Author Topic: EMP Shield Scam  (Read 9344 times)

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Offline rgarito

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EMP Shield Scam
« on: May 23, 2019, 05:14:18 pm »
This should be highly entertaining....

https://empshield.com/
 

Offline Neilm

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2019, 06:19:05 pm »
Rubbish - it only works on 120 V...
Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe. - Albert Einstein
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Online Brumby

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2019, 05:04:58 am »
Yeah ... there is a certain credibility gap calling it an "EMP" shield.

That said, however, there could be some benefit....

EMP creates potentially high, damaging voltages by interacting with conductive materials.  In the case of a house, you would have the various electrical/electronic devices themselves and you would have the wiring that feeds power to them.

Devices that are encased in a full metal enclosure will have the essence of a Faraday shield (albeit potentially compromised by gaps and openings), but the wiring feeding them will be exposed.  In this case, the wiring could pick up an induced EMF.  This, however, would be akin to the same sort of risk you get from lightning - and in the case of nearby lightning strikes, the mechanism will be practically identical.  (A direct lightning strike will be pretty much mean the death of anything remotely connected.)  I believe this is why they include lightning protection in their claims.

As it is, I look at it as a bit of marketing flim-flam because, let's face it, the current means of creating a dangerous EMP is limited to atmospheric detonation of a nuclear device - and if that's happening somewhere close enough to cause a damaging EMP, then I think you'll have bigger worries.
 

Offline Jeroen3

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2019, 06:02:19 am »
So $300 for a box with a varistor?
 

Offline Daixiwen

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2019, 06:25:13 am »
I find it interesting that they publish the tests results, showing that the EMP shield passed the RS105 test of the MIL-461G standard, (simulating radiated emissions from a nuclear detonation) and the high current pulses, that simulate conducted emissions on the cables due to a nuclear explosion. What is nice in those test reports is that they show how they performed the test, including some pictures (what is that mysterious Unit 4 on the bottom of page 9 by the way?)
As we could expect, they only tested the EMP shield itself, and not the shield connected to an equipment to protect and of course the only thing this test proves is that the EMP shield itself can survive an EMP. So money well spent I'd say  :-DD
 
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Offline tkamiya

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2019, 05:05:53 pm »
Seems people who spend tons of money on these things doesn't know anything about EMP and EMF on factual basis.  Some of the tactics sellers use are down-right fraud, and there are so many out there.

Tried many times to explain electro-magnetic spectrum.  I usually lose them on similarity between visible light, microwave (oven), and house hold mains.  I never get to ionozing and non-ionizing radiation, which is really a core of the subject.
 

Offline orion242

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2019, 06:02:20 pm »
Quote
Quick acting HEMP surge protection that switches in less than <1 nanosecond
:-//
 
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Offline OE2WHP

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2020, 08:05:23 am »
just wanted to reainmate this thread, because someone from a prepper forum (where I happen to be a mod) brought this up as the new best solution in the EMP protection world.
As far as I know there is nothing that can prevent electronics from an EMP besides a proper faraday cage. So, I would be highly interested in your opinions regarding this products.

Thanks
OE2WHP
 

Offline Daixiwen

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2020, 08:20:43 am »
My professional opinion is that this is crap  ;D

Not only you would need to make your whole house a faraday cage, but you would also need to filter any cable coming in and out of your cage. This includes of course the power, but also Tv/radio antennas, phone and internet. You would need good passive filters, this box will not do anything good.

But anyway, if you have a nuclear explosion near your house, you will probably have more things to worry about than fried electronics :D
 

Online coppercone2

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2020, 12:43:29 am »
yea if you grow weed you might be able to cure the lung cancer that you get from the radioactive dust, it might be a better investment in a nuclear war then having a working anything
 

Offline helius

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2020, 02:20:23 am »
As it is, I look at it as a bit of marketing flim-flam because, let's face it, the current means of creating a dangerous EMP is limited to atmospheric detonation of a nuclear device - and if that's happening somewhere close enough to cause a damaging EMP, then I think you'll have bigger worries.
Without intending to give anybody bad ideas: the world's militaries have been developing conventional EMP devices for decades. The same technologies used for high-intensity inertial fusion research (Z-machines) can be used to generate EMPs.
 

