Author Topic: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?  (Read 38230 times)

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Offline jesuscf

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #50 on: February 07, 2016, 05:52:38 pm »
Although I bought the USB Interface Kit to communicate with the BM869s multimeter, I decided to give the information posted in this topic a try and built myself a serial interface adapter using an IR LED and photo transistor together with a C8051F38C micro-controller and FT230 USB to serial adapter.   Attached are some pictures.  Probably the most useful thing I can share is how I made the IR adapter.  I used a few pieces of 1/32 single sided PCB copper clad (very easy to cut with scissors!)  to attach the IR LED (QED123) and photo transistor (QSD124).  The long pins of the LED and photo transistor were bent to add some 'spring' to the adapter for a firm but gentle fit to the BM869s.  Hopefully the roundness and softness of both the LED and photo transistor would prevent any scratches to the adapter window of the BM869s.  Finally, I encased the whole adapter with pieces of PCB to make it more robust.  The PuTTY screen capture shows the response to some of the commands I implemented in my program: '*idn?', 'meas?', 'meas1?', 'meas2?', 'print', Ctrl+c,  'meas?' (after changing the selection to ohms), and 'meas?' (after changing the selection to temperature).

Homer: Kids, there's three ways to do things; the right way, the wrong way and the Max Power way!
Bart: Isn't that the wrong way?
Homer: Yeah, but faster!
 

Offline markone

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #51 on: February 08, 2016, 12:13:01 am »
Although I bought the USB Interface Kit to communicate with the BM869s multimeter, I decided to give the information posted in this topic a try and built myself a serial interface adapter using an IR LED and photo transistor together with a C8051F38C micro-controller and FT230 USB to serial adapter.   Attached are some pictures.  Probably the most useful thing I can share is how I made the IR adapter.  I used a few pieces of 1/32 single sided PCB copper clad (very easy to cut with scissors!)  to attach the IR LED (QED123) and photo transistor (QSD124).  The long pins of the LED and photo transistor were bent to add some 'spring' to the adapter for a firm but gentle fit to the BM869s.  Hopefully the roundness and softness of both the LED and photo transistor would prevent any scratches to the adapter window of the BM869s.  Finally, I encased the whole adapter with pieces of PCB to make it more robust.  The PuTTY screen capture shows the response to some of the commands I implemented in my program: '*idn?', 'meas?', 'meas1?', 'meas2?', 'print', Ctrl+c,  'meas?' (after changing the selection to ohms), and 'meas?' (after changing the selection to temperature).

Nice job.

I too have the BM869 and it's USB cable (BU-86X) with whom i have a problem :  i'm not able to see it as a COM port under Windows 10.

It's logging program works but it's useless for me, i know that the USB cable has inside a Cypress CY7C63743 and it's supported by SigRok, but i have to write a Labview driver .... |O

 

Offline jesuscf

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #52 on: February 20, 2016, 04:09:45 pm »
Yesterday night I made another IR adapter for the BM869s multimeter.  I took some pictures of the process, so here they are:

Step01.jpg: I already started when I realized I may as well take some pictures and share them in the eevblog forum.  I am using 1/32" single sided copper clad pcb. 1/16" pcb is too thick for the BM869s.

Step02.jpg: This picture shows the dimensions of the base and the location of the holes for the IR LED and photo transistor. 

Step03.jpg: The holes are 4mm in diameter.

Step04.jpg: I needed to file the base a bit so it fits the BM869s.

Step05.jpg: This picture shows the location of the isolated pads for the IR LED and photo transistor.

Step06.jpg: I used an Xacto knife and small file to create the pads.  It took some time.  Etching may have been faster.

Step07.jpg: This picture shows the IR LED and photo transistor with the leads bent before soldering to the base.

Step08.jpg: The IR LED and photo transistor are soldered to the base.  I use Pb free solder!

Step09.jpg: A four conductor ribbon cable is soldered to each of the pad.

Step10.jpg: Time to make the 'case'.  Let start with the sides.

