Author Topic: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator  (Read 287061 times)

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Offline tzok

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2150 on: February 01, 2020, 07:16:17 pm »
Will there be any updated versions of this firmware? Is is worth to flash it to a working panel (v3.2)? Chineese firmware is a little annoying, especially with changing a waveform each time WAVE button is pressed. And there is also something wrong with the amplitude of built-in half wave rectifier (but I believe firmware doesn't have anything to it).
 

Offline masterx81

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2151 on: February 15, 2020, 12:03:30 pm »
Hi! One simple question. Why i see most people goes to ths3095 instead 3091? 3091 seem a bit better...
Thanks!
 

Offline bdivi

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2152 on: February 18, 2020, 01:51:40 pm »
If you take the trouble to disassemble the device completely and replace the buffers I suggest you go all the way with THS3491. These are the best currently available and you can order directly from TI.

 

Offline masterx81

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2153 on: February 18, 2020, 03:39:12 pm »
Aren't they a bit an overkill for a device like this?
 

Offline Jacon

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2154 on: February 18, 2020, 05:38:21 pm »
..... I suggest you go all the way with THS3491....
And what do you plan to do with 3491's PowerPad on this PCB, which isn't prepared for it ?   :palm:
 

Offline Noy

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2155 on: February 18, 2020, 07:09:22 pm »
You don't need the powerpad.
I also used them. But now i have some overshoots  with square Signal...
 

Offline masterx81

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2156 on: February 18, 2020, 08:27:16 pm »
One more reason to remain on classic 3091 😅
 

Offline bdivi

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2157 on: February 19, 2020, 10:52:35 am »
PowerPad thermal relieve is not required for the FY6600 output power. The original heat sink on top is more than enough.
The PCB is silkscreened bellow the ICs so no issues with shorting anything.

I have perfect square waves here - no overshoots whatsoever with sub 5ns rise and fall times.
 
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Online Miti

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2158 on: February 21, 2020, 01:27:08 am »
Look what I found in the dumpster at work today... among other goodies. GPS modules, brand new 7" LCDs 800x480, RF cables, pressure sensors, small screws, etc.

Fully isolated +/- 15V and 5V power modules. The first thought was... replacement for my FY6600 power supply. With a Mean Well 24V/15W (or even a decent 24V wall adapter from a thrift store) and two of these power modules, plus double LC filtering, I think I can get a pretty decent and quiet power supply with a small footprint. What do you think?
That big spark at power up was by design!
 
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Offline Johnny B Good

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2159 on: February 21, 2020, 11:39:53 pm »
Look what I found in the dumpster at work today... among other goodies. GPS modules, brand new 7" LCDs 800x480, RF cables, pressure sensors, small screws, etc.

Fully isolated +/- 15V and 5V power modules. The first thought was... replacement for my FY6600 power supply. With a Mean Well 24V/15W (or even a decent 24V wall adapter from a thrift store) and two of these power modules, plus double LC filtering, I think I can get a pretty decent and quiet power supply with a small footprint. What do you think?

 You lucky B'stard you! :)

 I don't usually bother downloading these "Show 'n' Tell" photos but since I wanted to invert the 2nd one to check out those GPS modules, I made an exception. They, and the inverted copy, are now in a folder in the Feeltech signal generators folder in the test equipment folder which I named "Miti's dumpster find (2020-02-21)" for future reference.

 I'd suggest using one of those 'R' cored mains transformers rather than replace one smpsu (the original bare board unit) with another (that Meanwell one you mentioned) to supply the required nominal 20vdc input to those dc-dc converter modules.

 There's no guarantee that even a a metal cased mains smpsu will do much better in preventing the high voltage switching spikes from escaping onto its low voltage output rails than the existing smpsu board. Using a conventional high quality mains transformer with capacitor smoothed full wave rectification of its low voltage secondary(ies) to feed those modules guarantees elimination of such a troublesome switching noise source from your proposed psu solution.

 The biggest downside with the classic conventional analogue mains psu arises from the waste heat of analogue voltage regulators (intelligent resistive droppers being a better description of your classic 7805, 7812 and 7912 voltage regulator).

 Using switching regulators in place of analogue regulators deals rather nicely with this waste heat issue although they may suffer some low level of switching ripple and noise on their output rails (but only extremely low levels of directly radiated or conducted switching noise in the case of competently designed switching regulator modules).

 At least you won't have to suffer the issues of high voltage switching transients being coupled onto the output rails via the inter-winding capacitance of a cheap commodity unshielded high voltage isolating/step down transformer so commonly used in your typical smpsu whether nicely encased in a metal "screening box"  like that Meanwell or just a tiny circuit board mounted in a lump of plastic directly plugged into a wall outlet.

 When you see claims of "Low noise and ripple" for the better quality smpsu, it's worth reminding yourself that that's just a relative term for the switching class of psu - even the 'low noise' types can still negate the benefit of all those low noise dc-dc converter modules you've lucked out on.

 Judging from the photos you posted, those modules appear to be good quality items, well worthy of such a project. I think it would be a big mistake to power them off yet another mains voltage smpsu whilst there's ample room to include a 15 to 25 VA R type mains transformer and a bridge rectifier and smoothing cap (along with a cheap 10MHz OCXO driving an NB3N502 programmed as a 5 times multiplier sat where the crappy smd XO used to be). A 15VA transformer is sufficient if you're not planning on upgrading to an OCXO but you might want the extra margin of an additional 5 to 10 VA to cater for any possible future OCXO upgrade.

 It looks like the left hand column is displaying the 5v modules and the middle column the +/-15v modules. It also looks like they're all blessed with heavy duty LDO post dc-dc converter voltage regulators intended to attenuate residual ripple and switching noise - they need to be special LDO chips with a much higher frequency psrr performance (100s of KHz versus the typical 10KHz max of an LM1117 LDO regulator) in order to achieve this hoped for reduction in output ripple and noise.

 Are the output rails really fully isolated from their input connections? Also, did you manage to track down any datasheet information on them? It looks like you've managed to capture a few of the "Unicorn Parts" I've been searching for on ebay this past year or so, you lucky B'stard.  ;)

 One final question (idle curiosity really) in regard of those GPS boards. Do you have any information of the actual gps modules themselves? I suspect they're most likely timing modules rather than cheap commodity navigation modules - u-blox maybe?

JBG
 

Online nctnico

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2160 on: February 22, 2020, 12:33:11 am »
Well... these kind of switching modules can push quite a bit of HF noise between the input and output. I wouldn't want to use these in a piece of test equipment without a very careful board design and filtering. These modules are nice to provide a lot of power to digital circuitry.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Online Miti

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2161 on: February 22, 2020, 01:36:35 am »
Datasheets and link attached.

https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-ultimate-gps

Edit: Those are not LDOs, they are Schottky diodes. The question is, what's a PIC doing there? Probably just ON/OFF and supervision?
« Last Edit: February 22, 2020, 02:07:14 am by Miti »
That big spark at power up was by design!
 
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Offline Johnny B Good

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2162 on: February 22, 2020, 04:05:55 am »
Datasheets and link attached.

https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-ultimate-gps

Edit: Those are not LDOs, they are Schottky diodes. The question is, what's a PIC doing there? Probably just ON/OFF and supervision?

 Thanks for the gps module link. So, it turns out to be not so useful a module as far as my GPSDO ambitions are concerned (my basic PLL GPSDO using a u-blox NEO-M8N is now completed and housed in a neat extruded aluminium case since my final reworking of the circuit just last night). I think the u-blox module is actually a better bet for this sort of  basic GPSDO project (based in part on Gyro's LEA-6T circuit he posted almost two years back here: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/my-u-blox-lea-6t-based-gpsdo-(very-scruffy-initial-breadboard-stage)/msg1493431/#msg1493431 ).

 I managed to track down a datasheet for the 5v module here: https://www.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/pdf/606479/DELTA/S36SE05003NRFB.html The specifications don't look too bad but I'd be inclined to test them for noise and ripple before committing myself to using them in a replacement PSU. Those +/-15 volt modules appear to be versions of the Murata modules as per the following pdf: https://power.murata.com/datasheet?/data/power/bei15.pdf. According to this page: https://power.murata.com/bei15-150-q12n-c.html they seem to have a 100mV ripple and noise rating (fairly typical for higher voltage output dc-dc converters).

 The important points of difference between the original smpsu board and a replacement mains voltage transformer based one using these modules is the elimination of the massive amounts of directly emitted RFI by the original mains smpsu and the amenability to additional low pass filtering of the noise and ripple of these modules (the opamps' own PSRR will largely take care of what noise and ripple remains on the voltage rails). The directly radiated switching hash from the original smpsu board which swamps everything can't be so conveniently disposed of by the on board opamps' PSRR.

 If you think you can easily solve the noise and ripple issue with cheap AM1117 LDO ICs, think again! For this trick to work, you'll need special LDOs designed to reject noise and ripple into the low MHz region - your standard off the shelf AM1117s just ain't going to cut the mustard for this job. :(

=============================================================================================
[EDIT 2020-02-22]
 I've just done an ebay search on those +/-15v modules and got this single hit https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1pcs-BEI15-150-Q12N-C-Murata-Murata-Power-Solutions-Isolated-DCDC/352744225236?hash=item522131b9d4:g:iGUAAOSwigxdR9Cb. By their deluded reckoning, you've got a tad more than 635 Australian dollars' worth in just those modules alone (around 325 quid's worth)  :wtf:

 The 5v modules are more reasonably priced at just $15.71 each by Octopart... Hmnn, I wonder if they do the 15v modules? Indeed they show a whole bunch of distributor prices at or around the $32 mark which makes X-On Electronic Services a bunch of (deluded - they seem to think they have a monopoly on these parts) piss taking wankers imho. More realistically, you seem to be in possession of around 270 dollars' (American) worth in dc-dc modules in total (assuming the photo represents your complete collection). Still a respectable return on your dumpster diving exploit.  ;)
=============================================================================================

JBG

« Last Edit: March 12, 2020, 04:41:35 pm by Johnny B Good »
 

Online Miti

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2163 on: February 23, 2020, 01:18:13 am »
[More realistically, you seem to be in possession of around 270 dollars' (American) worth in dc-dc modules in total (assuming the photo represents your complete collection). Still a respectable return on your dumpster diving exploit.  ;)
=============================================================================================

JBG

Add 2 GPS modules priced at $39.95 each, about 80 Li-Po batteries Zeus 2400 mAh, 4 brand new LCDs 800x480 LVDS, pressure sensors, mini vacuum pumps, and many more small things. Not too long ago I found some scrapped boards and I recovered 20+ genuine Ublox Neo M8T modules.
Now if only I could sell them...  :palm:
That big spark at power up was by design!
 

Online nctnico

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Re: FeelTech FY6600 60MHz 2-Ch VCO Function Arbitrary Waveform Signal Generator
« Reply #2164 on: February 23, 2020, 03:11:39 pm »
If you think you can easily solve the noise and ripple issue with cheap AM1117 LDO ICs, think again! For this trick to work, you'll need special LDOs designed to reject noise and ripple into the low MHz region - your standard off the shelf AM1117s just ain't going to cut the mustard for this job. :(
There is a very simple solution for that: use an RC filter in front of the LDO. The resistor will also help to dissipate some of the energy lost in the LDO.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline rhb

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Borked again!!!!!!

My FY6600 which came with V 3.0 which as is well known borks itself.  I received a replacement front panel with V 3.1 (long after V 3.2 was out and probably V 3.3).

Another member of the forum asked if he should buy an FY6600  for a project which  needs 2 Vpp into 50 ohms.  So I hooked my FY6600 up to a DSO, checked the output level, put a 24 dB attenuator on the input to my HP 8560A spectrum analyzer.  But I didn't get a signal.  Reconnected to scope, no signal.  Connected my Keysight 33622A to DSO.  DSO is fine.

I no longer get a sine drawn on the display.  But none of the other waveforms work either even though the display shows them.  I've done all the usual power cycle, reconnect cable stuff.  No joy!

At this point I have spent 100x more time fixing FY6600 issues (original 2 wire mains and V 3.0 FW) than I have using it.

So if anyone from F***Tech is reading this, do you think I should recommend  someone buy your product?  If so why?  I'd be more inclined to recommend it to a bitter enemy, but there is no one I hate that much except F***Tech.

Reg
 

Offline Johnny B Good

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If you think you can easily solve the noise and ripple issue with cheap AM1117 LDO ICs, think again! For this trick to work, you'll need special LDOs designed to reject noise and ripple into the low MHz region - your standard off the shelf AM1117s just ain't going to cut the mustard for this job. :(
There is a very simple solution for that: use an RC filter in front of the LDO. The resistor will also help to dissipate some of the energy lost in the LDO.

 Hi nctnico,

Apologies for the delay in responding but that recently completed basic DIY GPSDO I mentioned had been holding up a frequency injection locking add on project for my already very much modified FY6600 since May of last year and I had resumed this project to the exclusion of almost all else once I finally, and at long last, had a working GPSDO to play with.

 For anyone interested in locking their already upgraded to an OCXO FY6600 or 6800 generator to an external 10MHz reference, you can check out my Topic thread: Injection locking the 10Mhz OCXO to external reference (upgrading a FY6600) posting here: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/injection-locking-the-10mhz-ocxo-to-external-reference-(upgrading-a-fy6600)/msg2418711/#msg2418711

Returning to the matter in hand, using an RC filter is not a bad idea, especially when dealing with critical low current demand areas of a system that need to be kept isolated from the switching noise of a bulk power supply. A major plus point for the use of a resistor in place of an inductor is the avoidance of self resonance in a filter that's expected to deal with switching noise components that could extend to 100MHz or more.

 When I was deciding how to power my little GPSDO, I looked into the pros and cons of using LDOs with a buck converter powered from cheap commodity smpsu wallwarts in the 9 to 19 volts dc range and ultimately decided to forego the (in my case dubious[1]) benefit such an arrangement might bring.

 Since everything runs off a 5vdc supply (actually 5.16v), including the 13MHz OCXO, I'd initially considered using a 7805 (or modern day equivalent) to handle the voltage conversion from a 9 or 12 volt wallwart, but swiftly decided against this on the grounds that it would complicate the mechanical construction with the need to bolt its heatsink tab to the aluminium case as well as nearly double up the energy consumed with a 9v wallwart and more than double it in the case of a 12v supply.

 All of this energy input needs to be dissipated within the confines of a small 50 by 100 by 112mm extruded aluminium box that I'd prefer not  to compromise its RF screening properties any more than was absolutely necessary by riddling it with ventilation slots.

 Also, I was concerned about the indifferent voltage regulation of the AMS1117-5 used on the solderless breadboard psu board (YwRobot MB102) compared to the boost converter used in the Poundland 1200mA powerbanks with which I'd been testing the CQE 13MHz OCXO to determine whether it was a 12 or 5 volt unit I'd acquired for cheap (I couldn't track down a datasheet for this particular model but the search had lead me to a cheap supply of 12v 10MHz CQE OCXOs :D)

 I decided in the end to use the buck converter on its own to directly create the 5 volt supply and do away with any further complication. A bit of LC filtering reduced the 25mv p-p noise and ripple to less than 10mv with additional filtering for the OCXO and the GPS module making the need for any LDOs redundant in this case. Since the modestly insulated OCXO only consumes around 850mW[2] or so once warmed up, the total input power in the 7 to 20 volt range remains within 20mW or so of 1.8W (just under 3W mains voltage input to the 9 or 12 volt wallwarts I've used to power it up). Power supply noise and ripple doesn't appear to be an issue in this case so I'm quite pleased with the result.

[NOTES]

[1] I figured the extra heat penalty of allowing another 1.5 volts margin for a pair of LDOs (one for the OCXO and GPS module - 180mA warmed up, the other to serve the logic gates involved in converting the 13MHz to 10MHz and phase locking at 100KHz, also another 170 to 180mA) just wasn't worth the trouble, especially when there was every chance of poorer voltage regulation with load and temperature compared to that of the buck converter I'd chosen.

 I might have been able to reduce the load on the logic supply by some 30 to 50mA but the 74HC193 ICs just just don't seem to have the cojones of the old skool 74193 I was obliged to use to divide the 26MHz (clock doubled 13MHz OCXO output) to get the minimum frequency needed by the 2nd 3N502 clock multiplier I used to multiply the resulting 2MHz back up to the 10MHz sine wave reference I needed. Relying on additional LC filtering just seemed the better solution in this case.

[2] This 13MHz square wave output OCXO draws a warm up current, limited to 280mA which ultimately settles down to 190mA @4.82v after some seven minutes of warm up time which is reduced to a less agonising 5 minutes delay on a 5.16v supply. Wrapping it in a sponge rubber 'overcoat' knocks some 20 to 30mA off the at temperature operating demand.

 What had made me decide that it was a 5 volt version was the fact that for each volt increase on the Vcc pin up to a maximum test limit of 7.5v, results in an extra volt on the p-p output voltage, a trend that if continued to a 12v supply would result in (the never specified for any OCXO I'd ever seen datasheets for) of 11v p-p output.

 All the signs were that the oscillator was being powered directly off the incoming Vcc rather than via an LDO of any sort and although cmos can allow logic levels of 10 volts or more, this seemed a rather unlikely scenario so I decided not to push my luck any further than I already had and assume it to be a 5 volt unit (at 5 volts, it had proved stable enough without my taking any further risk in burning it out on a full 12 volt supply).

 However, the 12 volt 10MHz examples I have are, rather curiously, also limited to a maximum heater current of 280mA which of course drops to a lower (uninsulated, at temperature) current of circa 90mA which leads me to reconsider my decision to treat the 13MHz example as a 5 volt unit (especially since I'd been able to get the 12v units to output from a 5v supply, albeit with an even longer delay to start actually generating a recognisable sine wave output than the 13MHz unit had taken on a 4.82v supply). I may experiment further at a later date if I ever find any evidence that any OCXOs with 10v p-p cmos logic level outputs were even manufactured but, for now, I think I'll leave this sleeping dog to lay undisturbed lest it bite me in the backside for my trouble.

JBG
« Last Edit: March 14, 2020, 05:24:26 pm by Johnny B Good »
 

Offline playit

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hi i have dg41cn intel mobo, changed ram speed in bios ,then it never got up ,no matter what i did, my bios chip is W25Q16BVAIG 1023 ,can i erase and flash it to solve this ,can i do that with eeprom ch34 1a  programmer,thanks
 

Online engrguy42

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Apologies for being the new guy, waltzing in here and asking newbie questions, but...

I was wondering if some kind soul could give a brief summary of what are the big issues with this signal generator (and presumably the handful of re-branded equivalents) that have resulted in 87 pages of discussion over the last 3 years? It sounds like there are some major issues with firmware and/or grounding or something, requiring some to lash out at the vendor to get off their butts and fix it?

I ask because I have one of the re-branded versions and it seems to work fine. Surprisingly capable, IMO, for a $80 device, including some very surprising PC software that seems to do a nice job.

And while I'm the last guy to ever fall into the TL;DR camp, in this particular case I can't really justify reading 87 pages of stuff for an $80 device.  :D 

Thanks much to any kind soul who can assist.
- The best engineers know enough to realize they don't know nuthin'...
- Those who agree with you can do no wrong. Those who disagree can do no right.
- I'm always amazed at how many people "already knew that" after you explain it to them in detail...
 

Offline alexm58

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Apologies for being the new guy, waltzing in here and asking newbie questions, but...

I was wondering if some kind soul could give a brief summary of what are the big issues with this signal generator (and presumably the handful of re-branded equivalents) that have resulted in 87 pages of discussion over the last 3 years? It sounds like there are some major issues with firmware and/or grounding or something, requiring some to lash out at the vendor to get off their butts and fix it?

I ask because I have one of the re-branded versions and it seems to work fine. Surprisingly capable, IMO, for a $80 device, including some very surprising PC software that seems to do a nice job.

And while I'm the last guy to ever fall into the TL;DR camp, in this particular case I can't really justify reading 87 pages of stuff for an $80 device.  :D 

Thanks much to any kind soul who can assist.

I'm rather a new guy here, but I have followed this thread for a year or so, and read all the earlier posts.

TL;DR summary:

There were some major issues with the early versions, which were eventually (mostly) fixed by the manufacturer.

There are also a number of mods which can be made to significantly improve the performance of the unit for relatively little cost.

There are a few rants at the manufacturer, but mostly it's about fixing the problems of the early units, and improving performance.

HTH :)
 
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Online engrguy42

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Thanks much. I sure appreciate it.

I've got the Koolertron version (pretty much identical to the Feeltech and others), and I've been quite impressed at what you get for 80-90 bucks. Even the USB/PC software was VERY surprising, allowing you to build waveforms and stuff. It actually works.

- The best engineers know enough to realize they don't know nuthin'...
- Those who agree with you can do no wrong. Those who disagree can do no right.
- I'm always amazed at how many people "already knew that" after you explain it to them in detail...
 

Offline Johnny B Good

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Thanks much. I sure appreciate it.

I've got the Koolertron version (pretty much identical to the Feeltech and others), and I've been quite impressed at what you get for 80-90 bucks. Even the USB/PC software was VERY surprising, allowing you to build waveforms and stuff. It actually works.

 From what I've been able to glean off the interweb, this Koolertron branded Junctec GH-CJDS66 is a totally different beast to the Feeltech FY6600 that's been the subject of many many different modification projects in this topic thread. If this is still the case, as it appears to be (for all I know, it's just possible that Koolertron may have recently decided to abandon the Junctec version and sell the FY6600 as an alternative rebranded offering instead), then virtually everything that has been discussed in this thread simply won't apply.

 The most obvious distinction between the FY6600 (and its successors) and the Koolertron GH-CJDS66 is the use of an external 5V 2A rated wallwart to power it via the customary co-axial DC jack, eliminating not only the regulatory need to get the various safety certifications for an appliance powered by an internal Class II smpsu but also the expense (as cheap as the unit used in the Feeltech products was) of a 3 rail smpsu board.

 The other most striking difference between the Koolertron version and the Feeltech units is the Koolertron's use of a 10 digit frequency display versus the 14 digits of the more cramped Feeltech's display. If yours matches the descriptions above, then you'll most likely only be able to get general help and advice from this topic thread.

 JBG
 

Offline ThaZ

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I've version V3.3 as firmware in the FY6600-60Mhz  ::)
 

Offline darkspr1te

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Hi All,
 I'am asking if someone could give the tl;dr on the current status of firmware dump, I was asked by another forum user to look into this as I recently was able to dump a locked stm32f103r8 device and can confirm it works on on 105/107 devices too, How ever it's not perfect and requires certain things to hand tool wise to achieve.
I would be will to assist with these methods if we still have nothing on the unit.


darkspr1te

 

Offline DC1MC

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Well, as I am the "culprit" for asking ;), I will give you a status update:

1) There is no public unencrypted firmware dump of the original firmware.

2) There are a couple of encrypted upgrade firmwares, but because the upgrade function was not available on the early models (the ones with actually bad firmware bugs) the buyers had to either pocket the loss or insist, and, in some cases, being given a replacement front panel or a replacement programmed chip.

3) A number of community members, the shining star being fremen67, have devised alternative firmware to be used with some Arduino compatible boards (aka "Blue Pill").

4) A full firmware dump and the extraction of the encryption key to decode the updated firmwares will allow the people that still have older, non-upgradable units to update to the current version of the firmware.

5) Also, the possibility to save and restore the factory firmware will open the unit for experimentation and improvement.

6) I have such a unit and happily do any soldering and experiments that you require to extract the fw if possible an help time passind during the quarantine.

 Cheers,
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