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Anyone have a ring light that doesn't suck?

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mph7:
Hi all,
I have an AmScope microscope, but the color temperature of the LED ring illuminator it came with was super high, probably 6000-7000K. I sometimes work at night and prefer a warmer light. I swapped it for an old fiber optic/halogen illuminator, which is much nicer, but now I have a bulky fiber optic cable and a separate box with a loud fan.

I'd really love to find an LED ring light with a warmer color temperature, but every light I find is either 6000-7000K or doesn't list the temperature at all. Anyone have a lead?

SteveyG:
I did DIY a design on my channel. I can't remember if I put all the design files on my website, but if not I will update tonight.

My findings are OTS ring lights are pretty crap, even if you pay for expensive ones.

SilverSolder:

The other problem is, are the LEDs used the type that have holes in the emitted light spectrum, or are they the high "photo quality" ones that we really want...

I'm beginning to think DIY is not such a bad idea

schmitt trigger:
White leds really suck for biological sample illumination.
The required wavelengths to examine skin for instance, are either very low level or absent altogether.

I once read a similar project which used RGB leds.
By individually controlling each channel, you can adjust color temperature much better. Without being perfect, it nevertheless is a significant improvement.

SteveyG:

--- Quote from: schmitt trigger on October 13, 2021, 03:44:35 pm ---White leds really suck for biological sample illumination.
The required wavelengths to examine skin for instance, are either very low level or absent altogether.

I once read a similar project which used RGB leds.
By individually controlling each channel, you can adjust color temperature much better. Without being perfect, it nevertheless is a significant improvement.

--- End quote ---

RGB could work, I would be concerned about the homogenisation of the light from the emitters though. Depending on the implementation you might get odd colour bands at the edges of any shadows, diffusers will help but at the detriment of light intensity in the region of interest.

Generally speaking though, we're not usually analysing colours when soldering. A good high quality 3000-4000 K LED is probably sufficient for most situations.

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