Author Topic: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?  (Read 54440 times)

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Offline HackedFridgeMagnet

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #75 on: February 05, 2016, 08:12:16 am »
It's also very important to match the crimp to the cable size.

Sounds obvious but I couldn't see any mention of it.

I just put those little bootlace ferrules on with bull nose pliers.
Three gentle squeezes along the ferrule with the cutting edge.
 

Offline vinicius.jlantunes

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #76 on: February 05, 2016, 11:29:47 am »

Assuming they're still made in Sweden, they're a rebranded Pressmaster, which is an excellent quality tool.

If I'm reading the currency correctly however (R$ = BRL ? <Brazilian Real>), then there's no way a genuine Pressmaster will sell for that (works out to ~43USD according to Xe.com, so it would have to be a Chinese clone for that price).

FWIW, genuine Burndy isn't cheap. For example, the battery powered PAT46-18V is just shy of 6kUSD for example.  :o). It's on the extreme side for a hand tool, but the ratcheting hand operated versions are still starting at ~168USD, and go north of 300USD quickly.

Thanks nanofrog. Yes, R$ is BRL; the prices also struck me as being a bit low indeed. I remember using a Burndy branded crimp tool in a lab I worked, one of those big crimpers - yeah, it was very expensive and also very good.

That store is a reputable big chain around here though, so I wouldn't think they would sell anything counterfeit - but it could perhaps be a "B" line from Burndy for not so interesting markets such as Brazil?
Another theory is that due to the fact BRL went through a bit of a dive against USD in the past few months, this is old stock from when exchange rates were still ~2:1 and they haven't raised the price.

I think in the end I might just buy one and try my luck... if it turns out to be good I let you guys know  :D

Thanks!

Offline nanofrog

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #77 on: February 05, 2016, 06:26:42 pm »
So was there a definate answer about trapezoid vs square. I been looking at Hex ones too, but cannot figure out why so many choices.
In terms of current, it doesn't matter so long as they conform to DIN spec.

Where the shape matters, will depend on the wire insertion type & shape of the device they're inserted into. For example, if you've flat parallel jaws that use a set screw to clamp the terminated wire, either the square or trapezoidal are sufficient. If it's a couple of V shaped spring or screw contacts however, then hexagonal is the appropriate terminal, as there's more surface for the spring contacts to "bite" into for proper current transmission.

Mind you the only time i use crimpers is on the car, and my mates use ebay knock offs. PIDG is different how?
  • Nylon insulation is resistant to hydrocarbons (greases, oils, etc.) and has high dielectric strength
  • Copper sleeve between insulation and terminal body provides excellent wire support after crimping
  • Funneled wire entry on terminal prevents turned back wire strands and permits rapid wire insertion during high speed production
  • Product is rated for use up to 105 degrees C and 300 Volts
  • Serrations in the crimp barrel provide maximum contact and tensile strength after crimping

The cheaper alternatives use vinyl as the insulation material, which isn't as resistive to chemicals, can't take as much heat (rated for 90C), and don't have the metal funnel that's crimped on the wire's insulation (they do make vinyl with the funnel & serrations, but they're priced almost identically to the PIDG or equivalents). None of them however, including PIDG, are sealed, so can easily corrode in automotive and marine applications. They're designed for fixed wiring installations in non-corrosive environments (i.e. inside an indoor metal panel or LV control systems).

For automotive and marine applications, you want to use either a heat shrink terminal or DIY one out of a non-insulated terminal + adhesive lined heat shrink (bit more effort cutting & fitting the heatshrink, but it's less expensive  ;)). FWIW, I use the latter method, and it works properly (has kept me from having to either buy a new tool or 2 sets of dies too  >:D).    :-+

It's also very important to match the crimp to the cable size.

Sounds obvious but I couldn't see any mention of it.

I just put those little bootlace ferrules on with bull nose pliers.
Three gentle squeezes along the ferrule with the cutting edge.
FWIW, I've assumed everyone knows this in my case.

As per your method, that's not enough to cause the wire & terminal to cold weld to one another (what happens in a proper crimp). All the strands & terminal literally becomes a single, contiguous piece of metal. Without this, you'll have a higher contact resistance, which can cause problems, including melted insulation if it's high enough.  :o

Thanks nanofrog. Yes, R$ is BRL; the prices also struck me as being a bit low indeed. I remember using a Burndy branded crimp tool in a lab I worked, one of those big crimpers - yeah, it was very expensive and also very good.