Step11.jpg: The two sides cut to size.

Step12.jpg: The two sides are soldered to the base.

Step13.jpg: The top is sketched in the pcb.

Step14.jpg: The top is attached with two pieces of wire.  The wires are solder to the top as shown in this picture.

Step15.jpg: The top is soldered to the sides.  Note how I bent the ribbon cable to provide some strain relief.

Step16.jpg: Another view of the almost finished adapter.

Step17.jpg: The adapter was a bit loose in the BM869s, so a couple of drops of solder were added to the sides for a firmer fit.

step18.jpg: The completed adapter in the BM869s.

Homer: Kids, there's three ways to do things; the right way, the wrong way and the Max Power way!
Bart: Isn't that the wrong way?
Homer: Yeah, but faster!
 

Offline jesuscf

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #53 on: February 21, 2016, 08:40:44 am »
In order to make it more accessible, I ported my C program to communicate with the BM869s and decode its output to the Arduino board.  It is my first Arduino program ever... but it apparently works as expected.   I don't think .ino files can be uploaded to the forum  :-//  so I renamed the source code 'bm869s.ino' to 'bm869.ino.c'.  If you want to use it back with the Arduino IDE you have to rename the 'c' file back to just 'ino'.  Also, attached to this post are: a simple circuit diagram, a picture of the connection of the IR adapter (described previously) and the Arduino (using a breadboard), and the output from some commands as displayed in the Arduino IDE terminal.

Note: I arbitrarily selected TX_PIN as pin 12 and RX_PIN as pin 11 in the Arduino board.
Homer: Kids, there's three ways to do things; the right way, the wrong way and the Max Power way!
Bart: Isn't that the wrong way?
Homer: Yeah, but faster!
 

Offline jesuscf

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #54 on: February 22, 2016, 12:06:49 am »
Finally, here is a python script to display the data coming from the BM869s via the Arduino.  Once again I had to rename the file from 'stripchart_BM869s.py' to 'stripchart_BM869s.py.c'.  So before using it don't forget to rename the file so it has the .py extension!  The attached image shows the output of the script.

Note: I already fixed a couple of bugs in the script from the first upload.

Note 2: Added script that works with Python 3.x
« Last Edit: June 19, 2016, 04:53:38 pm by jesuscf »
Homer: Kids, there's three ways to do things; the right way, the wrong way and the Max Power way!
Bart: Isn't that the wrong way?
Homer: Yeah, but faster!
 

Offline jadew

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #55 on: March 15, 2016, 11:11:32 pm »
@jesuscf

Nice job! your adapters look much better than mine.

Here's what I did:
 

Offline t1d

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #56 on: May 11, 2016, 01:27:23 am »
Yes, I am aware that this is an old thread.

This is a pdf drawing of a prototype Eagle board that I intend to post to this thread. It is intended to use the design, posted earlier, with its specification of through-hole IR LED components and the needed Resistors, mounted vertically, on SMD pads. I still need to print out a scaled drawing and verify that all of the dimensions are correct. I will not be providing a schematic, because it is available in early postings and having a schematic tied to the board limits the tricks that I used to configure the board.

I suggest using OSH Park for production of the board. They will do all of the critical cutting, for the board profile, and their solder resist coatings are superior to the Chinese houses. I think that the stronger coating will last longer on the connector’s twist-lock surfaces. I may post the Eagle files, there, also.

I did not include a ground plane. This will aid in tweaking the board thickness, to mate with the lock bracket. I suggest having the board made in the thickest, no-up-charge plastic. If it is too thick for the lock bracket, it can be easily sanded. If it is too thin, the plastic can be built up with super glue and baking soda; this makes an excellent faux plastic. Just apply SG to the board and sprinkle on the BS. Repeat and sand, as necessary.

