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Frequency counters & 10MHz standards

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olsenn:

--- Quote ---I can't wait for all the screw ups and hallucinations I'll encounter bringing this project to completion; maybe the worst that could happen is that it just works ^^'
--- End quote ---

Why would it working be the worst thing, and why are you hallucinating... don't design on salvia...  it doesn't turn out well!

madshaman:

--- Quote from: olsenn on March 27, 2013, 03:24:25 pm ---
--- Quote ---I can't wait for all the screw ups and hallucinations I'll encounter bringing this project to completion; maybe the worst that could happen is that it just works ^^'
--- End quote ---

Why would it working be the worst thing, and why are you hallucinating... don't design on salvia...  it doesn't turn out well!

--- End quote ---

Lol, my lab is off limits to myself unless I'm well rested (well, having slept in at least the last 48 hours..) and sober :-)

If everything works, you learn less, it might even work for the wrong reason and you'll never know.

Hallucination is a term I picked up playing go, it's my way of describing that situation where everything looks good to you at a given moment in time, but things don't work, the reason being that what you think you're seeing isn't what's actually there, then later you slap your forehead saying "oh my god, why couldn't I see that!".  I find this happens *all* the time with every type of engineering.  To put it simply: you don't notice what you don't notice.  The same thing happens with math proofs, computer programs, wood working, practically everything.  Sure, as you gain more experience you make less mistakes, but you generally learn from your screw-ups caused by perceptual blindness.

Some people may feel they are very solid and accurate and sober and clear thinking, and maybe they are, I tend to find the world is *full* of constant misconceptions, and they can all be a fun source of learning.

Rufus:

--- Quote from: codeboy2k on March 27, 2013, 04:53:45 am ---Also, since you're building it, you can put in an attenuation pad on the 50 ohm input path, so you can switch in 5db, 10db, 20db, 40db attenuation, something like that, whatever you think you might need.
--- End quote ---

If your 50 ohm input could handle lets say a modest +20dbm to have any point a 40db attenuator in front of it would need a 1kW power rating.

kfitch42:
Speaking of DIY frequency counters:
http://dangerousprototypes.com/2013/03/27/1hz-to-10mhz-frequency-meter-using-attiny2313/

codeboy2k:

--- Quote from: Rufus on March 27, 2013, 05:16:43 pm ---
--- Quote from: codeboy2k on March 27, 2013, 04:53:45 am ---Also, since you're building it, you can put in an attenuation pad on the 50 ohm input path, so you can switch in 5db, 10db, 20db, 40db attenuation, something like that, whatever you think you might need.
--- End quote ---

If your 50 ohm input could handle lets say a modest +20dbm to have any point a 40db attenuator in front of it would need a 1kW power rating.

--- End quote ---

I worked with large transmitters in the past, from 5KW AM up to 250KW FM so large attenuations are always something I think about (and dummy loads that fill half a room!)

Probably not needed at the hobbyist level, yeah. 

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