That store is a reputable big chain around here though, so I wouldn't think they would sell anything counterfeit - but it could perhaps be a "B" line from Burndy for not so interesting markets such as Brazil?
Another theory is that due to the fact BRL went through a bit of a dive against USD in the past few months, this is old stock from when exchange rates were still ~2:1 and they haven't raised the price.

I think in the end I might just buy one and try my luck... if it turns out to be good I let you guys know  :D

Thanks!
I was thinking less counterfeit, and more of a consumer line (didn't see mention of it on their website, but I didn't dig either). So sort of like your idea of a "B" line for specific markets. FWIW, I know stuff in Brazil is expensive from PM's with another member that resides there, so I'd still expect a higher price when the exchange rate was ~2:1 (a COO of Sweden can be seen on some photos of their hand operated ratcheting crimpers).

As per the Chinese made clones (patent on that style is expired), they vary wildly from works properly as-is, to needs adjustment to get it into spec, and cannot be adjusted into spec no matter how hard you try. QC varies that much IME.  :( Hopefully you'll get a good one.  :)

I'd recommend getting a spec sheet (may have to email for it) for the terminals you decide to use. Then measure and perform pull-out tests to make sure it's in spec before making crimps on any service or control wiring (real job).
 

Offline Sjokolade

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #78 on: February 17, 2016, 05:45:02 pm »
This is the Elpress Mobile,  it's the same as the Pressmaster Mct - really nice tool that seem to have really high quality.

http://www.elpress.se/searchTool/pdf_tools/MOBILE_GB_0051.pdf

What I didn't like was the grey die release button on the plier, felt like really hard plastic and I had to press it hard to release the dies - was worried it might break off.
Other then that all the casettes and the dies themself was good, dies marked with both awg and mm2 square millimeter - the two dies halves wont fall apart as the thick rod holding them together when out of the cassette.

Not all made in Sweden, one die made in Germany.

Got a Knipex 97 52 34 SB on the way from ebay, hope it's not a fake one.
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Offline quarks

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #79 on: February 17, 2016, 06:45:50 pm »
looks like very good qualtity tool :-+
 

Offline jwm_

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #80 on: February 17, 2016, 08:54:19 pm »
I use the astro one and a real crimper is one of the best purchases I have made.

http://www.amazon.com/Astro-9477-Professional-Interchangeable-Tool/dp/B0045CUMLQ

the dies are simple to change, just pull it out and push another in and the case is rugged and holds things in.

The only thing i'd like is a cheat sheet on the case that shows which terminal types go with which dies... perhaps i can make one up..

Offline nanofrog

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #81 on: February 17, 2016, 09:24:22 pm »
What I didn't like was the grey die release button on the plier, felt like really hard plastic and I had to press it hard to release the dies - was worried it might break off.
FWIW, I've not had this issue with mine.  :-//

Not all made in Sweden, one die made in Germany.
Be aware they got in trouble for improperly marking COO, as their dies are actually cast in Taiwan, and finished in Sweden according to the US office personnel I had contact with (in violation of their own COO regulations). So they've removed any COO on more recent production (been a few years now; stock photos are pre-court ruling).

I've not seen any other dies marked with Germany on them, so that's a new one on me (older stock photos showed "Made in UK" for insulated terminal dies). And as you can see, mine has no COO markings at all.





I use my Panduit CT-1550 for insulated terminals though, which is a rebranded Wezag with their own die spec. It does a much better job with the Red terminals as the Pressmaster die doesn't fully produce the inspection markings on the insulation for both the original that was sent back and existing set in the photos (dots aren't fully rendered = they wouldn't pass a compliance inspection). Blue and Yellow are fine on my Pressmaster dies (never tried the Green profile).
 

Offline HackedFridgeMagnet

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #82 on: February 17, 2016, 10:29:09 pm »

It's also very important to match the crimp to the cable size.

Sounds obvious but I couldn't see any mention of it.

I just put those little bootlace ferrules on with bull nose pliers.
Three gentle squeezes along the ferrule with the cutting edge.
FWIW, I've assumed everyone knows this in my case.

As per your method, that's not enough to cause the wire & terminal to cold weld to one another (what happens in a proper crimp). All the strands & terminal literally becomes a single, contiguous piece of metal. Without this, you'll have a higher contact resistance, which can cause problems, including melted insulation if it's high enough.  :o

I don't think crimping is going to do that. If you tear the crimp apart there will still be separate conductors.

I'm trying to follow your 
Quote
:o
line of thought here.

