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Fluke 179 keeps blowing fues

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Paul LGF:
Hi All,
Hope someone can help?
New here, but have read a lot of the different post on the 179 looking for answers. Very helpful information.
I bought this Fluke on ebay about 3 years ago. everything apart from current/amp draw testing worked. (didn't find this out until i went to find a parasitic draw on a car a few months after buying). Both fuses were blown, so replaced them. Went to test for a draw again, with no luck. Tested fuse again, and both had blown.
Have just put the smaller of the 2 fuses in, the milliamp one. Tested it with the Fluke itself and it reads 1.9 0hms. Acording to the manual this should be around <12 Ohms.
Is this right or do i have a short on the board
Hope to have the 10A fuse this week coming so will se what that reads when fitted
Any help very much appreciated

Gyro:
Welcome.

It's because, when you break the battery connection and re-make it (via the meter), many things draw surge currents and perform various high current consuming functions before the car shuts down to 'idle' / parasitic current.

To stand a chance of measuring parasitic current, you need to work out a way of implementing a shorting wire to bypass the meter until the car has fully shut down and then cut it to take the reading. Note that any intermittent connection will cause the fuse to blow. The car could take anything up to 20 minutes or more to fully shut down. Also beware of things like bonnet switches which could affect the process while the bonnet is open.

Paul LGF:
Thank you for the quick reply Gyro,

Should of said...I'm a mechanic/auto electrician, have been for over 30years now.  Also for a hobby i repair pinball machines. Here in France they call them Flippers.

Yes I am aware of the info but thank you again

Paul LGF:
Just thought that 1.9 Ohms was a bit to close to short for comfort

Fungus:
The only way to blow a fuse is to pass too many amps through it.

Those fuses are expensive and designed to save your life in high power situations.

People generally use current clamps for automotive work where there can be hundreds of amps and a high risk of blowing expensive fuses.


--- Quote from: Paul LGF on May 19, 2024, 06:44:36 pm ---Have just put the smaller of the 2 fuses in, the milliamp one. Tested it with the Fluke itself and it reads 1.9 0hms. Acording to the manual this should be around <12 Ohms.

--- End quote ---

Less is better.

Fuses should have as little resistance as possible to minimize the effect on the circuit.

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