Things that would be helpful:
-   If you would like an alternate board, having a lower profile, I need the make, model number and distributor for SMD style IR LED and Resistor components. 0805 size resistors should be “solderable,” by hand. The IR LED components will need to have solder pads on the top corners of their bases, to facilitate inverting them on the PCB. I don’t play with LEDs much, so maybe you know about these components better than I do…
-   Verification of the IR LED Resistor value… 150 Ohm, down from 330 Ohm?
-   My controller will be a PIC18F4550, as I have already developed it for other projects. I recall that someone was using an 18f series PIC. I would very much like that c code, if it was developed.
-   If anyone developed a computer-side program in Java, I would love to have that, also…
-   Any suggestions you have.

I look forward to working on this project with you.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2016, 04:20:50 am by t1d »
 

Offline jadew

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #57 on: May 12, 2016, 03:59:31 am »
Ok, a couple of notes:

1) If you used the schematic from post #41, you got the TX path wrong, but it should work like that too, only that you would use the MCU as a sink instead of a source.
2) The LEDs are IR, not UV. Odds are it won't work with UV LEDs, since it's made to block visible light and UV is on the other side of the spectrum.
3) You should probably make a piece of plastic that fits in there first, measure it and then try to get a PCB of that thickness.

About the resistors, I went by trial and error, I guess it depends on the voltage you'll use and on the LEDs themselves. The reason one resistor is 330 Ohms and another one is 150 is because I needed more current in the TX one, but "less" pulldown for RX (so higher resistance).

For the record, I'm happy with my ghetto adapter.

Cheers
 

Offline t1d

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #58 on: May 12, 2016, 04:33:14 am »
1) If you used the schematic from post #41, you got the TX path wrong, but it should work like that too, only that you would use the MCU as a sink instead of a source.
Good catch! I will correct it.
2) The LEDs are IR, not UV. Odds are it won't work with UV LEDs, since it's made to block visible light and UV is on the other side of the spectrum.
Doh! Yes, IR not UV. I have edited my prior post.
3) You should probably make a piece of plastic that fits in there first, measure it and then try to get a PCB of that thickness.
I have a small piece of OSH Park board. I will use it to check the thickness. Great suggestion.
About the resistors, I went by trial and error, I guess it depends on the voltage you'll use and on the LEDs themselves. The reason one resistor is 330 Ohms and another one is 150 is because I needed more current in the TX one, but "less" pulldown for RX (so higher resistance).
Well, I don't have to specify their values on the board, so folks can use whatever they need.

The price for OSH Park boards, of the current profile, is less than $5/shipped/QTY(3). That's cheap enough...

Thank you so much for your help! You made lots of really good points.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2016, 04:35:31 am by t1d »
 

Offline Jacek_Paw

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #59 on: May 12, 2016, 07:34:43 am »
If you already know that Brymen uses rs232 why don't you just use some RS232 sniffing computer software like Free Serial Port Monitor (HHD Software)?
 

Offline t1d

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #60 on: May 12, 2016, 05:17:17 pm »
@ Jadew

1) I was using JesusCF's schematic from post #54, because I thought it was the most recent. I didn't really study it out, but I think you are correct... The TX pin out would be configured to start low, go high when transmitting, through the Resistor and LED and on to ground. Is that correct?

3) I tried a piece of OSH Park board in the bracket. It is slightly too snug. A tiny bit of sanding should make it perfect. But, folks can specify whatever thickness they like, when they order their boards.
 

Offline t1d

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #61 on: May 13, 2016, 02:07:49 am »
Here is Rev2 of the board...
1) Changed the IR LED circuit to what I think is correct. Please verify.
2) Added an outline to build a box to house the components. I will likely build the box walls from thin paper board and pot the components, for strength and protection. Then, the box can be removed.
Thoughts? Suggestions?

I have printed the board outline. I hope to cut it out, tomorrow...
« Last Edit: May 13, 2016, 02:10:07 am by t1d »
 

Offline t1d

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #62 on: May 13, 2016, 08:47:20 am »
Well, if I ain't sleep'n, best to just play with the electronic stuff, right?

I cut out the cardboard PCB template. The locking arcs and the length were dead on. The corner offsets were too deep.

So, I have corrected the offsets and used the extra space to expand the box outline. See attached. I will go back through the print, cut, compare process and let you know how it goes...
 

Offline t1d

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #63 on: May 14, 2016, 12:09:04 am »
I managed to get the template printed, cut out and fit tested. It looks to be good enough to order a set of boards from OSH Park, for further testing.

It was difficult to determine from the paper template that the holes for the IR LED and Phototransistor are exactly in line with the ports on the DMM. This is about the only item that I am wondering about. So, having the prototype manufactured is necessary to make this final determination.

I picked a fancy, play-on-words name for the board, because that is what all the cool kids do... "LOCKSTEP" This term means to move in mirrored unison, as a marching band would do... The board locks onto the DMM and the DMM and computer move in unison... The name is printed on the bottom of the board...

Here is the OSH Park renderings. Notice that the price for 3 boards is just $4.10/shipped!
 

Offline serggio

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #64 on: May 14, 2016, 09:24:15 am »
Probably your IR emmiting/receiving LEDs placed slightly far away each other than in Fluke, then you might use my PCB that I developed for Fluke measuring devices with optoisolated UART connections.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2016, 07:55:08 pm by serggio »
 

Offline t1d

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #65 on: May 14, 2016, 12:59:36 pm »
Wow, Serggio, that's real good looking work. Thank you for offering to allow us to use it. I have already developed a DMM to Laptop PIC18F4550 converter platform. I use it for lots of different projects. I just need to plug all the components together and I am ready to go.

Tell me about your SMD components, particularly about the IR LED and Phototransistor. If I could find those two components, with their connector pads on the top surfaces, so I can invert them on my board, I would reconfigure the board, for people that want to use SMDs, too. I would like that type of IR interface, for myself. We need the light bandwidth to be 880nm, with

I am working on a Homemade Reflow Oven, with my brother. All of the hardware has been developed. All that is left is for my brother to finish the code work.
 

Offline serggio

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #66 on: May 14, 2016, 01:06:57 pm »
Hi t1d. I did a lot testing with different IR diodes. I will help you later. Sorry, i'm not front of PC. What information you want to know?
I using Vishay 5mm leds, photocurrents from 3 mm really weak and required preamplifier for good signal. 880 and 940 really doesn't matter ;)


?????????? ? ????? iPhone ????????? Tapatalk
 

Offline t1d

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #67 on: May 14, 2016, 01:09:42 pm »
Something odd happened when making this post... Here is the complete reply...

Wow, Serggio, that's real good looking work. Thank you for offering to allow us to use it. I have already developed a DMM to Laptop PIC18F4550 converter platform. I use it for lots of different projects. I just need to plug all the components together and I am ready to go.

Tell me about your SMD components, particularly about the IR LED and Phototransistor. If I could find those two components, with their connector pads on the top surfaces, so I can invert them on my board, I would design a second version of my board, for people that want to use SMDs, too. I would like that type of IR interface, for myself. We need the light bandwidth to be 880nm, with a low power requirement that can be driven directly off of the PIC 18F4550 pin.

I am working on a Homemade Reflow Oven, with my brother. All of the hardware has been developed. All that is left is for my brother to finish the code work. An SMD version of this board would make a great first-run project.
 

Offline t1d

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #68 on: May 14, 2016, 01:11:59 pm »
Hi t1d. I did a lot testing with different IR diodes. I will help you later. Sorry, i'm not front of PC. What information you want to know?
I using Vishay 5mm leds, photocurrents from 3 mm really weak and required preamplifier for good signal. 880 and 940 really doesn't matter ;)


?????????? ? ????? iPhone ????????? Tapatalk

Yes, I need to go, myself... I look forward to talking with you, later...
 

Offline serggio

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #69 on: May 14, 2016, 02:43:18 pm »
Yes, I need to go, myself... I look forward to talking with you, later...

