Author Topic: LimeSDR: Flexible, Next-generation, Open Source Software Defined Radio  (Read 5031 times)

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Offline AbduTopic starter

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Hackaday
"What makes LimeSDR interesting is that it is using Snappy Ubuntu Core as a sort of app store. Developers can make code available, and end-users can easily download and install that code."

Electronics Weekly
"Crowd-funding changing the game for chip firms"

Microwave Journal
"Learn and test new communications techniques, unleash new applications and open up new markets using the powerful LimeSDR platform"

Electronic Engineering Journal
"...a low cost, app-enabled software defined radio (SDR) base station that can be programmed to support any type of wireless standard – putting significant power at the disposal of anyone who wants to innovate in the world of wireless"

EE Times - Europe
"Lime Microsystems have built a wide range of open source support tools and resources...from the outset"

Wireless - Electronic Specifier
"Create and deploy wireless network infrastructure almost anywhere at a fraction of today’s costs"

Features & Specifications

    RF Transceiver: Lime Microsystems LMS7002M MIMO FPRF (Datasheet)
    FPGA: Altera Cyclone IV EP4CE40F23 - also compatible with EP4CE30F23
    Memory: 256 MBytes DDR2 SDRAM
    USB 3.0 controller: Cypress USB 3.0 CYUSB3014-BZXC
    Oscillator: Rakon RPT7050A @30.72MHz (Datasheet)
    Continuous frequency range: 100 kHz – 3.8 GHz
    Bandwidth: 61.44 MHz
    RF connection: 10 U.FL connectors (6 RX, 4 TX)
    Power Output (CW): up to 10 dBm
    Multiplexing: 2x2 MIMO
    Power: micro USB connector or optional external power supply
    Status indicators: programmable LEDs
    Dimensions: 100 mm x 60 mm


Block Diagram
Comparisons
                            HackRF One    Ettus B200    Ettus B210    BladeRF x40    RTL-SDR    LimeSDR
Frequency Range    1MHz-6GHz    70MHz-6GHz    70MHz-6GHz    300MHz-3.8GHz    22MHz-2.2GHz    100kHz-3.8GHz
RF Bandwidth            20MHz    61.44MHz    61.44MHz    40MHz    3.2MHz    61.44MHz
Sample Depth    8 bits    12 bits    12 bits    12 bits    8 bits    12 bits
Sample Rate    20MSPS    61.44MSPS    61.44MSPS    40MSPS    3.2MSPS    61.44MSPS (Limited by USB 3.0 data rate)
Transmitter Channels    1    1    2    1    0    2
Receivers    1    1    2    1    1    2
Duplex    Half    Full    Full    Full    N/A    Full
Interface    USB 2.0    USB 3.0    USB 3.0    USB 3.0    USB 2.0    USB 3.0
Programmable Logic Gates    64 macrocell CPLD    75k    100k    40k (115k avail)    N/A    40k
Chipset    MAX5864, MAX2837, RFFC5072    AD9364    AD9361    LMS6002M    RTL2832U    LMS7002M
Open Source    Full    Schematic, Firmware    Schematic, Firmware    Schematic, Firmware    No    Full
Oscillator Precision    +/-20ppm    +/-2ppm    +/-2ppm    +/-1ppm    ?    +/-1ppm initial, +/-4ppm stable
Transmit Power    -10dBm+ (15dBm @ 2.4GHz)    10dBm+    10dBm+    6dBm    N/A    0 to 10dBm (depending on frequency)
Price    $299    $686    $1,119    $420 ($650)    ~$10    $299 ($199 early bird)
 

Offline arekm

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Almost finished -> https://www.crowdsupply.com/lime-micro/limesdr
Close but still needs 50 k$.
 

Offline matseng

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Yesterday there was two pledges at the $99,000 -level, today there's only one. I guess both of them are either fake or shills....
 

Offline rwgast_lowlevellogicdesin

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Im not sure how much it matters here but may be relevant if this is fake. A while ago I was looking for some kind of broadband receiver chips for SDR and I came across either a company or a chip called lime. This by far was the best chip out there I could find... it was 16 bits I think had a ton of bandwidth range along with a nice IF bandwidth 20 or 30mhz I think, AND 2x MIMO. Anyways I e-mailed these guys and explained that I wanted to use there chip in an SDR I asked for a sample but also told them I had no problem buying a few of them.

Anyways I never received an e-mail back from the company, I cant even remember how I found these lime chips to begin with, but they looked to good to be true.

Kind of off but I know the airspy uses the realtek r280t2 chips found in dongles, how does one wanting to get an SDR get access to chips like this? Air spy has shown that the realtek stuff makes a good SDR if you ditch the controller chips and add a nice transverter. The USRP and HackRF are the only broadband usb SDR's that use chips you can actually buy. Well maybe the funcube does but I haven't looked much in to the funcube considering its crappy IF bandwidth, id assume its an audio codec. Being a home brewer and consultant I have no idea how this businesses stuff work when it comes to trying to prototype with a chip that you cant just buy of digikey or at least sample/buy from the manufacturer like realtek, broadcom, and lime.

Online PA0PBZ

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Im not sure how much it matters here but may be relevant if this is fake. A while ago I was looking for some kind of broadband receiver chips for SDR and I came across either a company or a chip called lime. This by far was the best chip out there I could find... it was 16 bits I think had a ton of bandwidth range along with a nice IF bandwidth 20 or 30mhz I think, AND 2x MIMO. Anyways I e-mailed these guys and explained that I wanted to use there chip in an SDR I asked for a sample but also told them I had no problem buying a few of them.

http://www.digikey.nl/product-search/en?mpart=LMS6002DFN
Keyboard error: Press F1 to continue.
 
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Offline rwgast_lowlevellogicdesin

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Well I feel pretty stupid now.... I don't recall the site listing distributors or any where to buy links though. I had never hear of lime so I guess I just didn't even bother checking distributors.

Im glad you gave me the link though Im defiantly going to give the datasheet a read and maybe pick one of these bad boys up!

What about the realtek chips, how would one go about procuring those? I know the AirSpy/SDR# guys use them but im sure if I sent them an e-mail they probably wouldn't want to answer my question because I would have less of a reason to buy there product. I would imagine these are easier to get started with compared to the lime, #1 there not QFN and there much cheaper than 30 dollars per unit.

Online PA0PBZ

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What about the realtek chips, how would one go about procuring those?

I have not searched for that one, but if you want to experiment a bit just get yourself one of those cheap dongles and take the chip off.
Keyboard error: Press F1 to continue.
 

Offline rwgast_lowlevellogicdesin

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I have thought about that, but there are two issues.... the R802t2 doesnt have a proper data sheet with register list, unless you sign an NDA I would guess. Secondly... if I build an SDR from scratch that isn't audio based you bet your butt Im going to try to make it much better than an Rtl stick and try to get it to around 50 bucks then sell it on tindie... cant do that with one chip :/

Offline zl2wrw

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<SNIP>
http://www.digikey.nl/product-search/en?mpart=LMS6002DFN

I believe that the LMS6002DFN is the chipset used successfully in the BladeRF - IMHO Lime probably know what they are doing as far as producing SDR chips is concerned.

PS: I am a backer of the LimeSDR crowdsupply campaign.
 

Offline rfbroadband

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I have characterized the Lime Chips in detail. They are ok but the ADI RF SDR chips have much better performance.
 


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