Author Topic: Incorrect and misleading statements on RF safety characterize UK group's report  (Read 875 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline cdev

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5082
  • Country: 00
This is pretty interesting. An independent analyst picked apart the main official UK proclamation on RF safety and finds it loaded with conflicts of interest and misleading statements.

...


"Accuracy  is  vital  when  most  people  only  read  the  executive  summary  and 
overall  conclusions  from  a  348-page  report  and  national 
and  international  public  health  decisions  and  exposures 
are based on them. These conclusions did not accurately
reflect the evidence, as described in 
examples below."

...

Here is the official citation and the paper's abstract:

Quote
Sarah J. Starkey*
Inaccurate official assessment of radiofrequency
safety by the Advisory Group on Non-ionising Radiation

DOI 10.1515/reveh-2016-0060
Received September 30, 2016; accepted October 16, 2016

https://www.degruyter.com/downloadpdf/j/reveh.2016.31.issue-4/reveh-2016-0060/reveh-2016-0060.pdf

Abstract:
  The  Advisory  Group  on  Non-ionising  Radiation 
(AGNIR)  2012  report  forms  the  basis  of  official  advice 
on   the   safety   of   radiofrequency   (RF)   electromagnetic   
fields  in  the  United  Kingdom  and  has  been  relied  upon 
by  health  protection  agencies  around  the  world.  This 
review   describes   incorrect   and   misleading   statements   
from  within  the  report,  omissions  and  conflict  of  interest,
which make it unsuitable for health risk assessment.
The  executive  summary  and  overall  conclusions  did  not 
accurately  reflect  the  scientific  evidence  available.  Inde-
pendence  is  needed  from  the  International  Commission 
on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), the group
that set the exposure guidelines being assessed. This con-
flict  of  interest  critically  needs  to  be  addressed  for  the 
forthcoming  World  Health  Organisation  (WHO)  Environ-
mental  Health  Criteria  Monograph  on  Radiofrequency 
Fields.  Decision  makers,  organisations  and  individuals 
require  accurate  information  about  the  safety  of  RF 
electromagnetic  signals  if  they  are  to  be  able  to  fulfil  their 
safeguarding responsibilities and protect those for whom
they have legal responsibility.
"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 
The following users thanked this post: boB

Offline boB

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 131
  • Country: us
    • my work www

    I like it !!

The  Advisory  Group  on  Non-ionising ......

  "AGonIsing" !

K7IQ
 

Online tggzzz

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9863
  • Country: gb
    • Having fun doing more, with less
Numbers, not adjectives, please.

I reckon that I am exposed to 180-270 micromorts[1] per day, simply by living.

How many do you expect 5G will add?

[1] Micromorts are probably the best way of comparing risks. See
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120209-a-lesson-in-risk
https://understandinguncertainty.org/micromorts
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micromort
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 

Offline cdev

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5082
  • Country: 00
Why the urgency?

-----

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30373877

Ann Clin Lab Sci. 2018 Sep;48(5):677-687.
Review: Chemical Pathology of Homocysteine VI. Aging, Cellular Senescence, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.
McCully KS

