Author Topic: Good sidecutters?  (Read 17516 times)

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Offline Olivertool

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #100 on: September 18, 2019, 10:48:57 am »
Good afternoon.
I plan to change electrical wires in the whole country house, everywhere I lay NYM 3 by 1.5 and 3 by 2.5 mm.
Need a tool to remove the insulation of the outer shell and from the internal wiring.
What can I choose from this list spam link removed? thank
« Last Edit: September 18, 2019, 03:08:44 pm by Simon »
 

Offline themadhippy

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #101 on: September 18, 2019, 12:17:30 pm »
Quote
Need a tool to remove the insulation of the outer shell and from the internal wiring
Forget side cutters,a decent knife,not the  stanley variety,is much easier.
 

Offline Addicted2AnalogTek

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #102 on: September 18, 2019, 02:49:56 pm »
Good afternoon.
I plan to change electrical wires in the whole country house, everywhere I lay NYM 3 by 1.5 and 3 by 2.5 mm.
Need a tool to remove the insulation of the outer shell and from the internal wiring.
What can I choose from this list https://solderingironguide.com/reviews/best-wire-cutters/? thank

3 x 1.5mm and 3 x 2.5mm?  If you're in the USA like your country icon states, this is 16 AWG and 14 AWG.  More specifically, you'd mostly be using 2 conductor with ground wire.

For starters, current residential applications use 14-2 with ground for lighting only and 12-2 with ground for receptacles (outlet circuits). 
14-2 with 15 amp breaker at the panel ONLY and 12-2 with 20 amp or 15 amp breaker at the panel. If you run any smaller diameter conductor than 14AWG anywhere in your home wiring, you're creating a fire hazard, as there are no breakers smaller than 15A made for residential breaker panel applications.

You can safely install a 15A breaker on a circuit with wire no smaller than 14AWG, and 20A breaker with wire no smaller than 12AWG. (Assuming everything is wired correctly, with correctly twisted and wire-nutted connections, secured connections to screw terminals on outlets and switches, etc. etc.)

If you haven't done any residential wiring before, I'd suggest that you consult a professional journeyman or master electrician, as you can easily create fire hazards and potentially burn down your house and set fire to surrounding vegetation and/or structures.  There's a reason why CODE enforcement and the NEC (National Electrical Code) exist, and it's not just to be a pain in the butt.


If you're going to insist on performing the work yourself, call the local CODE enforcement office and make sure that you're outside of the area which requires a permit to perform such work. (In my case, outside of city limits.)
Get yourself a good, comprehensive home wiring guide.
Consult a licensed electrician and/or CODE enforcement officer regarding proper practices:

What size wire do I need for X application? What size breaker for these devices at X length of wire run?
Where must the wires be stapled? *answer is within 8" of any box entrance and every 32" of open run*
etc. etc.


Typical attitude of people I've observed before attempting to do construction related work:   "How hard can it be? Seems quite simple."
Typical attitude of engineers regarding construction work:    "I'm an engineer, dammit!  I can do your job better than you!"
Typical outcome of both:    "Shit!  I should have called in a professional..."
« Last Edit: September 18, 2019, 03:02:01 pm by Addicted2AnalogTek »
 

Offline helius

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #103 on: September 20, 2019, 10:42:44 pm »
I have a "K.Y.P." automatic cable stripper, like this:

They are also branded as C.K, Stanley, Irwin, and Gardner Bender. (and I found "Högert" and "Toolzone" branded pieces during my image search.) All these tools are identical except for the color.

It works pretty well on typical NM-B type jacketed cable. You can also use it to strip the wires, however I prefer using an Ideal Stripmaster to do that.


The cable stripper does not work on UF-B direct burial cable, because that does not use a loose jacket, but a rubber extrusion that surrounds the wires. To dress the wires you need to use a penknife (in the US, we call them X-Actos). You can also use the penknife to cut NM-B jacket, as long as you are careful not to nick the wire insulation. In some situations this is more convenient because the K.Y.P. tool is 10" long and requires more working space.

 


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