What about screw terminals is the resulting junction cold welded? Talking about copper and brass here.
If they are the cold welded the wires would not separate when you undid the terminal.
If they aren't then are you saying they are not safe? They measure a very low resistance.

Similarly Relays don't cold weld in normal operation and conduct well.
 

Online Monkeh

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #83 on: February 17, 2016, 10:38:33 pm »

It's also very important to match the crimp to the cable size.

Sounds obvious but I couldn't see any mention of it.

I just put those little bootlace ferrules on with bull nose pliers.
Three gentle squeezes along the ferrule with the cutting edge.
FWIW, I've assumed everyone knows this in my case.

As per your method, that's not enough to cause the wire & terminal to cold weld to one another (what happens in a proper crimp). All the strands & terminal literally becomes a single, contiguous piece of metal. Without this, you'll have a higher contact resistance, which can cause problems, including melted insulation if it's high enough.  :o

I don't think crimping is going to do that. If you tear the crimp apart there will still be separate conductors.

If you cut open a properly done crimp joint on find stranded cable you'll have one hell of a time telling there were separate conductors in there, let alone separating them. Cold welding is the whole point of crimping.
 

Offline HackedFridgeMagnet

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #84 on: February 17, 2016, 11:06:14 pm »
If you cut open a properly done crimp joint on find stranded cable you'll have one hell of a time telling there were separate conductors in there, let alone separating them. Cold welding is the whole point of crimping.

Well it's not the whole point of crimping. Sometimes I just want to put lugs on wires.

So should all crimped connections cold weld, to the point of not being able to separate conductors?

Seems to me if cold welding was doing all the holding then you wouldn't need the ferrule itself, you could just cold weld the wires together.
I'm taking the point to the extreme to see if it still holds, and it doesn't.

Crimping two wires still relies on a sound, non cold welded mechanical connection. 8)
 

Online Monkeh

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #85 on: February 18, 2016, 12:11:01 am »
So should all crimped connections cold weld, to the point of not being able to separate conductors?

Yes.

Quote
Crimping two wires still relies on a sound, non cold welded mechanical connection. 8)

The cold weld IS the sound mechanical connection. That's the mechanism by which a proper crimp joint works. Anything else is just hope.
 

Offline HackedFridgeMagnet

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #86 on: February 18, 2016, 02:01:59 am »
Look I don't doubt what your saying is true but I am trying to understand it.

Is a connection of two wires at a screw terminal a cold weld?

If it is why can you unscrew it and easily separate the conductors?
If it isn't then why is it used, as it would then be inferior to to a cold weld? Or maybe it's not really that much inferior to a cold weld.
 

Offline nanofrog

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #87 on: February 18, 2016, 08:28:16 am »
Is a connection of two wires at a screw terminal a cold weld?

If it is why can you unscrew it and easily separate the conductors?
If it isn't then why is it used, as it would then be inferior to to a cold weld? Or maybe it's not really that much inferior to a cold weld.
A screw terminal does not form a cold weld. This is intentional, as screw terminals are designed to allow for it's connection to be removable in order for things to be replaced, such as a circuit breaker in a service panel, or even reconfigured, such as low voltage industrial controls. Same with relays; the external electrical connections are designed with replacement in mind. You may also notice that spade or ring terminals have a large surface area that's equivalent or greater than the cross-sectional area of the conductor for proper current flow (generates heat if it's too small, which can lead to failures such as melted or charred insulation that can result in shorts, and even fires).

A crimp OTOH, is designed to be permanent.

Knowing this, now let's go back and think about boot lace ferrules for a moment. The wire is meant to be permanently attached to the ferrule, so it gets crimped, while the outside is designed to be removable from the circuit breaker screw terminal it's inserted into. Same goes for spade or ring terminals for example (wire gets crimped, terminal is then attached to a device via a screw terminal for future replacement, maintenance, or some other form of service).

Hopefully I've explained this well enough it will make enough sense to you.  :)

BTW, notice I've not included spade terminals in the removable group (rings & forks), as it's actually designed to cold weld at the M-F contact junctions for reliability & signal integrity.
 

Offline HackedFridgeMagnet

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #88 on: February 18, 2016, 09:31:13 am »
Thanks,

 but I bit I don't understand is
if pressure creates the cold weld then why isn't there a cold weld when 2 copper wires are screwed into the same terminal? I guess it is less pressure.
But I can surely do up a terminal with at least as much force as say a 2.5mm csa crimper.
 