Abstract

Following the discovery that caloric restriction extends the lifespan of many species of animals, the free radical theory of aging attributes the occurrence of oxidized nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids to reactive oxygen radical species originating from the metabolism of foods and the diminished efficacy of oxidative metabolism. Because of the decline of many critical neuro-hormones in aging, the neuroendocrine theory of aging attributes these changes to reduced feedback control of hormone production by the hypothalamus. Several rare genetic diseases attribute accelerated aging to changes in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) repair, depletion of the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), and altered methionine and homocysteine metabolism. The theory of oxidative phosphorylation attributes mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis to the active site, thioretinaco ozonide oxygen NAD+ phosphate, which couples polymerization of NAD+ and phosphate to ATP produced by reduction of oxygen by electrons derived from foods. Loss of the thioretinaco ozonide oxygen ATP complex from the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) is proposed to explain the abnormalities of oxidative metabolism occurring in cellular aging and carcinogenesis, thereby uniting the free radical and neuroendocrine theories of aging. Cellular senescence is associated with shortening of telomeres and decreased activity of telomerase, and exposure of cultured endothelial cells to homocysteine causes cellular senescence, shortened telomeres, and increased acidic β-galactosidase, a marker of cellular senescence. The decrease in telomerase with aging is related to decreased nitric oxide production by nitric oxide synthase. The pathogenic microbes occurring in atherosclerotic plaques and in cerebral plaques in dementia inhibit nitric oxide synthesis by up-regulation of polyamine biosynthesis from adenosyl methionine and putrescene, causing the hyperhomocysteinemia and suppressed immunity that is observed in atherosclerosis and dementia. Progressive mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in aging because of loss of the thioretinaco ozonide oxygen ATP complex from mitochondrial membranes by opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Melatonin, a neuro-hormone, and cycloastragenol, a telomerase activator, both prevent mitochondrial dysfunction by inhibition of mPTP pore opening. The carcinogenic effects of radiofrequency radiation and mycotoxins are attributed to loss of thioretinaco ozonide from opening of the mPTP and decomposition of the active site of oxidative phosphorylation. The anti-aging effects of retinoids, the decreased concentration of cerebral cobalamin coenzymes in aging, and the diminished concentration of NAD+ from sirtuin activation, as observed in aging, all support the concept of loss of the thioretinaco ozonide oxygen ATP active site from mitochondria as the cause of decreased oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial dysfunction in aging.

© 2018 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

adenosyl methionine; aging; asymmetric dimethylarginine; carcinogenesis; cellular senescence; cobalamin; dementia; endothelial progenitor cells; homocysteine; melatonin; mitochondrial dysfunction; mitochondrial membrane potential; mitochondrial permeability transition pore; mycotoxin; nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide; nitric oxide; oxidative phosphorylation; radiofrequency radiation; retinoic acid; sirtuin; telomere; thioretinaco ozonide; thioretinamide

PMID:
    30373877






Numbers, not adjectives, please.

I reckon that I am exposed to 180-270 micromorts[1] per day, simply by living.

How many do you expect 5G will add?

[1] Micromorts are probably the best way of comparing risks. See
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120209-a-lesson-in-risk
https://understandinguncertainty.org/micromorts
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micromort
"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 

Online tggzzz

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9863
  • Country: gb
    • Having fun doing more, with less
Why the urgency?

<reference of unstated relevance omitted>

Numbers, not adjectives, please.

I reckon that I am exposed to 180-270 micromorts[1] per day, simply by living.

How many do you expect 5G will add?

[1] Micromorts are probably the best way of comparing risks. See
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120209-a-lesson-in-risk
https://understandinguncertainty.org/micromorts
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micromort

What urgency?

That you ask about "urgency" indicates a gross misinterpretation of a simple, short post.

What, then, should we assume about your interpretations of long, subtle and complex texts?
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 

Offline helius

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2850
  • Country: us
The paper quoted in the OP was published in a journal with an impact factor of 0.6 (that's oh point six).
Since there are many "predatory" publishers who will publish any kind of junk, researchers need objective criteria to distinguish good from bad journals. Impact factor is an average of how many times the average paper in a journal is cited: 0.6 is very low and raises suspicion that the journal in question is not worth the dead trees it's printed on. It's an even lower impact factor than Biomedical Hypotheses!
 

Online bd139

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 11562
  • Country: gb
I hate these reports. A big problem with them is that there is no causality or credibility. It's all correlation and then conclusions. Nothing more than attention grabbing from whoever wrote it. If they throw enough shit it might stick one day and in the mean time funding will continue, usually from some shitty industry funded thinktank.

For example the usual behavioural problems caused by mothers' use of mobile phones in children. Is it?

1. Nature. Does the RF cause degenerative problems during pregnancy?
2. Nurture. Is it the lack of mobility and attentiveness caused by the addictive devices 7 years after the sprog has popped?

There's no way to prove either unless there's a conclusive controlled test case which proves it and that's actually illegal. And no the mouse models used aren't sufficient. Not even slightly.

