Author Topic: Good sidecutters?  (Read 13232 times)

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Offline hrbngr

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #75 on: April 02, 2018, 08:34:01 am »
eliocor,
thanks for the advice. Where do you use the slightly heavier duty 522n vs the 622n in your work?

nanofrog,
is there any particular style where a super flush/full flush/no bevel might be useful--even with the increased wear/reduced edge life? I mostly mess around w small electronics kits, parts replacement (mouse switch) and will be attempting to assemble a raspberry pi at some point, fyi.
 

Offline eliocor

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #76 on: April 02, 2018, 08:49:34 am »
I prefer the 522 ones for my daily work (even used for stripping from wirewrapping wire to 1.5-2.5mm2 wires!).
please take a look at photos and my opinions regarding those cutters:
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/lindstrom-cutters/
Just to note it, at this date I have not yet replaced the ones photographed 2012-09!!! They are yet good even if used on daily routine!
If you are looking for Tweezers, there is almost one single company: Lindstrom or Ideal Tek which produce them for Lindstrom*.
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/buysellwanted/on-ebay-lindstrom-tweezers/ (you will find some comments of mine also on cutters)

*) but to my knowledge the Lindstrom ones are made better (maybe differente customer requirements) than the Ideal Tek ones!
« Last Edit: April 02, 2018, 08:53:56 am by eliocor »
 

Offline nanofrog

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #77 on: April 02, 2018, 11:37:47 am »
nanofrog,
is there any particular style where a super flush/full flush/no bevel might be useful--even with the increased wear/reduced edge life? I mostly mess around w small electronics kits, parts replacement (mouse switch) and will be attempting to assemble a raspberry pi at some point, fyi.
For what you've described as your usage above, there's no need for this on general purpose cutters.

It's required for things like Mil-Spec & Aerospace systems where physical shock to the component lead becomes important as part of it's reliability concerns, or for very fine pitch SMD cutters so it can actually fit on such tiny pins (i.e. .5mm & smaller pitch QFN).

Oh, and if you're not aware, good quality cutters can be resharpened (further extending their lifespan).  ;)

I prefer the 522 ones for my daily work (even used for stripping from wirewrapping wire to 1.5-2.5mm2 wires!).
please take a look at photos and my opinions regarding those cutters:
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/lindstrom-cutters/
Just to note it, at this date I have not yet replaced the ones photographed 2012-09!!! They are yet good even if used on daily routine!
If you are looking for Tweezers, there is almost one single company: Lindstrom or Ideal Tek which produce them for Lindstrom*.
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/buysellwanted/on-ebay-lindstrom-tweezers/ (you will find some comments of mine also on cutters)

*) but to my knowledge the Lindstrom ones are made better (maybe differente customer requirements) than the Ideal Tek ones!
Lindstrom's cutters aren't the same anymore IME (since production went to Spain). They're not terrible, but you can do better for the same or even less money IME. For example, I've a pair of Rx8140's that I never use. I grab the Swanstrom or a Tronex instead.

FWIW, I've both Ideal-Tek and Linstrom labeled tweezers and can't tell a difference in the fit & finish (new).  :-//
 

Offline hrbngr

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #78 on: April 02, 2018, 11:44:47 am »
eliocar,

thanks for the feedback on usage. I will look closely at the 522s!

re: Tweezers, which thread would be best to post to for further info on where to buy?  On Ebay... or Best Tweezers

nanofrog,

thanks for the feedback. I'll keep the choices to micro/fine/semi-flush and resist the temptation to get those super flush ones...also, was able to pick up both of those carbide cutters you mentioned. Thanks for the links!   :-+

**edit**  Before i place an order w/Schmitz for those cutters, any particular Schmitz plier recommendations for starting out? (might be helpful for someone like me, upgrading to some nice cutters/pliers in one shot to save on those shipping charges)
« Last Edit: April 02, 2018, 11:56:52 am by hrbngr »
 

Offline eliocor

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #79 on: April 02, 2018, 12:17:06 pm »
Quote
Lindstrom's cutters aren't the same anymore IME (since production went to Spain). They're not terrible, but you can do better for the same or even less money IME. For example, I've a pair of Rx8140's that I never use. I grab the Swanstrom or a Tronex instead.
I was talking about tweezers, not cutters. Once I bought the Ideal Tek equivalent of Lindstrom TL SM-108 SA but I was not satisfied at all: the surface finish was not so good and its tips were not rounded like the Lindstrom ones.


BTW, I didn't know Lindstrom cutters are now made in Spain: because I prefer to spend my money on good tools, it is SEVERAL years I do not need to "replenish" them!
But as I wrote, for my daily usage I have always preferred EREM cutters.

Quote
re: Tweezers, which thread would be best to post to for further info on where to buy?  On Ebay... or Best Tweezers
I really do not know: I once found some really good offers on eBay and I spent a discreet amount of money buying several of them.
Now I need no more because none of them require to be replaced: I love good tools and I treat them carefully... No one is permitted to touch them without my consent, so they last literally a life!
My suggestion (if you do not find some good offers on eBay) is to buy them from reputed distributors (RS/Farnell/Digikey/...)
 

Offline nanofrog

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #80 on: April 02, 2018, 06:19:05 pm »
nanofrog,

thanks for the feedback. I'll keep the choices to micro/fine/semi-flush and resist the temptation to get those super flush ones...also, was able to pick up both of those carbide cutters you mentioned. Thanks for the links!   :-+

**edit**  Before i place an order w/Schmitz for those cutters, any particular Schmitz plier recommendations for starting out? (might be helpful for someone like me, upgrading to some nice cutters/pliers in one shot to save on those shipping charges)
You're welcome.  :)

For pliers, I'd go for:These grip very well, which makes them great for removing bad parts off of boards (bad electrolytic caps in particular).
If you want to bend components cleanly (no nicks in the leads), you might want to consider the following as well:The flat nose are also good for straightening out leads (particularly useful when recycling expensive parts).  ;)
 

Offline nanofrog

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #81 on: April 02, 2018, 06:21:51 pm »
I was talking about tweezers, not cutters. Once I bought the Ideal Tek equivalent of Lindstrom TL SM-108 SA but I was not satisfied at all: the surface finish was not so good and its tips were not rounded like the Lindstrom ones.
I don't have that particular pair, so wasn't aware. Wonder if Lindstrom paid for additional finishing or if the Ideal-Tek labelled pair slipped past QC when they shouldn't have.  :-//

The Ideal-Tek labelled ones I have are standard profiles (7.SA, 0.A, 73.ZD*). These would be identical, and the fit & finish match those they're producing for Lindstrom. The rest of my Ideal-Tek's have Lindstrom P/N's.

* ESD conductive zirconium tips on a titanium body (these suckers can take some serious heat). Not made any more.

In regard to Erem, I found a couple of ErgoSense pairs (2422E & 2422EB) cheap, so took a gamble. They cut beautifully, but they slip around in my hands too much. My mistake, but it wasn't an expensive one (~$15 per pair IIRC). I also have a pair of 576TX tungsten carbide cutters I'm not giving up (also one hell of a deal; just needed cleaned up). I really do like the foam grips, but both grip types are a bit small for my hands regardless of how well they grip or not (I'm 6'-4").  :-\

In my case, Tronex and Swanstrom fit my hands much better, and cut just as well. So they won out for me (excellent cut & better control). YMMV of course.

BTW, I didn't know Lindstrom cutters are now made in Spain: because I prefer to spend my money on good tools, it is SEVERAL years I do not need to "replenish" them!
But as I wrote, for my daily usage I have always preferred EREM cutters.
I'm the same way. I've still got a couple of my original Diamalloy cutters (now Xcelite's green handled cutters & pliers).

A bit of history; the man that founded Diamond Calk Horseshoe Company (from Alloy Artifacts) was Otto Swanstrom in 1908. After his decendants sold it to Triangle Tools (which was then sold to Cooper), they created Swanstrom Tools with better cutters.  >:D
 

Offline Dubbie

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Good sidecutters?
« Reply #82 on: April 02, 2018, 07:52:43 pm »
I’ve used the same pair of yellow Lindstrom cutters (the completely flush ones) for almost 2 years now and they are still cutting beautifully. For tough stuff I go with the knipex though which may have something to do with it.

One thing I am looking for is a solution for stripping Kynar wire. I find that if I cut the insulation all the way through which seems to be necessary, I invariably nick the conductor, which weakens it significantly.

Any ideas?
« Last Edit: April 02, 2018, 07:54:45 pm by Dubbie »
 

Offline eliocor

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #83 on: April 02, 2018, 09:22:06 pm »
to strip Kynar (wirewrapping) I bought this stripper:
https://it.rs-online.com/web/c/cavi/accessori-per-cavi-fascette-utensili/spelafili/?searchTerm=t3757 (size 1)

but in general I prefer to use my trusted 522: with some experience and really sharp blades you will never nick the wire and it is much quicker.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2018, 09:27:38 pm by eliocor »
 

Online Circlotron

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #84 on: April 02, 2018, 09:30:12 pm »
Yet another vote for Lindstrom.  :-+ :-+ :-+
Had one of these since 1999 and cut approx 250,000 component leads with them in that time.
Still going strong.

 

Offline Dubbie

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #85 on: April 05, 2018, 08:15:42 pm »
to strip Kynar (wirewrapping) I bought this stripper:...

Thanks, I ordered one. I’ll let you know what I think about it.
 

Offline aabbcc

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #86 on: July 31, 2018, 06:00:05 am »
So I've been using my trusty Engineer NZ12 for the last two years, love em. However recently the little return spring snapped in two which makes it cumbersome to work with. Furthermore Engineer wont sell me just the return spring but asked me to talk to my local disturber and have them order one (there are no distributors for engineer products in Sweden...).

So does anyone know where I can get a return spring OR simply another equally good side cutter? I basically only use it for smaller cables 20-24 awg and for cutting component leads on through hole componenets.

 

Offline Dubbie

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #87 on: July 31, 2018, 07:08:35 am »
to strip Kynar (wirewrapping) I bought this stripper:...

Thanks, I ordered one. I’ll let you know what I think about it.

Ended up getting these. They work beautifully! Quick, easy and no nicks.
 

Offline KL27x

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #88 on: August 06, 2018, 09:28:28 am »
Quote
is there any particular style where a super flush/full flush/no bevel might be useful--even with the increased wear/reduced edge life? I mostly mess around w small electronics kits, parts replacement (mouse switch) and will be attempting to assemble a raspberry pi at some point, fyi.
As others have noted, a true flush cutter should grab insulation a little better when stripping a wire.* The semi-flush will be a few degrees short of perpendicular on the one side, and there will perhaps be a very tiny offset between the two edges.

But a semi-flush/micro-shear cutting edges overlap by a mil or so, so micro nicks don't leave partially cut wires/leads. If you are accustomed to buying your flush cutters in packs and treating them as disposable, you might want to give the semi-flush a try. Not for saving money.... but for having a pair that is 90% as good as a full flush ALL the time, rather than using a full flush in various stages of functionality and needing to have backups. The thing where you learn the part of the blade to use in order to avoid the nick? That will be gone, forever. I used to figure a year or two per cheap flush cutter; I don't know if my sub $10.00 semi-flush will ever need replacing.

One other functional difference is that semi-flush tend to shoot the clipped leads out like a bullet. Full flush are more likely to let the clipped ends gently fall out or even hold them after the cut. This takes a little getting used to, but it's nice that the result is decisive compared to wondering if you are going to be left with a "hanging chad" to rip off.

*The way the micro-shear/semi flush cutters look on my Xurons: Start with a perfect full flush cutter, but make the blades slightly offset. Now the edges pass each other, and the edge of blade A ends up resting on the bevel of blade B by a hair. Then while they are closed together, take a fine file to the flat side of blade B to put slight back bevel on the blade until the edges ALMOST meet, again. In fact, the flat side of blade B starts out a little more than perpendicular, so the result is pretty close to 2 blades with parallel faces on the "flat" side, just not quite in the same plane. I.e., they work very well for stripping. Maybe a good quality full flush strips slightly better by virtue of having perfect $100.00 edge more than difference in angles/geometry.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2018, 06:22:03 am by KL27x »
 
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Offline PedroDaGr8

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #89 on: August 07, 2018, 03:54:54 am »
Somehow I didn't chime in on this one, I would DEFINITELY recommend Tronex for side cutters. They are QUITE robust and are VERY VERY precise. I have been using mine extensively the past few years (sometimes abusing them) and they are still going strong and cutting just as well as the day that I got them. In fact, I am looking at fleshing out my lineup of stuff from them over time because I have been so impressed with their cutters. Oddly enough, I find I use their fine tipped needle nose pliers almost as much as I use tweezers. I like the extra control I get with the long handles. They don't replace tweezers for finest level work but for other stuff they work much better.
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Offline nanofrog

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #90 on: August 07, 2018, 08:14:34 am »
Somehow I didn't chime in on this one, I would DEFINITELY recommend Tronex for side cutters. They are QUITE robust and are VERY VERY precise. I have been using mine extensively the past few years (sometimes abusing them) and they are still going strong and cutting just as well as the day that I got them. In fact, I am looking at fleshing out my lineup of stuff from them over time because I have been so impressed with their cutters. Oddly enough, I find I use their fine tipped needle nose pliers almost as much as I use tweezers. I like the extra control I get with the long handles. They don't replace tweezers for finest level work but for other stuff they work much better.
Excelta has Tronex manufacture most of their cutters (no idea who makes their large & hard wire cutters). Different center screw and a sandblasted finish. So for anyone interested, you can look for a deal on these on eBay.

Swanstrom has the same size grips, and cut very well also. Schmitz is excellent, and less expensive (extensively rebranded, such as CK Tools, Bernstein, and plenty of others).
 

Offline iainwhite

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #91 on: August 10, 2018, 09:08:06 pm »
nanofrog - 
I tried some of the links you provided for the Schmitz cutters on the previous page.  (thanks for listing them)

Sadly, the links now fail and if you go to "http://schmitz-zangen.de/"  you get a message saying that they have changed to using amazon.de for sales.
Unfortunately, amazon.de will not ship these cutters to the USA   :(


 

Offline mtdoc

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #92 on: August 10, 2018, 09:19:35 pm »
nanofrog - 
I tried some of the links you provided for the Schmitz cutters on the previous page.  (thanks for listing them)

Sadly, the links now fail and if you go to "http://schmitz-zangen.de/"  you get a message saying that they have changed to using amazon.de for sales.
Unfortunately, amazon.de will not ship these cutters to the USA   :(

They’re on the US Amazon site too. Just search for schmitz.
 

Offline iainwhite

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #93 on: August 10, 2018, 09:38:30 pm »
They’re on the US Amazon site too. Just search for schmitz.
Thanks mtdoc.

Just that they were about 20% cheaper on the German Schmitz site back when nanofrog made his post, but now the door has closed!
 

Offline mtdoc

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #94 on: August 10, 2018, 10:00:31 pm »
They’re on the US Amazon site too. Just search for schmitz.
Thanks mtdoc.

Just that they were about 20% cheaper on the German Schmitz site back when nanofrog made his post, but now the door has closed!

FWIW, Amazon has a 10% off pliers coupon now. Only works for one though. I’ve got some Scmitz sitting in my cart right now...
 

Offline nanofrog

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #95 on: August 11, 2018, 06:47:59 am »
nanofrog - 
I tried some of the links you provided for the Schmitz cutters on the previous page.  (thanks for listing them)

Sadly, the links now fail and if you go to "http://schmitz-zangen.de/"  you get a message saying that they have changed to using amazon.de for sales.
Unfortunately, amazon.de will not ship these cutters to the USA   :(
Thanks for the notice. This is definitely a recent turn of events.  :( The catalog isn't even available to figure out what P/N's to purchase, which is a mistake IMHO.

Free shipping on Amazon, but it's still an increase of ~$10 per pair vs. making a larger order directly from Schmitz in the past (Amazon's got to get their cut). It simplifies matters for them though, as they don't have to bother with the burden of all the individual order fulfillment as that's now passed onto Amazon. On the upside, it creates a much easier warranty pathway for the customer though.

Still, as the best brands tend to rebrand them, it's still less expensive than adding in their markup.
 

Offline Gromitt

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #96 on: August 12, 2018, 11:24:54 pm »
Well, the site for Schmitz Zangen says that the website is down due to a change of webprovider and until it is up again you can buy from their Amazon shop.

So I guess it's no time to panic.
 

Offline BradC

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #97 on: August 22, 2018, 12:08:56 am »
After snapping 5 of these over 4 years : usually by snapping a blade off or breaking one of the handles at the joint I bit the bullet and bought some Tronex cutters.

Now admittedly I bought my first pair of pros-kit cutters and the rest were warranty replacements, but the Tronex are a completely different level of quality. I actually can't believe the difference or why I've stuck with cheap shit (and at nearly $35 they were not really cheap) cutters for so many years.
 

Offline aabbcc

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #98 on: August 24, 2018, 10:01:02 am »
So after snapping the blade of my trustworthy engineer nz12 (I'm glad it didn't hit my eye because when it snapped the sharp blade flew across the room...) I had to get another pair of side cutters.

Left: Knipex 78-71-125
https://www.amazon.de/dp/B000ZEETWG/ref=pe_3044161_189395811_TE_SCE_dp_1

Right: Engineer NZ12
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PCB-SIDE-CUTTERS-parallel-flush-cutting-snips-offset-angled-neck-Engineer-NZ-12-/261072195172




First impressions of the knipex is very good, super sharp and the little lead catcher is awesome. It's a fair bit wider than the engineer ones so might get another pair of engineers for those really cramped, hard to get to places and the fact that I liked the angled neck of it.

Also ordered a pair of Hakkos since I needed a backup, haven't recieved them yet though.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/POLOLU-2791-Hakko-CHP-170-Micro-Cutter/dp/B077QS6FDM
 

Online helius

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Re: Good sidecutters?
« Reply #99 on: August 24, 2018, 10:40:23 am »
Hakko's CHP series are made by Piergiacomi in Italy.
I have the Engineer NZ-12 also. It's nice that they are so narrow, but they feel less solid than other cutters I've used. I believe that they are primarily for cutting plastic sprue from models, and can be used for soft wires (copper or aluminum). Cutting steel pins with them is taking a risk.
 


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