Offline nanofrog

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #89 on: February 18, 2016, 10:33:18 am »
Thanks,

 but I bit I don't understand is
if pressure creates the cold weld then why isn't there a cold weld when 2 copper wires are screwed into the same terminal? I guess it is less pressure.
But I can surely do up a terminal with at least as much force as say a 2.5mm csa crimper.
Fundamentally, a proper crimp requires both sufficient force, and fresh metal (non-oxidized surfaces), or it will not weld.
 
In the case of a screw terminal, it applies far less pressure than a proper crimp (likely under ~300 N / 67 lbs., depending on how much hand strength the installer can apply to the screwdriver without stripping the screw head). Proper crimp tooling OTOH, will apply thousands of Newtons of force. For example, my Pressmaster MCT applies 10,000 N /~2250 lbs. to the terminals (excessive application is prevented via stops built into the dies to limit the distance the dies can compress, so the terminals aren't over-crimped). Most ratcheting crimp tools I've seen specs on, apply at least 7000 N / ~1573 lbs.

During the crimping process, the deformation process exposes fresh metal on the mating surfaces so it can weld (breaks up the oxide layers). Screw terminals can't do this on all the mating surfaces however. The wire may have fresh non-oxidized metal exposed due to mechanical force, but the screw surface itself may not (i.e. steel rather than tin, copper, or brass), and opposite non-moving parallel mating surface will not. So even if the screw terminal manages to produce enough pressure for a cold weld to occur, it's still missing the second key factor of non-oxidized metal on all mating surfaces.
 

Offline HackedFridgeMagnet

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #90 on: February 18, 2016, 11:00:18 am »
Fundamentally, a proper crimp requires both sufficient force, and fresh metal (non-oxidized surfaces), or it will not weld.
 
In the case of a screw terminal, it applies far less pressure than a proper crimp (likely under ~300 N / 67 lbs., depending on how much hand strength the installer can apply to the screwdriver without stripping the screw head). Proper crimp tooling OTOH, will apply thousands of Newtons of force. For example, my Pressmaster MCT applies 10,000 N /~2250 lbs. to the terminals (excessive application is prevented via stops built into the dies to limit the distance the dies can compress, so the terminals aren't over-crimped). Most ratcheting crimp tools I've seen specs on, apply at least 7000 N / ~1573 lbs.
Ok so there is a massive force difference. I didn't realise it was so much.

During the crimping process, the deformation process exposes fresh metal on the mating surfaces so it can weld (breaks up the oxide layers). Screw terminals can't do this on all the mating surfaces however. The wire may have fresh non-oxidized metal exposed due to mechanical force, but the screw surface itself may not (i.e. steel rather than tin, copper, or brass), and opposite non-moving parallel mating surface will not. So even if the screw terminal manages to produce enough pressure for a cold weld to occur, it's still missing the second key factor of non-oxidized metal on all mating surfaces.
Yeah but I wasn't talking about dissimilar metals I was talking about when you put 2 copper wires into the same screw terminal and why they don't weld then.

Anyway thanks for the info.


 

Offline nanofrog

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #91 on: February 18, 2016, 11:17:46 am »
Ok so there is a massive force difference. I didn't realise it was so much.
Not necessarily that easy to realize, especially with ratcheting crimp tools.  :) To put this into perspective, a ratcheting crimp tool is designed to multiply say ~225 - 235N max. to 7k - 10k N at the die, so ~ 30 - 31x for their multiplication factor.  :o  Definitely don't want to get a finger stuck in there.  :-DD

Yeah but I wasn't talking about dissimilar metals I was talking about when you put 2 copper wires into the same screw terminal and why they don't weld then.
I was talking hard v. soft metals as the surfaces have to be able to deform in order to expose fresh metal so it can cold weld (if you can deform steel sufficiently, you'd be able to cold weld that too). But there's not enough force to do that in a screw terminal, nor are all of the surfaces designed to deform.
 

Offline Sjokolade

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #92 on: February 18, 2016, 11:55:32 am »

Be aware they got in trouble for improperly marking COO, as their dies are actually cast in Taiwan, and finished in Sweden according to the US office personnel I had contact with (in violation of their own COO regulations). So they've removed any COO on more recent production (been a few years now; stock photos are pre-court ruling).

I've not seen any other dies marked with Germany on them, so that's a new one on me (older stock photos showed "Made in UK" for insulated terminal dies). And as you can see, mine has no COO markings at all.

