Author Topic: hair straigtener fuse?  (Read 2294 times)

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Offline IanB

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Re: hair straigtener fuse?
« Reply #25 on: April 16, 2024, 10:27:05 pm »
someone complained that thermal fuses are difficult to solder

I remember they used to make clip-on heat sinks that you could attach to the flying leads of heat sensitive components? I guess such things must still exist?

Or you could reflow the joint rapidly in a fraction of a second so the heat doesn't have time to travel up the wire?
 

Online coppercone2

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Re: hair straigtener fuse?
« Reply #26 on: April 16, 2024, 10:28:52 pm »
or wrap a wet tissue around it because its a fuse

its good if people know how to solder thermal fuses because there will be less fires

goot wick makes clips. they need to be aluminum so the solder does not stick to them.

for a really fine job you can wrap string around the components, drip some water around it, and then you basically have a conformal super heat sink


It starts to get hard to do when you have very fat conductor (i.e. brazing 1 inch diameter copper rod). Just a shit load of wet stuff won't work anymore, you need some kind of active cooling and really high temperatures. but for small components it works really good

« Last Edit: April 16, 2024, 10:33:24 pm by coppercone2 »
 

Online tggzzz

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Re: hair straigtener fuse?
« Reply #27 on: April 16, 2024, 11:21:52 pm »
but I am suspicious of someone uploading 2 blurry ass pictures, i.e. troll

Trolling could be an explanation, but given the OPs many posts here there and everywhere, I don't think he is trolling. I think his posts can be taken at face value, which is arguably worse.
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
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Online wraper

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Re: hair straigtener fuse?
« Reply #28 on: April 16, 2024, 11:43:04 pm »
It can be challenging to replace it. I've never managed to successfully solder a new one, without overheating it, causing it to trip. I've taken to soldering tinned copper wire to the board and crimping the thermal fuse to it and cutting off the excess wire.
Strange, I never failed to replace one, even when soldering small ones close to the case. I'd understand if it's something rated for like 60oC but usually it's over 100oC. Also you can hold the lead with small pliers of forceps and it will act as a heatsink, although I never needed it.
 

Offline Zero999

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Re: hair straigtener fuse?
« Reply #29 on: April 17, 2024, 07:25:40 am »
I've only tried a couple of times and I did try wet paper towel, to no avail. In the end I crimped it. I can't remember what the temperature rating was.
 

Offline factory

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Re: hair straigtener fuse?
« Reply #30 on: April 17, 2024, 09:27:45 am »
I don't think its wrong to try to repair that but the key is that it is deceptively easy to repair it and that most people don't know how it could be done safely (aka need to admit that its actually a hard repair )

but I am suspicious of someone uploading 2 blurry ass pictures, i.e. troll

how to solder it to answer the question no one cares about anymore, you need efficient heat sinks.

is the idea to throw it out and buy a new one good? its safe. but its also wasteful of resources.

i say wise man say its smart to throw that shit out

This was more to do with the OP, he lacks the ability to diagnose problems & repair stuff, he should not be taking repair jobs in from other people (if this wasn't his).

Also has bypassed the fuse (fire hazard) and is known to cut corners with cheap unsafe parts from aliexpress etc, that don't meet UK safety standards.

And remember this is a 240V appliance, with no earth/ground connection, any damage he does to the metal parts that the heaters are attached too & the insulation, would be a major shock hazard.

The thermal fuse did it's job as something else has failed, it could be the controller or the thermistor, replacing only the fuse would not fix it for very long.

Here is the last one I looked at (don't know what brand it was, picture from over 10 years ago), you should be able to see the mains cable is two core.





David
« Last Edit: April 17, 2024, 09:34:02 am by factory »
 

Offline Zenith

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Re: hair straigtener fuse?
« Reply #31 on: April 17, 2024, 09:31:27 am »
I've only tried a couple of times and I did try wet paper towel, to no avail. In the end I crimped it. I can't remember what the temperature rating was.

If this was being done on a production scale, they might use a custom heat sink, and possibly a lower melting point solder.
 

Online coppercone2

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Re: hair straigtener fuse?
« Reply #32 on: April 17, 2024, 10:37:56 am »
then you might need a combo like wet towel and heat sink clips.


I think thermal fuses are known for being fussy and failing early if their run at elevated temperatures when there is no problem.
 

Offline madires

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Re: hair straigtener fuse?
« Reply #33 on: April 17, 2024, 01:23:51 pm »
When soldering thermal fuses I use large tweezers or small pliers for cooling the leads while trying to be as fast as possible. Sometimes a thermal fuse breaks because of age or thermal stress (not over-temperature). If you don't find any cause for overheating it could be just a bad fuse.
 


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