Author Topic: Chinese IC Testers  (Read 20084 times)

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Offline Dawn

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Chinese IC Testers
« on: August 04, 2013, 07:13:57 am »
On the 'bay, there's been several IC testers that claim to be able to check cmos,ttl,some linear, and identify tranistors. The price is surpising low with shipping on these. They are simple boxes with a few membrane keys, a multi-line display and a ZIF socket. Has anyone had any experience with these? I need to do some bulk sorting and something like this would be a godsend if it works well.

Here's an example:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Digital-LCD-Transistor-Tester-Detector-IC-Tester-Maintenance-Meter-PNP-NPN-MOS-/181135316354?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a2c819582#ht_2593wt_918
 

Offline Thor-Arne

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2013, 07:34:20 am »
I don't know about that tester, but the test function in the MiniPro TL866 is able to check a lot of IC's.
Dave has a review of the programmer here.

The interesting point is if this or other testers can detect all problems with the IC, I expect that these cheap testers only do a function check of the device.
Any periodic or thermal issues will not be detected in that case.
 

Offline caius

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2013, 10:02:18 pm »
I don't know about that tester, but the test function in the MiniPro TL866 is able to check a lot of IC's.
Dave has a review of the programmer here.

The interesting point is if this or other testers can detect all problems with the IC, I expect that these cheap testers only do a function check of the device.
Any periodic or thermal issues will not be detected in that case.

I have a TL866CS EPROM programmer and I can confirm it can test ICs (SRAM, TTL, CMOS) but regarding TTL not all the 74 family is supported for testing as well the unknown IC search function is not yet implemented.
 

Offline edavid

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2013, 03:18:11 am »
On the 'bay, there's been several IC testers that claim to be able to check cmos,ttl,some linear, and identify tranistors. The price is surpising low with shipping on these. They are simple boxes with a few membrane keys, a multi-line display and a ZIF socket. Has anyone had any experience with these? I need to do some bulk sorting and something like this would be a godsend if it works well.

Here's an example:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Digital-LCD-Transistor-Tester-Detector-IC-Tester-Maintenance-Meter-PNP-NPN-MOS-/181135316354?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a2c819582#ht_2593wt_918

Has anyone been able to dig up a manual, spec sheet, or device list for these?  (The IC tester, not the MiniPro!)
« Last Edit: August 05, 2013, 03:31:28 pm by edavid »
 

Offline caius

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2013, 07:27:00 am »
 

Offline Dawn

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2013, 03:29:27 pm »
I'm aware of the minpro, but that's not what I'm looking for. The amount of these units sold, I'm surpised nobody here has any direct knowledge of them or any reviews on websites. I didn't mean for this to turn into a minipro discussion.
 

Offline bobkat2769

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2013, 06:03:07 pm »
I recently got one of those cheap testers on ebay a few weeks ago and I'm still getting to know it. But so far I've been very pleased with it.

When I did a teardown I discovered that the printing on the board says it is an "ABI ChipMaster" but it doesn't quite match any of their current models.

I've never found a full device list for this device and I still haven't gotten around to throwing my extensive IC collection at it. But I've been using it off and on to test all of my opto isolator/interrupter devices along with several hundred (prolly over 1000   :-/O) SMD ICs from a couple of 2 pound Jameco IC grab bags using SOIC adapter sockets.

In that collection of prolly about 1000 SMD ICs it was able to test about half of the analog types and nearly all of the digital types. Of the half it couldn't test those were nearly all voltage regulators and SMPS chips which it doesn't test. I wish it did test them with as many of them that I have now. Testing those with what I have manually would take way too much time.  |O/ :-DMM

It seems to handle most common glue logic families. 54/74XX, CMOS 4XXX, HEF 40XX, 45XX/145XX.

I've tested quite a few TTL chips but I've already found that there are a few weird holes in the devices it can test. There are a few common older Flip-Flops that it doesn't support, but other newer and less common ones, it can test. =o.O=;;

I also found that there seems to be a bug in the TTL test/ID routines. Several LS and HCT types will both ID and test as the opposite family. If you try testing them in the proper family it will fail, but test it on the other family and it will pass. My experience has been that it seems that the best way to use this device is to first use the auto-search function to have it ID the chip and then test with the type it gave you.

There were a few Op Amps that were like this too. Where they would ID and test as a slightly different number than what the actually are. And several analog types that aren't in the short list of chips for analog testing will actually test under other numbers. So, with the analog chips too, for best results you'll want to ID the DUT first and then test with what it thinks it is.

For analog chips it mostly tests a few common types of Op Amps & comparators. It will also test a few common types of display driver and interface chips as well. But, this is mostly a digital logic tester.

The Zener test seems to work fairly well up to 50V but I haven't tested it extensively yet.

I have fully tested the opto device function. It works very well and will tell you the voltage it gets from the photodiode side of the optoisolator/interrupter when you test.

It has a transistor test function, but I'll likely never use it. I have several dedicated transistor testers already.

I sort of started putting together a manual for it, but lost interest after a while as it was very easy to use aside from a few oddities.

For example, for all IC tests you put the DUT in the top half of the socket with pin 1 at the top left. Which is really nice as a lot of testers expect you to put the DUT in differently depending on the number of pins from the bottom.  :wtf:

For all the other tests (opto, Zener, Transistor) you put the DUT in the bottom part of the socket.

Zener & Transistors go in the socket in the bottom of the right column. For opto devices the LED goes in the bottom left holes & the photo diode/transistor goes in the bottom right holes.

Once you get used to it this setup is very simple and consistent. I like it.  :-+ =^.^=

If any one would like me to post teardown photos and/or finish the manual let me know and I'll put them up here.

If anyone has any questions about this device I'll try to answer them if I can.

BobKat
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Offline calexanian

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2013, 06:13:10 pm »
This sets of my snake oil alarm instantly...
Charles Alexanian
Alex-Tronix Control Systems
 

Offline Dawn

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2013, 08:33:19 pm »
Thanks for the heads up. I still haven't bought one yet, hoping to hear from someone who has.
Really appreciate your review of the units.
 

Offline Rasz

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2013, 09:04:40 pm »
This sets of my snake oil alarm instantly...

nah its legit
 you need to enter model number before testing, it doesnt autodetect chips (only transistors)
but WHY BOTHER? ttl chips are $.2 and you want to waste $70 for a gizmo + your time testing those?
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Offline amyk

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2013, 10:21:16 pm »
This sets of my snake oil alarm instantly...

nah its legit
 you need to enter model number before testing, it doesnt autodetect chips (only transistors)
but WHY BOTHER? ttl chips are $.2 and you want to waste $70 for a gizmo + your time testing those?
Sorting ICs for recycling, I'm pretty sure it pays itself off rather quickly...
 

Offline Rasz

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2013, 10:44:52 pm »
who uses recycled $0.2 parts?!?!?!?!?
you would need to recycle >400 of those, not to mention no life at all, even flipping burgers is more profitable than this. Unless you live in Philipines/Guangdong/Africa.
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Offline Dawn

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2013, 11:08:09 pm »
I guess some people have never worked in an industry that replacement components are usually marked with proprietary house numbers instead of the generic. While cross references often carry well known part numbers from consumer equipment, those of us that work in commerical fields aren't so lucky and at the mercy of the manufacturers. Add to that companies that provide manuals with schematics and parts lists and if you try to order an active component, parts replacement is only at board level even though part numbers are assigned to each. My life would be much easier if the generic p/n's were listed. The reverse of that is I have years of inventory under house numbers and it would be nice to dispose of some of this with a generic equivelent part number.
 

Offline Rasz

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2013, 11:41:11 pm »
I guess some people have never worked in an industry that replacement components are usually marked with proprietary house numbers instead of the generic. While cross references often carry well known part numbers from consumer equipment, those of us that work in commerical fields aren't so lucky and at the mercy of the manufacturers. Add to that companies that provide manuals with schematics and parts lists and if you try to order an active component, parts replacement is only at board level even though part numbers are assigned to each. My life would be much easier if the generic p/n's were listed. The reverse of that is I have years of inventory under house numbers and it would be nice to dispose of some of this with a generic equivelent part number.

and how is that Chinese box help you? It will not automagically identify what you put in it, you will need to know beforehand what IC you hold in your hand.
Either you know compatible model number and can order $0.2 part, or you dont and this chinese gizmo wont do anything for you.
Who logs in to gdm? Not I, said the duck.
My fireplace is on fire, but in all the wrong places.
 

Offline calexanian

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #14 on: December 02, 2013, 04:01:02 am »
Again. This sets off my snake oil alarm. Just looks bad and unsupportable. Even if the thing works who is going to support it and prepare for Chinglish writing. When an $.80 micro can do anything any anything designed up through 1995 can do, I mean just nooo... whyyyy..... Your time is more valuable than that!
Charles Alexanian
Alex-Tronix Control Systems
 

Offline bobkat2769

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2013, 10:24:29 pm »
It seems we either have a couple of n00bs or a pair of trolls here. Anyway... =^.^=;;

Either you weren't paying attention, or I wasn't clear enough about the search function.  :palm:

When using the "Search" function This device will automatically detect any of the devices that it supports and can test. I've found that it will even ID quite a few devices that aren't in the supported list. =^.^=

For those of us like myself that enjoy tearing down old electronics and re-using the parts or buying IC grab bags for cheap parts this device is a real time and money saver. Especially when you consider the time saved testing your parts.

And when dealing with boards from companies like RCA and HP where they'll use standard JEDEC/US parts but put weird part numbers on them and then not have the numbers on the parts even match the numbers in the service manuals or their own cross-references this device is a real life saver. Rather than having to spend $10 to $50 for a part from HP you can just use the 10 to 90 cent TTL part or Op Amp that it actually is.  ;D

The only thing I don't like about this tester is that you can't plug it into a PC and add devices. But considering that "real" programmable IC testers typically start at $1200 US and go way way up in price I think it is good value for money for those of us that know what to do with them.

