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Measure small inductances

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T_guttata:
Hi

I'm looking for an LCR meter in order to measure small inductance values starting at around 5 uH. After some googling I found several devices:

DER-EE DE-5000

Seems to be the best value for the money, however, it seems hard to get. Is it still beeing produced? Are there any non-ebay suppliers? Is there any successor?

Hantek 1833C
http://www.hantek.com/products/detail/16180

They claim an accuracy of 4% for the range of 0-4 uH. I did not find too many reviews.

Keysight U1733C
https://www.keysight.com/ch/de/support/U1733C/handheld-lcr-meter-100-hz-120-hz-1-khz-10-khz100-khz.html

It's too expensive for hobby.

Peaktech P2175

https://www.peaktech.de/uk/PeakTech-P-2175-LCR-Meter-11000-Counts-20H-110-mF-20-MO/P-2175

They claim Accurate measurements from approx. 0.5Ω, 1nF or 10µH upwards but it only goes to 1kHz

Are there more alternatives? Do you have any suggestions?

What's about a different approach: function generator + DSO? O don't have a function generator yet but a Rigol DSO

Thanks for your help.

Edit: I accidently posted in the wrong category, should have been in "Test equipment".

Berni:
The DE-5000 is a really good LCR meter for the money. I think these mostly sell trough the ebay/aliexpress/amazon etc in general, not all companies want to deal with selling directly to consumers.

5uH is not that difficult to measure so even the cheap 10$ 3 terminal autodetecting component testers(transistors,diodes,,caps,inductors etc..) will likely be able to measure it, they can do down to pretty low uH and pF

You can certainly use a signal generator, scope and some elbow grease to do a inductance measurement, it's just not very fun to do often as it needs quite a bit of setup and some manual math to actually get the result. The best instrument to abuse for this is a vector network analyzer since in the smith chart display it will typically show the resistance and reactance of whatever is connected. Some might show it as a complex impedance, but many will show it as farads or henries. This is typically a good way to measure very tiny reactance such as pF and nH because VNAs typicaly go up into rather high frequencies past 1 GHz so this makes such tiny reactance much easier to measure. So well sited for measuring say the capacitance or inductance of a PCB trace. However a VNA is much more expensive than a LCR meter, so its more of a thing if you happen to have one rather than buying one for this purpose.

PartialDischarge:
I have the LCR200 from extech and actually like it very much

T_guttata:
Well, even if the DE-5000 is very good, I don't want to buy from untrusted sellers. Therefore, I prefere to get one device which is highly available.

Do you think it's possible to measure 5 uH with 1kHz?

Then I could go with the Peaktech P2175. I have a power supply from this brand and I'm happy. They do good marketing as the products (and they have many devices) have a coroperate design.

If that's not enough, the EXTECH LCR200 would be an option, but it's significantly more expensive (around US $275).

There seem to exist several devices which use the same main IC:

EXTECH LCR200
Peaktech P 2170
Lutron LCR-9184
Tenma 72-10465
UNI-T UT612
Mastech MS5308
Voltcraft LCR 300
Axiomet AX-LCR42
Aktakom AMM-3320
ktakom AMM-3035
Kusam KM-520B

bob91343:
I would use the nanoVNA.  Or an obsolete boat anchor, Boonton Q meter or RX meter.  I have both and they work well for small inductance, very accurate.  You pick the frequency of measurement and get inductance and Q.

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