Ok..
This is just part of my uncompleted AN that I preparing for future posting, but some information can help you...

Quote
....Now we will need to connect our UART lines from our FT232R (Tx and Rx – only two needed) to our measuring device MCU thru optoisolated infrared line. For that we’ll need emitting and receiving photodiodes working in infrared specter.
Usually this is 870-950 nm wavelength but most common infrared photodiodes able to receive signal in this diapason close to their peak wavelength characteristic. You can use 870, 880, 890, 900, 940, 950 nm emitting and receiving diodes. Only one thing need to remember… If you build interface for 115 200 bps connection speed, you need to be careful in choosing diodes. The main characteristic is are Rise/Fall time. We need depend “bit length” time – time in which emitting diode must be active or receiving photodiode must able to recognize signal. For 115 200 bps one bit have 6,8 uS length and out emitting diode must be able to switch On and Off as fast as possible to provide square form pulse for receivers. So device with 600-800 nS rise and fall time acceptable, 15 nS preferred. That rule also common for receiving photodiode and best devices have 5 - 2,5 nS rise/fall time duration. We absolutely not able to use phototransistors for high connection speed, while they provide much bigger photocurrent to compare with photodiodes, their turn on/off time is 2-3 uS and short bits will not be recognized by them. Photodiodes instead – our best friend here, but they provide very small current in chain and we’ll need additional parts of equipment to connect it to our FT232R in order to data received by photodiodes will be transformed to TTL or CMOS levels.


As for photodiode, I suggest you use leaded components instead SMD. For example BPV10(NF) http://www.vishay.com/photo-detectors/leaded-devices/
Because of emitting diode in meters driving with small current for power saving, you need to most sensitive photodiode to have enough amplitude (over 1V) on resistor connected in series with your diode. SMD photodiodes with 50-60 uA output photocurrent will be big in size. http://www.vishay.com/photo-detectors/list/product-81128/
In my board RX and TX LEDs this is just green and red emmiting LEDs for information purpose only. They can be excluded. D1 and Q1 - this is diodes for interface.
Hope this will help you.
 

Offline t1d

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #70 on: May 15, 2016, 12:17:24 am »
Wow, Serggio, that is really great information... I learned a thing, or two... Thanks! I look forward to checking out the links... I will be busy, tomorrow, too...
 

Offline Sairus

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #71 on: May 15, 2016, 06:22:27 pm »
Hi everyone.
I got brymen bm869 and right now try make my own usb cable (with blackjack and hookers).

I got one question:Are someone try to emulate genuine usb cable?

I try do it but brymen software not sending any command to my device (i use brymen VID and PID and software detect  "bu86x cable" but when i try to read it return error "no data received"). I tried with pic18f4455/18f46j50 in proteus no result,i tried in real hardware no result,i even write simple program when micro get any data from usb bus it light up the LED and it works when i send any data from hid terminal but not work with brymen software. :-//
 

Offline serggio

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #72 on: May 15, 2016, 06:34:59 pm »
 :-//
Are you sure that your adapter receiving all data without error? Can you check with oscilloscope what signals from photodiode you have?
If you want to make good working cable it's no possible to do without oscilloscope. Why you use PIC? Simple USB-UART IC should be enough.
 

Offline EEVblog

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« Last Edit: May 18, 2016, 05:03:38 am by EEVblog »
 

Offline jadew

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Re: Brymen IR connection protocol - Anyone sniffed it yet?
« Reply #74 on: May 18, 2016, 05:14:38 am »
Hey Dave,

Thanks for the video. It looks like the protocol described there is for their serial adapter. Given that the data you get from it is a map of the LCD panel, it's possible the protocol between the meter and the adapter is the same as the one we found on the BM867.

The only thing that will probably be different is that the BM235 won't have to wait for a trigger impulse, instead it will just output data with a time gap between the readings, since it doesn't have an RX diode.

PS: You named your video BM235 vs BM235.
 


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