Author Topic: Agilent DSO-X scope under yellow light in cleanroom  (Read 4204 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline elCapTopic starter

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 109
  • Country: jp
Agilent DSO-X scope under yellow light in cleanroom
« on: June 24, 2011, 01:42:35 am »
Hi all,
Recently I brought my scope, Agilent DSO-X InifiniiVision, to work for some field test. It worked fine (of course  :)), and I was very pleased to see that the color scheme used for the 4 channels worked very well under yellow light used in the clean room. Anyone worked under yellow light knows that identify things by color is really difficult in this type of environment. And therefore numbers and letters are preferred for identification.

 

Offline EEVblog

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 37826
  • Country: au
    • EEVblog
Re: Agilent DSO-X scope under yellow light in cleanroom
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2011, 05:40:37 am »
Interesting.
Accident or good design?

Dave.
 

Offline tesla500

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 149
Re: Agilent DSO-X scope under yellow light in cleanroom
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2011, 06:03:39 am »
I'm curious, why do they use yellow lights in clean rooms?

Did you have to put the scope through any special cleaning procedure before bringing it into the clean room? I'm sure there's dust collected inside it that could get blown out when you turn it on.
 

Offline elCapTopic starter

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 109
  • Country: jp
Re: Agilent DSO-X scope under yellow light in cleanroom
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2011, 06:40:20 am »
I think by good design. Because the color they use are a little strange in white light, not the first choice for anyone given a task of selecting 4 colors. And by selecting 4 colors that by coincident all work under yellow light seems a little too unlikely.

Working under yellow light is a funny thing. I remember one case where I complained strongly to the design department wondering why they had chosen to use 3 black and 1 red cable for a serial interface. Turned out that they were red, blue, green and purple...
Interesting.
Accident or good design?

Dave.


The reason for yellow light is that the equipment I'm working on is a printer for making photomasks. The substrates have a light sensitive resist (coating) on them. So it's same idea as having red light in an old style photo development room.

Normally there is some cleaning instructions for stuff brought into the clean room. The level of cleaning needed depends very much on what level the clean room is and what kind of activity is going on there. And there is big variation among different companies! Normally you just blow off the dust by compressed air. Then there is air shower you have to pass before going into the clean room. And the laminar air flow in the room will make sure any particles are blown down and out.
I'm curious, why do they use yellow lights in clean rooms?

Did you have to put the scope through any special cleaning procedure before bringing it into the clean room? I'm sure there's dust collected inside it that could get blown out when you turn it on.
 

Offline EEVblog

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 37826
  • Country: au
    • EEVblog
Re: Agilent DSO-X scope under yellow light in cleanroom
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2011, 07:51:19 am »
I do remember being told by a head Agilent R&D person that the Blue LED for the WAVgen was purely arbitrary, the design guys just liked blue!

I know that the calculator division in the old HP used to put a lot of effort into colour research for key legends on the calculators.

Dave.
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf