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Multimeters that do not appear to meet their safety specs. (updated frequently)

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AVGresponding:

--- Quote from: GreenHW_GUY on October 30, 2019, 04:00:55 am ---why can a cheap china junk multimeter end up on 1. place and a okay Fluke multimeter end as a 10. place here https://www.smarthome.guide/best-multimeters/

--- End quote ---


The numbers only represent the order they looked at them, not the order they placed.

They gave each one an individual 'award'.

The Fluke 87V was awarded 'Best professional' multimeter.

Still, I will agree that they didn't seem to question the safety ratings of the cheaper offerings, and just accepted the manufacturers self-assessment, which most of us here know are often pure fantasy.

HKJ:

--- Quote from: GreenHW_GUY on October 30, 2019, 04:00:55 am ---why can a cheap china junk multimeter end up on 1. place and a okay Fluke multimeter end as a 10. place here https://www.smarthome.guide/best-multimeters/

--- End quote ---

Probably because that brand payed the most.

Specmaster:

--- Quote from: GreenHW_GUY on October 30, 2019, 04:00:55 am ---why can a cheap china junk multimeter end up on 1. place and a okay Fluke multimeter end as a 10. place here https://www.smarthome.guide/best-multimeters/

--- End quote ---
I think the name says it all, smarthome, it is a guide aimed at the average DIY'er at home where bang per buck comes into play and they are not going to pay for the extra protection etc that a Fluke meter is going offer over a cheap meter that will do the same perceved job but at a far greater risk to both the meter and the user in the event of something going. You just are not going to find on the cheap chinese / far east meters in any proffesionals tool kit.

EEVblog:

--- Quote from: rsjsouza on August 17, 2018, 08:39:55 pm ---A government could in theory enforce the companies to refrain from doing business with regular offenders, and I am pretty sure they do for the really bad ones (thus the slew of false markings around)

--- End quote ---

Only for regulatory compliance marks like RCM/C-Tick mark here in Australia, or FCC.
UL and ETL are private industry marking that the government does not regulate. UL or ETL would have to privately sue a company for trademark infringement. Although they could potentially get customs to stop product with Trademark infringing label from being imported perhaps.

JPNH20:
Here's the answer to your question, which is buried, in the websites T&Cs:

Amazon Affiliate Program
www.smarthome.guide is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

The Chinese company is paying a higher commission on purchases from affiliates who drive traffic to the product on Amazon. I worked on this type of thing around 2010. Basically there's an equivalent to eBay, for lack of a better example, where companies bid against each other for higher affiliate payouts. The affiliates then choose who has the best payout and drive traffic to the product in hopes that someone make a purchase and they receive their affiliate commission. If you do some Googling around there's tons of these review sites for all kinds of products in top ten formats so they can maximize the chance of a purchase and affiliate commission while still looking legitimate and not putting too many choices in front of the user. A law was passed a few years ago that they now have to disclose the fact they may earn a commission because it was becoming the wild west. However it's usually buried in a disclaimer or T&C statement.

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