Author Topic: "Low noise" 70/33 GHz scopes from Tektronix  (Read 4178 times)

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Offline electr_peter

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"Low noise" 70/33 GHz scopes from Tektronix
« on: March 25, 2015, 12:43:54 pm »
Tek released some info about 70 and 35 GHz "low noise" oscilloscope series (DPO77002SX/DPO73304SX).
http://info.tek.com/uk-dpo70000sx-ati-performance-oscilloscope-em.html
http://www.tek.com/datasheet/dpo70000sx/dpo70000sx-series-datasheet
http://info.tek.com/rs/tektronix/images/55W-30662-0_DPO70000SX-Datasheet.pdf

Aside from improving technical specs, Tek decided to make this instrument rack mount with small screen and limited controls on the front panel. Almost all control functions are done via PC connection and, optionally, via auxiliary front panel (see picture).

Does this mean typical common oscilloscope format (front end, processing, screen, front panel) will be changed to modular instruments in near future?
 

Offline tmbinc

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Re: "Low noise" 70/33 GHz scopes from Tektronix
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2015, 03:12:21 pm »
I'd love to have the stand-alone frontpanel for my DPO5000, as the scope's frontpanel is really frustrating.
 

Offline XFDDesign

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Re: "Low noise" 70/33 GHz scopes from Tektronix
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2015, 07:26:38 pm »
I'm no authority on this particular scope, but it isn't uncommon to have this kind of product used in automated test racks. In such cases, most everything is software driven anyway.

Tek has, in the past, done similar products where the instruments are crammed into a small box and today you see other versions of this with things like PXI.
 

Offline Wuerstchenhund

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Re: "Low noise" 70/33 GHz scopes from Tektronix
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2015, 09:06:47 pm »
Aside from improving technical specs, Tek decided to make this instrument rack mount with small screen and limited controls on the front panel. Almost all control functions are done via PC connection and, optionally, via auxiliary front panel (see picture).

These scopes were clearly designed for automated testing, and not really as bench scopes. And for automated testing they are an interesting and also pretty unique proposition.

As a bench/lab scope, not so much.

Quote
Does this mean typical common oscilloscope format (front end, processing, screen, front panel) will be changed to modular instruments in near future?

No. Why, just because Tek did it with that particular scope (which clearly has been designed of a certain niche inside what already is a niche market)? What makes you think that this has any impact on bench scopes?
 

Offline aat24

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Re: "Low noise" 70/33 GHz scopes from Tektronix
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2015, 10:40:56 pm »
The new Tek 70 GHz "Low noise" scope will be mainly used in development of "high-speed coherent optical systems" as you can read here: http://oscopes.info/news/2306-tektronix-announces-70-ghz-real-time-oscilloscope

Price is starting at €250,000 - only affordable for "leading edge research". The small display and the unusual form factor allows to stack two instruments and get the inputs very close to the UUT. Also the scope features a "precise multi-instrument timing synchronization" named UltraSync for high-speed multi-channel acquisitions i.e. multiple instruments coupled for measurements on high-speed coherent optical systems.

The new Tek "Low noise" scope really looks a bit strange - I saw it some days ago.
 

Offline w2aew

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Re: "Low noise" 70/33 GHz scopes from Tektronix
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2015, 02:15:51 am »
As stated earlier - a 70GHz scope such as this is typically used for applications such as ultra high speed coherent optical transmission system analysis, as well as millimeter wave RF applications, etc.  In these applications, the scope is not being used in an interactive way with the user, it is primarily used as a digitizer/analyzer for some automated higher level analysis - so no real need for a large display.  The small form factor also makes it easier to get the scope close to the device under test - especially important because the losses in the coax cable connecting the DUT to the scope can be substantial - so every effort needs to be made to minimize the length of the these cables.

Another feature of the form factor for this scope is that is designed to be scalable.  Two, three or four units can be synchronized together, with channel to channel skew as good as having all of the channels in a single unit (which would have to be much larger).
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Offline Hugoneus

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Re: "Low noise" 70/33 GHz scopes from Tektronix
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2015, 02:38:22 am »
As stated earlier - a 70GHz scope such as this is typically used for applications such as ultra high speed coherent optical transmission system analysis, as well as millimeter wave RF applications, etc.  In these applications, the scope is not being used in an interactive way with the user, it is primarily used as a digitizer/analyzer for some automated higher level analysis - so no real need for a large display.  The small form factor also makes it easier to get the scope close to the device under test - especially important because the losses in the coax cable connecting the DUT to the scope can be substantial - so every effort needs to be made to minimize the length of the these cables.