As to the value of recycling old parts, a lot of us do this as a hobby. You know, for FUN, and not to just make money. While I've earned my living in the past doing electronics repair and some design work, I've always been into electronics because I find the subject fascinating and I've always enjoyed tinkering/experimenting and working with circuits.  :-/O :-DMM

(And, yes, I AM having way too much fun with the silly smileys =^.^=;;)

It has never just been about money for me. And it looks to me as if that is your mindset. If money is the only reason you're doing electronics then you're definitely both in the wrong field and in the wrong place.
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Online eliocor

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2013, 11:21:23 pm »
And when dealing with boards from companies like RCA and HP where they'll use standard JEDEC/US parts but put weird part numbers on them and then not have the numbers on the parts even match the numbers in the service manuals or their own cross-references this device is a real life saver. Rather than having to spend $10 to $50 for a part from HP you can just use the 10 to 90 cent TTL part or Op Amp that it actually is.  ;D

Here is the conundrum:  >:D
- if you need to replace your "unknown" chip, it means it is faulty...
- If it is faulty how can you test and identify it?
 

Offline deth502

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2013, 03:54:36 am »
And when dealing with boards from companies like RCA and HP where they'll use standard JEDEC/US parts but put weird part numbers on them and then not have the numbers on the parts even match the numbers in the service manuals or their own cross-references this device is a real life saver. Rather than having to spend $10 to $50 for a part from HP you can just use the 10 to 90 cent TTL part or Op Amp that it actually is.  ;D

Here is the conundrum:  >:D
- if you need to replace your "unknown" chip, it means it is faulty...
- If it is faulty how can you test and identify it?


this was my thought exactly when considering the usefulness of this device for myself.
 

Offline JoeO

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2013, 06:15:19 am »
And when dealing with boards from companies like RCA and HP where they'll use standard JEDEC/US parts but put weird part numbers on them and then not have the numbers on the parts even match the numbers in the service manuals or their own cross-references this device is a real life saver. Rather than having to spend $10 to $50 for a part from HP you can just use the 10 to 90 cent TTL part or Op Amp that it actually is.  ;D

Here is the conundrum:  >:D
- if you need to replace your "unknown" chip, it means it is faulty...
- If it is faulty how can you test and identify it?
Faulty does not mean dead.  It can test fine on the tester but not work in the circuit.  And vice versa.
There also could be another chip on the board with the exact same weird part number.  You test that one, determine what it is and then replace the one that is bad.
Not everyone has a Radio Shack down the street.  Also when ordering from Digikey or Mouser, a 10 cent part may cost $5 for postage.

Using an IC tester just 5 times, could save a person the cost of the tester.
 
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Offline papabol_24

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #19 on: September 25, 2015, 11:37:34 pm »
Hello, photos of this Chinese IC Tester





IRF630



[imghttp://i.imgur.com/UeYmjvl.jpg]http://[/img]

74hc manual search

[imghttp://i.imgur.com/wc9JtBb.jpg][/img]







Optocoupler



BJT



zener 7v



zener 16v



zener 10v



 :)
 
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Offline kwass

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #20 on: September 26, 2015, 01:26:29 am »
I have one of these:

https://sites.google.com/site/leapleaptronixen/ic_tester/leaper-1

with a different brand name on it (LBT-10) that I got on ebay for around $70.   It works well and is useful if you have a lot of old IC's that need to be tested.  It more than made up for the cost on just one calculator repair that I did on the HP-97S i/o pod.  There's no schematic available for the pod and it uses a ton of HP-part numbered, 4000 series chips.  While I was able to cross reference most of them, I didn't know all of them.  This tester found the two bad chips, that I did have cross references on and helped identify the ones I didn't know.


« Last Edit: September 27, 2015, 03:22:28 am by kwass »
-katie
 

Offline papabol_24

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #21 on: September 26, 2015, 03:59:33 pm »

Great Job kwass,  :-+
 

Offline artico78

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #22 on: March 31, 2016, 08:09:07 pm »
After reading your post, i bought one from england, for now i dont want buy chipmaster and linear master, but i will do in the future. Anyone have tried to test memory chips???
I readed that some componets need capacitors between pin for stabilization otherwise u risk to have a faulty test.

http://www.capetronics.com/linearmaster_ic_tester_library.htm

http://www.capetronics.com/Chipmaster_digital_ic_tester_library.htm

I hope for now to have made a good choice
 

Offline Elektronik

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Re: Chinese IC Testers
« Reply #23 on: August 22, 2018, 08:03:24 am »
Hello everyone

I got me exactly that Chinese IC-Tester some weeks ago and imho it is disappointing.

Here is a german review of the device. DonĀ“t worry about language, the video tells a story.

http://www.afug-info.de/Testberichte/IC-Tester/

Wish I had seen that before I bought that scrap.
 


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