Ahh this is interesting, was not aware of this.
I see on page two of the pdf I linked to the two first dies for insulated terminals are made in England and the dies themself has different casting/machining on top and bottom.

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Offline linux-works

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #93 on: June 06, 2016, 03:49:58 pm »
replying to a older thread, I realize..

I'm about to order some crimp tools and wanted to make sure I am getting the right ones.

some of you guys talked about this:

https://www.waytekwire.com/item/560/Waytek-Customizable-Crimping-Tool-Frame/

and I like the idea of a frame and plugins, as long as there will be enough plugins to make it worth getting.  this brand seems like they are serious (right?)

I'm not really sure what terminals I'll encounter, that's my problem.  I'm not going to buy 1000 of one type and know exactly what type I'll be using.  it will be the style usually found in 'automotive' clps, the red, blue and yellow ones:

https://www.waytekwire.com/item/562/DIE-SET-FOR-22-14-GA-INSULATED/

but I may use a combo of insulated, non-insulated (with my own HS) or maybe the fancier and costlier non-vinyl insulated types.

if I don't know which kinds (specifically) I'll run into, is there a 'safe bet' set of dies that I should buy that will likely work?  the one I linked to seems like one to own. 

this one covers 2 more 'colors' for the insulated line:

https://www.waytekwire.com/item/561/DIE-SET-FOR-26-22-12-10-GA-INS/

not sure I need it; as I think I'm going to see more of the red and blue types.

for HS terms, this one shows up in a pre-selected set so maybe its worth getting at the same time:

https://www.waytekwire.com/item/566/DIE-SET-FOR-22-14GA/

??

for non-ins terms, is this one recommended?  it was also on the combo set listing:

https://www.waytekwire.com/item/567/DIE-SET-FOR-22-10-AWG/


I also tend to use a lot of molex KK terms:



any idea which die would work for the various molex KK's ?


cheers
 

Online nctnico

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #94 on: June 06, 2016, 04:16:19 pm »
If they don't specify what kind of connectors their dies are for then it is a total shot in the dark. Why don't you ask them?

I have seperate ratchet style crimpers for various connectors and ferrules from Ebay.

This crimper works reasonably well for crimping molex KK254:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/TU-190-08-XH2-54-PH2-0mm-DuPont-Terminal-KF2510-Crimping-Tool-Pliers-/121934180951
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Offline nanofrog

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #95 on: June 06, 2016, 11:33:13 pm »
this brand seems like they are serious (right?)
Yes.

They make a lot of crimpers for various terminal manufacturers, such as Thomas&Betts, 3M, and Molex. Tool brands such as Xcelite and Wiha as well. Do note that the interchangeable die models do require a bit more skill to use properly, particularly in knowing how & where to position both the terminal and wire.

It will be the style usually found in 'automotive' clps, the red, blue and yellow ones:

https://www.waytekwire.com/item/562/DIE-SET-FOR-22-14-GA-INSULATED/
These ^ are made for vinyl and nylon insulated terminals, which are meant for fixed installations (i.e. buildings), not high vibration environments such as automobiles. Also, given the size of the dies, they can't fit red, blue, and yellow nests on a single die so they're split up; red and blue on one, and yellow and green on another.

For automotive use, you should use the non-insulated terminals + adhesive lined heat shrink tubing or heat shrink terminals (the latter type are more expensive).

For non-insulated terminals with stranded wire: 4300-3142 Die Set for 22-10 AWG Terminals (butt splice, ring, ... that have a brazed/welded seam). Note, the single indent nest is for stranded wire, while the double indent nest is for solid wire (4300-3139). If the seam isn't welded/brazed, skip it (they spread out and won't cold weld properly, if at all).

For open barrel, it will depend on the specific size of the terminal. If you notice the photos carefully, they tell you what the dies are for (etching in the die).

6.3mm/.250" open barrel: 4300-3146 Die Set for Non-Insulated Terminals, 22-10 AWG (think switch & relay contact tabs, so also very useful)
4.8mm/.187" open barrel: 4300-3151 Die Set for Non-Insulated Push-On Terminals, 22-14 AWG, DIN 46247-2
2.8mm/.110" open barrel: MCT4300-3150 Die Set for Non-Insulated Push-On Terminals, 18-22 AWG, DIN 46247-1

Metric/inch sizes ^ are for the connector width (i.e. spade or fork width). Depending on the KK terminal used, you'd be looking at either the 4300-3150 or 4300-3151.

The Evolution of a Crimp article on Connector + Cable Assembly Supplier might be of some interest.

