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Manual solder paste dispenser - recommendations?

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LordXaos:
After reading this thread I dared fetch me the JBC DPM dispenser, and after giving it a quick first try I am not at all disappointed. The amount of paste dispensed can be very well controlled, and it can be aimed very precisely.

It might not be the cheapest choice, but then those pre-filled single-use syringes are not exactly cheap either, and getting a proper dose out of those directly I found virtually impossible.

ygoe:
Hello,

I came to this place because I also found the JBC DPM dispenser and were looking for some reviews of it. This sounds good and I'll probably get one of them, too.

Now there are two models as far as I can see: DPM-A and DPM-B. I'm not sure what the difference between them is. Can the DPM-B hold larger syringes? I'd see if I can get one of the Chip Quik TS391LT, which should have a good alloy, low melting temperature, and slightly different model numbers have received good reviews. It also says it has a long storage period when used. The syringe contains 15 g and it also says "5 cc". Google says that means "5 ml". Could I put that directly into the DPM-B (or -A) or will I have to fill some of it into a syringe provided with the JBC tool?

If somebody has a better recommendation for a solder paste, please let me know. It has to be lead-free.

I already did some SMD hand-soldering on self-designed PCBs (down to 0805 and 1.27 mm pitch) but have no experience with solder paste and reflow soldering yet. I figured I need to move on to that process to handle certain components I need for my hobby projects.

Psi:

--- Quote from: ebastler on May 30, 2021, 08:29:02 am ---Do you mean you just use the bare syringe + tip, and push directly on the plunger with your thumb? In my experience it is difficult to dose reproducibly that way. Also, pushing without any additional leverage becomes quite strenuous, especially when using thin tips with a lot of resistance.

--- End quote ---

That's what most people do.

Note, if you are having issues requiring too much force, then your dispensing needle is probably to small or you are using solder paste with a large ball size. A smaller syringe is also an option.

As others have posted there are automatic and motorized options but unless you are planning on doing this all day its probably not worth it.

I suspect those manual hand-tools that hold a syringe will be hard to position due to the hand grip being to far away from the dispensing end. but the one in your first pic looks like it would be fine.

SteveyG:

--- Quote from: ygoe on August 08, 2021, 10:08:32 am ---Hello,

I came to this place because I also found the JBC DPM dispenser and were looking for some reviews of it. This sounds good and I'll probably get one of them, too.

Now there are two models as far as I can see: DPM-A and DPM-B. I'm not sure what the difference between them is. Can the DPM-B hold larger syringes? I'd see if I can get one of the Chip Quik TS391LT, which should have a good alloy, low melting temperature, and slightly different model numbers have received good reviews. It also says it has a long storage period when used. The syringe contains 15 g and it also says "5 cc". Google says that means "5 ml". Could I put that directly into the DPM-B (or -A) or will I have to fill some of it into a syringe provided with the JBC tool?

If somebody has a better recommendation for a solder paste, please let me know. It has to be lead-free.

I already did some SMD hand-soldering on self-designed PCBs (down to 0805 and 1.27 mm pitch) but have no experience with solder paste and reflow soldering yet. I figured I need to move on to that process to handle certain components I need for my hobby projects.

--- End quote ---

DPM-B is the newer version and accepts two different syringe sizes.

sleemanj:
I took some inspiration from the Tindie one linked in the first post, and another one which also was inspired by it, and created an easily 3d printable version that simply uses an elastic band for the retraction tension. 

The lever gives about 10mm of plunger travel, about 0.2cc, as with the other designs it has multiple steps if you want to refil less often, just move it backwards a couple notches when the lever runs out of travel.

Waiting on some fresh solderpaste so havn't actually tried dispensing with it yet, but as long as the elastic can give enough pull to retract, I don't see why it wouldn't work, the lever can exert plenty of force.

If you have a 3d printer it should take you an hour or two to print and a couple of M3 screws at least 30mm long.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:5153474



Obviously you'd want to use a dispensing tip on it :)

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