Author Topic: A multimeter for electronics,home/car audio or the fluke 116  (Read 4861 times)

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Offline thisguy81

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Hello guys,
First, I would like to congratulate you for this amazing forum. I think its great  :-+
Im graduating (EE) soon, and I finally have some free time. I'm really interested in electronic circuit design.

Im specifically intrested in home/car audio amp's engineering.
Inspired by Dave's great video about setting up your first lab and the gear you might need, I have done quiet a bit of reading/watching reviews but the more I know, the harder it gets.

here is a general idea of the things I'm currently interested in. I ask for your advise as to what equipment I can draw the most benefits from.

1.Im in the process of building an headphones amp. (ordered the parts)
2.would like to get familiar with testing and trouble shooting home/car audio amps.
3.want to be able to trouble shoot test and repair all kind of consumer electronics.
4.arduino and other fruits that has to do with developing electronics hardware

I would like to get a couple of DMM'S a soldering station and a scope.
I want at least one of my meter's to work as a reference. So i can make sure my readings are decent.
I was looking on the fluke 116 since it has TRMS,microamps and relatively decent price,but i could not find any reviews on it.

BTW, anyone knows whats the C in fluke 116c means ? is there a real difference between them ?

Any help will be much appreciated.

« Last Edit: June 06, 2014, 03:20:33 am by thisguy81 »
"I'm not crazy, I'm just smarter than you..."
 

Offline AG6QR

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Re: A multimeter for electronics,home/car audio or the fluke 116
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2014, 04:18:42 am »
Be aware that the microamps function in that meter is high impedance, so not well suited for low power circuits.  It is intended for HVAC technicians, who can use it to diagnose flame sensors in gas fired appliances.  A flame sensor uses high voltage and very low current, so a high impedance (high burden voltage) microamp range works OK there. 

I own the predecessor to that meter, the Fluke 16.  It doesn't have many functions, but it performs its few functions well, with very nice speed and ergonomics.  It has a very similar high impedance microamp range.  And of course it's very rugged and well protected.

A glaring omission from the 116 (and my old model 16) is a 10A current range, or a current range in the neighborhood of hundreds of mA.  For general purpose electronics, I suspect you'll want those current ranges, and that's more useful than a microamp range, regardless of the microamp range burden voltage.
 

Offline Lightages

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Re: A multimeter for electronics,home/car audio or the fluke 116
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2014, 04:56:10 am »
Can you give us a clue what price range you are looking at and where you live?
 

Offline thisguy81

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Re: A multimeter for electronics,home/car audio or the fluke 116
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2014, 11:03:38 am »
Hi AG6QR,
I see what you mean, I guess ill move on. Thanks for the heads up.

Hi Lightages, Im from Israel and my original budget is based on Dave video and is about 1200$. ~400$ for the oscilloscope, 150$ for the reference meter
and about 50-60 $ for the secondery meter.

The rest of the budget is dedicated for basic signal generator some DIY power supplies kits and miscellaneous which hopefully you guys will be able to help me with your recommendations and insights.

Thank you.



« Last Edit: June 06, 2014, 11:05:16 am by thisguy81 »
"I'm not crazy, I'm just smarter than you..."
 



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