On top of that, the background noise from pollution, cigarettes etc is too high to even derive any data from it.

Real RF safety advice:

1. Don't hold a chinese 25W burner HT next to your head
2. Don't look down a waveguide.
3. Don't try and have intimate relations with a mobile phone tower.
4. Don't try and microwave your head.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2019, 09:51:57 am by bd139 »
 

Offline cdev

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5082
  • Country: 00
The more I read about this the more I suspect that RF, like a number of similar areas where regulation is also being deliberately broken have a strong possibility within the next few years gradually together adding up to create major global health problems for the world's people. Problems that are at that point going to be impossible to halt because of stealth entitlements to preempt national rights to regulate which are going to impact countries like our own and others.

Hypothetical future non-biased regulators wont be able to regulate, they won't be able to say no. The question will have been nailed down outside the jurisdiction of nation-states to fix.

The effect of this will be to steal peoples health, for example, people whose apartment blocks have cell-phone base stations mounted on their own or a neighbor's roofs, in an uncompensated manner.  They plan to install them every 100 to 200 meters. Thats a lot.

Or, what about people who constantly carry a cell phone in a pocket close to- their gonads.

Look at the areas where they clearly were trying to trivialize the science. Oxidative stress. Reproductive issues including male fertility, etc.

Those areas are problematic and the outdated practice of just measuring heat ignores the other effects which can be quantified, particularly the oxidative stress need to be looked at in a far more granular manner, because vulnerability to oxidative stress is much higher at the beginning of life and later in life than in the middle.

The kinds of experiments they would need to really show subtle effects in, say children, of increased oxidative stress for mothers during pregnancy, can't be done.

However, people have been studying oxidative stress generally for a long time and its a body of science where the effects of oxidative stress generally are quite consistent and very well known.  Thats what I have been trying to tell people. They left that out.

The same issue is what worries me about numerous other kinds of exposure, such as low level ionizing radiation. It also causes oxidative stress. So does mercury and heavy metal exposures, so do numerous chemicals.

You should do enough reading to not be subject to "trust us, we're experts" BS.

Certain things are really worrisome. Here is another one, failure to address was pointed out in the critique..

There has been a lot of research which show measurable changes relating to reproduction, such as to the testes, particularly to the quality of human sperm, from strong RF fields, within the range people are commonly exposed to now.. 

A search for papers pulls up a lot of hits. Just picking a few of the very first ones illustrates what I am trying to explain.

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/omcl/2018/5076271/

Another

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240172/


This is not new information. But many people don't seem to be aware of this and the 'official' reports that attempt to sweep it under the rug arent helping us understand it either.

Given these pressures I think the only reasonable path is to go very slowly or stop until much more data has been gathered in these areas where there remain some very important health questions.

Keeping that in mind, if people really want to understand this, put more effort into reading papers - read more original papers to get the finer points of what they say.

Papers you can find in fifteen quality minutes of searching on databases. You miss a lot only reading abstracts. And even more only reading "official experts". Too much!

If I really want to understand something I print it out so I can mark it up with my questions as I read.

I go through a lot of paper doing this. But its what works for me the best.

« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 08:44:26 pm by cdev »
"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 

Offline coppercone2

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3273
  • Country: us
  • 💎
lol phone companies are some of the scummiest fuckers you can deal with so be careful with anything they say (particularly prices but still).

they would probably sell you a piece of plutonium if they could

seriously don't trust them, I am not kidding as far as accounting goes their up there with the mafia.

i hope they get regulated out the ass. you can't work with them without feedback unless you get the best plan. otherwise shit just keeps escalating for no reason at all. no other utility works like that.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 10:18:26 pm by coppercone2 »
 

Offline cdev

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5082
  • Country: 00
I read recently that statistically cell phone tower work is now by far the most dangerous job in the US. They are supposed to in theory wear safety gear but the workers are so pushed for time they basically are under constant pressure to work faster and so - ooops..

Really sad stories of people cut down in the prime of life, for trying to feed their families.
"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf