS604): 1-533-282-21
(PS605): 1-576-259-21

By the looks of it, they are basically fuses to prevent the signal outputs of the processor from overloading and damaging the processor or other components linked to it.
The vibration for the remotes didn't work on my console, so I did some poking around and found the IC link to be of fault (there was a time I was working late at night on it, was really tired, accidentally bridged two pins on the controller port with solder during a repair I was working on, and when I tested the console, I didn't notice that I screwed up until I heard a hiss and 2 SMD inductors started bulging and puffing up and spitting smoke. I assume that it blew the IC link as well, causing the problem I speak of now). These components are marked as critical components, and I do not currently have any replacement IC links. By the looks of it, these are not cheap either. The cheap fix I could do until I get a replacement, would be to remove the faulty link and bridge the contacts with solder. However, I think that this could put my console at risk, because if something WERE to happen... Well, you get the point.

Because the PS1's power supply has a supervisory IC to monitor the power going out to the processor, it is very unlikely that it would be overloaded. But I'm afraid that, because nothing is absolutely perfect, there is a chance that something could very well happen. And if it just so happens that it goes wrong when I don't have the replacement link, the processor could be toast.

Is there any good temporary solution that doesn't involve putting the console at risk? Or should I just wait until I get a replacement? What would YOU do in this situation?

(Please note that I'm taking these risks with my own consoles. I do not take risks like this when repairing other people's consoles or peripherals. If this was not my console, I would not even consider an alternative. Again, this is my own console and therefore I can experiment and tinker with it to my heart's content.)
-Sterling Ordes
Wyverntek Game Repairs
(Business License Pending)
 

Offline james_s

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 11122
  • Country: us
Re: PS1 IC link substitution?
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2019, 03:13:13 am »
Do you have a picture of the parts? Is there a schematic showing them in the circuit? That would help identify what they are. From the description it sounds like small fuses but it's hard to say without seeing them.
 

Online fzabkar

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 523
  • Country: au
Re: PS1 IC link substitution?
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2019, 03:15:34 am »
Could it be a polyfuse?
 

Offline james_s

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 11122
  • Country: us
Re: PS1 IC link substitution?
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2019, 03:18:28 am »
I don't think so, a polyfuse would have auto-reset in most cases and not needed replacement. I suspect these are just miniature conventional fuses but without seeing one I'm only speculating.

If one is confirmed dead, it should be possible to crack it open and verify that it is indeed a fuse.
 

Offline WyverntekGameRepairs

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 77
  • Country: us
  • MAKE: My Day
Re: PS1 IC link substitution?
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2019, 03:36:41 am »
I don't think so, a polyfuse would have auto-reset in most cases and not needed replacement. I suspect these are just miniature conventional fuses but without seeing one I'm only speculating.

If one is confirmed dead, it should be possible to crack it open and verify that it is indeed a fuse.

Ironically, I am currently posting this reply from my PS4, so I cannot attach pictures from files. However, if you do some searching around, I'm sure you can find an image. For now, until I can get on my laptop, I can describe to you what it looks like. It is a medium-size SMD package, black, with a number printed on the top, and 2 leads on each end. It looks sorta like a medium-sized SMD tantalum capacitor. It is indeed a fuse, as the data shows that is blows at a certain current. In this case, these are designed to blow above a few hundred milliamps.
-Sterling Ordes
Wyverntek Game Repairs
(Business License Pending)
 

Offline james_s

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 11122
  • Country: us
Re: PS1 IC link substitution?
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2019, 03:42:43 am »
Surface mount and miniature leaded fuses are widely available.

https://www.digikey.com/products/en/circuit-protection/fuses/139?k=surface+mount+fuse&k=&pkeyword=surface+mount+fuse&sv=0&pv2088=u28mA&pv2088=u50mA&pv2088=u62mA&pv2088=u63mA&pv2088=u75mA&pv2088=u80mA&pv2088=u100mA&pv2088=u125mA&pv2088=u150mA&pv2088=u160mA&pv2088=u200mA&pv2088=u250mA&pv2088=u300mA&pv2088=u315mA&pv2088=u350mA&pv2088=u375mA&pv2088=u400mA&pv2088=u500mA&pv2088=u600mA&pv2088=u625mA&pv2088=u630mA&pv2088=u700mA&pv2088=u750mA&pv2088=u800mA&pv2088=u1A&sf=1&FV=-8|139%2C69|409393&quantity=&ColumnSort=0&page=1&pageSize=500

If it were me, I'd either measure the current draw using the fused mA range on a multimeter and then select a fuse based on that, or try to find some specs and pick something similar. It's not rocket science, fuses are not precision devices, something reasonably close will be fine. It's low voltage and low energy so you don't have to worry too much about the details to make it safe.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2019, 03:44:48 am by james_s »
 
The following users thanked this post: WyverntekGameRepairs


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf