Author Topic: What is this  (Read 1485 times)

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Offline dan3460

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What is this
« on: February 09, 2017, 02:44:04 am »
I'm pretty sure that Dave made a video of something similar but cannot find it. It looks like the transparent surface is some kind of crystal. The thickness of the "crystal" is about 2mm. There are two pins that connect to something on the edge of the lower part of the oblique cut and two that do the same thing on the top part.
Whatizit?
 
 

Offline dan3460

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Re: What is this
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2017, 02:54:35 am »
 

Offline isometrik

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Re: What is this
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2017, 03:04:48 am »
FYI

Dave has covered glass delay lines in these videos:

  • (from21m00s)

 

Offline dan3460

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Re: What is this
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2017, 12:12:09 pm »
Is there anything cool that could be done with them, I found an old box with electronic parts and I probably have 25-30 of them. Maybe that can be a contest, What to do with a bunch of glass delay lines?
 

Online Ian.M

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Re: What is this
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2017, 12:41:33 pm »
http://hackaday.com/2012/11/09/storing-32-bytes-of-data-in-a-piece-of-glass/

You could build a 1Kbit memory with 16 of them, reshaping the pulse in between each unit.   Its the perfect accompaniment to a discrete transistor CPU.
 

Offline Theobald

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Re: What is this
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2017, 01:40:24 pm »
Hi,
it was also used in analog TV set for chroma decoding.
Theo.
 

Offline tronde

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Re: What is this
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2017, 08:35:02 pm »
Hi-tech from the early 1970's.

Chroma delay from Philips K80 chassis. Grandad of the type in the first post. 
K80 was the last of the glow-in-the-dark type chassis(tubes).

Obviously no beancounters at Philips back then.
120 x 49 x 19mm, weight 176g. The metal chassis is made of 0.75mm steel.

Last two pictures shows the piezo transmitter and receiver attached to the glass.


Service manual for the K80
http://www.philipstv.org.uk/blog/early-philips-colour-tv/continental-cousins/continental-manuals/philips-k80-service-manual/

The chroma delay is TD570 i lower left part of this diagram
http://www.philipstv.org.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/img048.jpg
 


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