Author Topic: Headset microphone dead. Special wire/wiring?  (Read 534 times)

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Offline Korbit

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Headset microphone dead. Special wire/wiring?
« on: August 06, 2022, 04:08:28 pm »
Hello,

I tried to repair my headset. The microphone is not working anymore since its cable got broached to mechanical stress.
From Ali I bought a cable to solder the strings together, but the mic still isn't working.
I might have not enough knowledge about the wiring or is it highly likeable, that cables do touch and thats the cause of still not working?
[attach=2]
[attach=3][attach=4]

Also the little on-switch was porous and has cracked out in the repair process.
[attach=1]

Any recommendations what to try next?

Thanks in advance.
 

Offline Nicholas1

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Re: Headset microphone dead. Special wire/wiring?
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2022, 01:11:55 pm »
Some of those wires are covered in an enamel coating, which insulates the wire. If they aren't soldered together properly, there will be no electrical connection.

I recommend for you to disconnect the wires, burn off the enamel coating (don't burn the copper), and try solder them together again. If you have a multimeter, you can check for continuity at by probing both ends of the wire to make sure your solder joint has created an electrical connection.
 

Offline Korbit

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Re: Headset microphone dead. Special wire/wiring?
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2022, 09:32:37 pm »
Good idea.
Do you consider it wise, replacing these fine wires to more solid ones? (Space requirements of the thicker rubber isolation coated ones aside)
 

Offline Audiorepair

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Re: Headset microphone dead. Special wire/wiring?
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2022, 11:10:49 pm »
It is probably wiser to learn to properly solder the enamelled wires to retain their flexibility.

This is actually rather difficult, you will need the hottest soldering iron you have to burn away the enamel and properly tin these cables.
From the photos it doesn't look like you have got there yet.

If you use a multimeter to check for continuity while doing all this, you will find that the headphone speakers will make audible clicks when the meter is connected to it, and very often the microphone will do the same but much quieter, a quick and dirty way of testing whether they work/are connected or not.

 


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