Author Topic: Bench power supply suggestions [intermediate level, undergraduate EE]  (Read 1515 times)

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Offline Mr. Scram

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Re: Bench power supply suggestions [intermediate level, undergraduate EE]
« Reply #50 on: September 24, 2019, 01:29:26 am »
Which is exactly the reason why I shifted my disclosure to my profile and not signature.
It's plainly visible for all to see.

It would seem you get disturbed when someone buys a Siglent product after assessing datasheets from all other competing brands. Are you some <brand> closet fanboy ?
Why do you get upset about making sure people get all the relevant information? According to your own words we both are in favour of informed decisions so there's no need for the salty attitude. I have no issue with Siglent other than you pushing the brand so aggressively and one-sidedly that a lot of noise is introduced. This tends to happen in threads started by newcomers who ask advise and are most susceptible to it. There are many brand representatives who makes themselves useful around here who I don't have any issues with. Coincidentally they're a lot less zealous and better at providing information in a neutral manner.
 
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Online nctnico

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Re: Bench power supply suggestions [intermediate level, undergraduate EE]
« Reply #51 on: September 24, 2019, 08:13:15 am »
Overall, I much prefer the DP832(A) but it is bigger and heavier if that's an issue for you.

The old color monitors (think Sony MultiSync CRT type) and linear power supplies share one thing in common:  You buy quality by the pound.  A heavier supply is better than a lighter supply. For the PS, you're buying a more robust transformer and more heatsinking.  The weigh difference isn't in the PCBs themselves, it's in the metal stuff.  More weight is good!
No. Think about (efficient) torroidal transformer versus an old style one. Also more weight can mean cheaper steel enclosure instead of aluminium. Either way heavy equipment is a nuisance to move around.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline GerryR

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Re: Bench power supply suggestions [intermediate level, undergraduate EE]
« Reply #52 on: September 24, 2019, 11:28:53 am »
The older "stuff" is straight-forward and easier to use.  I would gather that most of the features of these newer supplies, very few people will use, but the displays look pretty.  I don't care what the supply "says" the output is, or to how many digits, I always check the outputs with a calibrated multi-meter before hooking up to a circuit; it's just good practice.  I think there is a tendency for some to go for appearance as much as anything else.  Features like "sense" inputs on a bench supply(??), maybe if your test setup is across the room, but not on a bench.  Just measure the voltage at the destination and tweak the supply, if necessary.  CC / CV definitely a must and independent grounds, very convenient.  Weight is good, if for nothing else but to keep the unit from moving when you go to change a control setting.  (I have a newer ARB that slides away from my hand when I go to depress a button; most annoying.  My older, less capable ARB would'nt do that.  There is a lot to be said for the industrially hardened equipment instead of what is being passed off today.  Just my $.02.
Still learning; good judgment come from experience, which comes from bad judgment!!
 

Online nctnico

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Re: Bench power supply suggestions [intermediate level, undergraduate EE]
« Reply #53 on: September 24, 2019, 01:05:47 pm »
The older "stuff" is straight-forward and easier to use.  I would gather that most of the features of these newer supplies, very few people will use, but the displays look pretty.  I don't care what the supply "says" the output is, or to how many digits, I always check the outputs with a calibrated multi-meter before hooking up to a circuit; it's just good practice.
Not in today's world. For older PSUs with 2.5 digit readouts for voltage and current or a scale you'd need to check the output voltages. But nowadays the higher end bench power supplies come with 4.5 digits DMMs built-in for both current and voltage. Especially the current is a good one because unlike a DMM a power supply doesn't have any extra burden voltage. Also you may want to change the voltage in between or use the PSU the next day again. Do you really want to pull out a DMM and check every output voltage and current of a power supply? It is a real nuisance to have to work that way.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline 2N3055

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Re: Bench power supply suggestions [intermediate level, undergraduate EE]
« Reply #54 on: September 24, 2019, 01:15:11 pm »
The older "stuff" is straight-forward and easier to use.  I would gather that most of the features of these newer supplies, very few people will use, but the displays look pretty.  I don't care what the supply "says" the output is, or to how many digits, I always check the outputs with a calibrated multi-meter before hooking up to a circuit; it's just good practice.
Not in today's world. For older PSUs with 2.5 digit readouts for voltage and current or a scale you'd need to check the output voltages. But nowadays the higher end bench power supplies come with 4.5 digits DMMs built-in for both current and voltage. Especially the current is a good one because unlike a DMM a power supply doesn't have any extra burden voltage. Also you may want to change the voltage in between or use the PSU the next day again. Do you really want to pull out a DMM and check every output voltage and current of a power supply? It is a real nuisance to have to work that way.

To be more precise, if you have something like DP831/832 you get 3 x voltage and current and power. That is 9 measurements that are just there with no effort.
I use my DP831 ALL the time just because of that.. And resolution is enough that you don't need anything else most of the time.
And Keysight 36300 and 36100 series have low range current mode that is good enough to measure low power devices with full range scale range of several mA...

 
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