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US FCC requires implementation of STIR/SHAKEN protocol to combat Robo-calls

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james_s:

--- Quote from: TimFox on October 21, 2021, 05:27:08 pm ---Being retired and having time on my hands, I would often call the "missed call" number (which was almost always spoofed) and get the telco announcement "The number you have called is not in service".  Very rarely, the actual phone number was actually in service for an innocent account holder, who was surprised to hear from me.  I found it amusing that the spoofed phone number is often not only in my 3-digit area code, but also in my 3-digit exchange, implying that the "Federal Reserve legal department" office or "Medicare benefits office" is in my neighborhood.

--- End quote ---

I've heard more than once of people getting irate calls from strangers accusing them of calling them with scams. Unfortunately what has happened is the randomly generated number some scammer used happens to be the actual phone number of some poor sap who has no knowledge of their number being used for this.

DrG:

--- Quote from: Gary350z on October 21, 2021, 05:42:52 pm ---....
I don't know, just passing along information. :-//

Another Robocaller False Alarm!


--- End quote ---

I watched the video. I see no valuable new information. The links in the OP give the story in a much cleaner fashion. As has already been noted, it is a dynamic situation.

The approach of screaming; it is just a FALSE ALARM, it won't work and, they could fix it if they wanted to ....is not valuable information to me - it is simple venting. Did I miss the grand proposal revealed in that video? You know, the one that would fix the problem?

madires:

--- Quote from: james_s on October 22, 2021, 10:46:04 pm ---I've heard more than once of people getting irate calls from strangers accusing them of calling them with scams. Unfortunately what has happened is the randomly generated number some scammer used happens to be the actual phone number of some poor sap who has no knowledge of their number being used for this.

--- End quote ---

Happens also over here. Despite local regulations enforce correct caller IDs for call centers, telcos don't check the IDs of calls originated in other countries. A while ago some Indian call enter tried to scam me and they have set their caller ID to a different German number each time they called. AFAIK, it would easy for telcos to overwrite the fake caller ID with the correct line number as they receive also the line number from the originating telco for billing reasons. For a legitimate custom caller ID, like a local toll-free number for a call center outside the country, they could implement some registration process to allow the custom ID.

NiHaoMike:

--- Quote from: madires on October 23, 2021, 03:29:03 pm ---A while ago some Indian call enter tried to scam me and they have set their caller ID to a different German number each time they called.
--- End quote ---
If it's a real caller, just put the phone up to the smoke alarm and press the button. Or better yet, perhaps someone can figure out what bit sequence decodes to the loudest possible sound and write an app to blast the scammers?

madires:

--- Quote from: NiHaoMike on October 26, 2021, 12:38:06 am ---If it's a real caller, just put the phone up to the smoke alarm and press the button. Or better yet, perhaps someone can figure out what bit sequence decodes to the loudest possible sound and write an app to blast the scammers?

--- End quote ---

When I took their first call I cursed them in Hindi. ;D   hint: search for "bad words in Hindi"

The idea with the loud sound might work also. But I would implement it in my VoIP PBX.

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