Offline WattsThat

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #11 on: August 10, 2020, 04:27:36 am »
100% bee-ess. I’d like to know how they meet this claim:

“Although the grid may be down, your electrical equipment and home will still be functional if you have EMP Shield”

Yeah, right. Sure. So long as I have a 20kw backup genset and the fuel to run it.
 

Online CatalinaWOW

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #12 on: August 10, 2020, 04:41:16 am »
This falls in a grey area.  Clearly hype and marketing claims, but at root a real product with some value.  While EMP can directly affect electronics, how much damage will be done is highly variable depending on the strength of the EMP, orientation of the device and various potential shielding effects such as metal roofs and metallized foil insulation barriers. I suspect that an awful lot, maybe a majority of electronics will survive this direct effect damage.

Probably the biggest risk for most people is the power surge that will occur on some power lines - again depending on the orientation of the lines relative to the EMP wave and a variety of other things.  This box at least has the potential to deal with this.  But probably little better than any other lightning surge protector.  And it would be nice to have your equipment working when and if the grid comes back to life.
 

Offline bc888

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #13 on: August 10, 2020, 02:07:56 pm »


I'm not sure the adequately detail how one is suppose to direct the estimated 50,000 plus volts from the E1 through the device so that all of your electronics are safe. Sounds like magic. If they detailed the speed which it acts vs some of the classic products out there it would be interesting. Might have a real benefit in a CME or Lighting strike where the voltage is running down the wires and not via the air like an EMP. Curious what others think.


Siemens FS140 Whole House Surge Protection = $ under 200 US.

This magically device = $369 US.
 

Offline Daixiwen

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #14 on: August 11, 2020, 08:04:15 am »
Even if it worked by itself the way it is connected to the breaker box makes it completely useless. With those high frequency pulses the long cables act as high impedance and will not prevent an EMP from the grid to go directly to all the devices connected to the breaker box. The EMP shield may be the only thing that would survive the EMP :D
 

Offline opto_isolator

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Re: EMP Shield Scam
« Reply #15 on: January 04, 2021, 01:46:28 am »
Thought I'd share what I found:

https://pdfpiw.uspto.gov/.piw?PageNum=0&docid=10742025&IDKey=36E709D42475&HomeUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fpatft.uspto.gov%2Fnetacgi%2Fnph-Parser%3FSect1%3DPTO2%2526Sect2%3DHITOFF%2526p%3D1%2526u%3D%25252Fnetahtml%25252FPTO%25252Fsearch-bool.html%2526r%3D1%2526f%3DG%2526l%3D50%2526co1%3DAND%2526d%3DPTXT%2526s1%3Dcarty%2526s2%3Demp%2526OS%3Dcarty%252BAND%252Bemp%2526RS%3Dcarty%252BAND%252Bemp

If you look at the diagrams (and descriptions) it appears that all this is, is a collection of surge devices between phases /  neutral / ground.  Most likely it's a collection of TVS diodes, probably something like this:

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Littelfuse/15KPA120A/?qs=MLCmBfHNlR5528SJT7SrPg%3D%3D

So it's a fairly simple design that uses off the shelf parts.  From what I can tell, it's not supposed to shield your devices in the house from a direct EMP hit, meaning if you are in the danger zone, the field strength will just be everywhere and everything will be hit unless they are in a faraday shield.  I beleive the intent of this is to address only the power feed coming into your house - which would possibly work if the actual EMP would not have much influence of other devices due to proximity, as it would shunt (quickly) any large voltage surge generated by the E1 to ground.  It appears that this device is a combination device to address EMP as well as standard surges genereated by system imbalances and lightning strikes.  Considering they charge what they do for it, they're making a killing compared to parts / assembly cost.
 


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