Author Topic: Actually using a thermography camera  (Read 1312 times)

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Offline babysitter

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Actually using a thermography camera
« on: March 17, 2015, 05:02:08 am »
Hi Folks,

I just requested a FLIR E60 at work, chances are good the people with the money fold to my wish.
Up to now there are mostly teardown videos. But I want to use it, instead :)

Any hints for successful operation?

I am aware of the problems with reflecting surfaces.
I am looking into a method to get a good uniform, constant and ideally known emissivity.
Is there any suggestion how to paint or cover parts to get them to emit the right thing(tm)?

My idea is using black printer toner, maybe to a warmish surface that its resin contents like to hold to the part under test. However, I haven't yet checked if i sticks and - what would be bad - the layer is conductive.

Also, as lenses are made sometimes of GaAs, I have a 8ish inch wafer at hand. I dont want to cut it up but after using a remote control and digicam to confirm the estimated IR transmissivity, I guess I could use it as a window to reduce air drafts, right?

I'm not a feature, I'm a bug! ARC DG3HDA
 

Offline AndyC_772

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Re: Actually using a thermography camera
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2015, 09:58:38 am »
Black insulating tape. Just stick a piece to any reflective surface you want to measure.

Offline -jeffB

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Re: Actually using a thermography camera
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2015, 05:38:19 pm »
Also, as lenses are made sometimes of GaAs, I have a 8ish inch wafer at hand. I dont want to cut it up but after using a remote control and digicam to confirm the estimated IR transmissivity, I guess I could use it as a window to reduce air drafts, right?

Well, the near-IR used by remotes is a lot shorter-wave, but it looks like GaAs should be more transparent in the thermal IR range, with a nice flat transmission profile from 2 to 12 or so microns. It's certainly worth a try.
 


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