Author Topic: PicoScope 2000  (Read 14085 times)

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Offline MrW0lf

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Re: PicoScope 2000
« Reply #50 on: November 07, 2018, 07:38:26 am »
Were you able to install both PS5 and PS6 on 1 pc?

Yes but something is little weird with some PS6 menus now. However I have windows GUI scaling on and just installed some Win patches also so dunno. Functionally both seem to work as far as messed with so far. In itself PS5 is of course very crude compared to PS6. I point attention to this mainly so people would notice and perhaps some good stuff would be resurrected due to public demand.

 

Online _Wim_

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Re: PicoScope 2000
« Reply #51 on: November 07, 2018, 07:44:44 am »
Were you able to install both PS5 and PS6 on 1 pc?
I point attention to this mainly so people would notice and perhaps some good stuff would be resurrected due to public demand.
Good idea, I was very supprized to hear they use to have a "normal" persistance mode, this is one thing I find much better on my Rigol than on the Pico. The current implementation I find useless for my kind of work.
 

Offline MrW0lf

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Re: PicoScope 2000
« Reply #52 on: December 11, 2018, 05:29:20 am »
PS6 lacks wfm - wfm timing measurements so must invent own, heres unsigned delta(ChX,ChY) to avoid hassle with cursors:

ChB=1MHz sine, ChC=1MHz square, ~45° phase. Measurement matches cursors. Operating in good conditions (no noise).


ChB=1MHz sine, ChC=1MHz sine, ~15° phase. Additional function plots delay graph. Graph little corrupted by noise. DC average on non-plotting function is more accurate.


ChB=1MHz sine, ChC=1.01MHz sine. Graph gives general picture.


To avoid noise issues it may make sense to lower sampling rate, apply resolution enhancement, filter etc. I just demonstrated default situation.

Math for non graphing (PWM):
((((atan(1/tan(pi*(B/10000)))/pi)+(B/10000))*-((atan(1/tan(pi*(C/10000)))/pi)+(C/10000)))+0.25)*(1/freq(C))

Math for graphing version:
duty((((atan(1/tan(pi*(B/10000)))/pi)+(B/10000))*-((atan(1/tan(pi*(C/10000)))/pi)+(C/10000))))*(1/200)*(1/freq(C))

It works by finding zero crossings which results in PWM which can be further processed and graphed using duty(x).
« Last Edit: December 11, 2018, 05:34:32 am by MrW0lf »
 


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