 
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Offline IdahoMan

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #96 on: August 10, 2016, 07:16:13 am »
I'd like to BUMP this.

Been reading up on Crimpers (nanofrog's info, http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/wire_termination, TE Connectivity vids, etc.).

I've got most of the info I need I think, but finding a good tool seems to be the hard part. They are either absurdly priced, going Chi-chi, changing ownership, simply not to spec, some kind of catch, many copies of a tool not to mention the forgeries, S&H too high, etc.. Just don't know what to trust.

I'd like to find a good "universal" (dies) Crimper for crimping all the different kinds of terminals, except of course for the really large stuff (2AWG-MCM) that would take a different tool.

  • UL, DIN, or Mil spec. (see above link)
  • No China (no-brainer)
  • Fair priced.

Some of the Crimpers linked to here, like the WayTek/Pressmaster, are they to spec? Seems like they would be a nice tool if they worked. Another tool (link above) that looks good is the FTZ for the large stuff (6awg-250MCM), but it is now made in China. >:(


 
« Last Edit: August 10, 2016, 07:17:53 am by IdahoMan »
 

Offline batteksystem

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #97 on: August 10, 2016, 08:43:51 am »
I looked up the specs on the multi crimp.  Looks like a great idea, but the crimp dies are limited.  I found only 5 dies available and they include none for the small stuff.  I have little use for 10AWG. 

The trapezoidal end sleeve crimp is new to me, should be square IMHO. 

Seems to get more sizes you need to get the crimp system pliers.  A much more expensive route.  :(

I use hydraulic crimp for 2 to 6 AWG wiring.

Offline nanofrog

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #98 on: August 10, 2016, 02:26:25 pm »
I'd like to find a good "universal" (dies) Crimper for crimping all the different kinds of terminals, except of course for the really large stuff (2AWG-MCM) that would take a different tool.

  • UL, DIN, or Mil spec. (see above link)
  • No China (no-brainer)
  • Fair priced.
Even with interchangeable die systems, you won't necessarily be able to cover every terminal you need as there's none that offer every die possible. Of course, if your terminal needs are limited to just a few types, one tool with the necessary dies available would do.

Some of the Crimpers linked to here, like the WayTek/Pressmaster, are they to spec? Seems like they would be a nice tool if they worked. Another tool (link above) that looks good is the FTZ for the large stuff (6awg-250MCM), but it is now made in China. >:(
Waytek is just a vendor; Pressmaster is the actual manufacturer, and they make top of the line stuff (think Thomas&Betts' crimpers). As per meeting spec, the wire prep has to be correct, as does both terminal and wire placement to meet specs (no locators, so additional skill is required here). Regardless, if you've compliance issues, you'll want to make some test crimps and compare to the terminal manufacturers' Go/NoGo specs (you may have to request these).

Wezag is another tier 1 crimp tool manufacturer (i.e. they make Panduit's crimpers, such as the CT-1550/1551 or 1701). Unfortunately, I don't recall them offering an interchangeable system. Knipex does however, so you could take a look at those.
 

Offline IdahoMan

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Re: What crimping tool do you use for quick connect terminals?
« Reply #99 on: August 13, 2016, 03:03:51 am »
Thanks again nanofrog.

That Waytek crimper (re-branded Pressmaster "MCT"?), as of August 2016:

  • Is it still made in Sweden? I contacted Waytek but haven't received a response yet.
  • Are the dies accurate and durable? They are expensive, I've seen them sold for $40-$111.

Quote
They make a lot of crimpers for various terminal manufacturers, such as Thomas&Betts, 3M, and Molex. Tool brands such as Xcelite and Wiha as well. Do note that the interchangeable die models do require a bit more skill to use properly, particularly in knowing how & where to position both the terminal and wire.

I'm pretty precise and don't need the tool to do the work for me. What the tool does have to do, if I understand crimping, is: Be accurate (in this case the die machining?), apply enough force to cause the proper "Cold Weld", and not fall apart due to use. Have you any experience with the "MCT" model by chance?


BTW, on a minor note and just for the heck of it, what do you think of those hammer crimers for large terminals? I tried it out on some 6AWG welding wire and a ring terminal, dremeled it apart to take a look.. idk. It is said that a "cold weld" fuses the wire strands and terminal together like a solid piece. How much of an exaggeration is that? Ever dissected/teardown a good crimp before? Any pics?

Thank you.


IM




« Last Edit: August 13, 2016, 03:22:30 am by IdahoMan »
 


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