Another feature of the form factor for this scope is that is designed to be scalable.  Two, three or four units can be synchronized together, with channel to channel skew as good as having all of the channels in a single unit (which would have to be much larger).

Congratulations for releasing this. I have been eager to see it since I heard about it.

Offline electr_peter

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Re: "Low noise" 70/33 GHz scopes from Tektronix
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2015, 06:59:18 am »
Why, just because Tek did it with that particular scope (which clearly has been designed of a certain niche inside what already is a niche market)? What makes you think that this has any impact on bench scopes?
As stated in above post, these high performance scopes are meant to be used very close to signal being measured and be configurable/stackable to get synchronization/more performance out of them. Thus the need for relative small size and semi-remote control.

This, of course does not change anything for bench scopes, but it adds possibility to have a proper small modular scope. Bench scopes are big box/brick shape but they could be made much slimmer if screen and control surfaces were to be detached as separate modules.
Basic scope could consist of only small and slim acquisition/processing unit with video out. You could then add external screen and external control module if you like. This could allow much more flexibility in tight workspaces as processing unit/display/control unit can be placed in different locations in the lab. Kitchen comes with built-in heat plate, lab could come with built-in scope :D

Admittedly, it would still be a niche application, but I think Chris from TheAmpHour would like to have such form factor scope for his portable lab.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2015, 07:01:06 am by electr_peter »
 

Offline Wuerstchenhund

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Re: "Low noise" 70/33 GHz scopes from Tektronix
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2015, 12:27:09 pm »
As stated in above post, these high performance scopes are meant to be used very close to signal being measured and be configurable/stackable to get synchronization/more performance out of them. Thus the need for relative small size and semi-remote control.

Well, really, a lot of scopes are used "very close to the signal being measured", that's nothing new for ultra high bandwidth scopes like these. It's also not the reason for the small size (the LeCroy LabMaster is certainly also used "very close to the signal being measured", and it's digitizer blocks are much larger).

The reason why these Tek scopes are so small is primarily because they are designed for rack use (something you can't do with a LabMaster, which is essentially its own rack). Useage in ATEs is also the reason why Tek focused on remote control-ability.

Quote
This, of course does not change anything for bench scopes, but it adds possibility to have a proper small modular scope. Bench scopes are big box/brick shape but they could be made much slimmer if screen and control surfaces were to be detached as separate modules.

There already are lots of modular scopes out there, and have been for decades.

Quote
Basic scope could consist of only small and slim acquisition/processing unit with video out. You could then add external screen and external control module if you like. This could allow much more flexibility in tight workspaces as processing unit/display/control unit can be placed in different locations in the lab. Kitchen comes with built-in heat plate, lab could come with built-in scope :D

As I said, stuff like that already exists for a very long time. The problem with modular kit is that it is very expensive compared to integrated units, and because modular scopes are predominantly used in ATEs or similar environments you usually have to do the legwork yourself in terms of software.
 

Offline ConKbot

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Re: "Low noise" 70/33 GHz scopes from Tektronix
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2015, 12:33:32 pm »
As stated earlier - a 70GHz scope such as this is typically used for applications such as ultra high speed coherent optical transmission system analysis, as well as millimeter wave RF applications, etc.  In these applications, the scope is not being used in an interactive way with the user, it is primarily used as a digitizer/analyzer for some automated higher level analysis - so no real need for a large display.  The small form factor also makes it easier to get the scope close to the device under test - especially important because the losses in the coax cable connecting the DUT to the scope can be substantial - so every effort needs to be made to minimize the length of the these cables.

Another feature of the form factor for this scope is that is designed to be scalable.  Two, three or four units can be synchronized together, with channel to channel skew as good as having all of the channels in a single unit (which would have to be much larger).

Congratulations for releasing this. I have been eager to see it since I heard about it.

Ok, now for a tour of this factory too  ;D
 


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