Author Topic: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO  (Read 579116 times)

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Offline Rick Law

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Re: AW: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #100 on: November 30, 2013, 04:54:52 am »
You saved my day! I really was considering the 6022BE, but now I'm tending more to the older DSO2xxx series with smaller but onboard SRAM buffer and dedicated analog trigger...

uboot,

Look before you jump.

This is from memory, so I could be remembering the brand wrong.

From year old memory when I was looking, I found many of the other scope in the low end (100MHz and below, dual channel) including Rigol, Atten, etc do the same thing - smaller sample at higher speed and only full memory at slower speed.  I think Owon was the exception.

(Please do correct me if I have the brand/facts wrong)  Either way, do research before buy and don't assume.

Rick
 

Offline uboot

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #101 on: November 30, 2013, 10:46:22 am »
It's not sample depth that distracts me, it is triggering. I want reliable triggering with pre-trigger aquisition. Want to use the DSO for slow digital (CMOS) circuits. 1MHz clock max, but I won't regret having bandwidth / sampling speed for up to 20MHz clock.

Meanwhile, I discovered the new Owon VDS series - looks superior to Hantek 2xxx / better bang for the buck. 10M sample depth for the full speed range. The only thing I'm missing right now is in-depth reviews...
 

Offline RichardK

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #102 on: December 03, 2013, 11:03:37 pm »
Hello again everyone, got some more details to provide about the SDK...

A question was asked earlier about the ReadHardData and DrawWave functions, specifically the "nReadLen" and "nDisLen" for the ReadHardData function and the "nSrcDataLen" and "nDisDataLen" for the DrawWave functions.

When I was implementing GUI controls for Vertical and Horizontal I noticed that my application wasn't behaving exactly the same way as the stock 6022BE software, more specifically the Horizontal scaling was way off.

I had a hunch as to what was causing it, but no idea how to solve it... It turns out the "Read Length" and "Display Length" properties were the culprit as I had used the default values provided in the "SDK" and "Manual" PDF file.

The problem is, these values are highly dependent on what timebase you are in, and there is no documentation on what values to use on which timebases, and there is only one example in the SDK and PDF of it's use, but not enough to figure out what the rest should be.

The first problem I had to tackle was what "Read Length" values to use for each of the 39 different timebases in the original software, and an earlier post in this thread got me close, but no cigar.

I ended up having to write a redirection dll for the HTDisplayDll.dll which is simply a DLL to use between the original software and the real HTDisplayDll.dll file so I can snoop around and see what is being passed into the DLL function calls. This process was VERY tedious and time consuming but I got it working and here is what I came up with.

Below is a snippet of code, an enum I use in my software to describe the 39 different timebases used by the two DLLs. The index values for each enum is in the same order as the Timebase drop-down list in the original software and not surprisingly the same values used by the DLLs. Each enum is grouped by "Read Length" (see samples comments) and followed by a comment which shows the "Display Length", "Horizontal Scaling" and "Vertical Scaling" "Zoom" arguments used in the DrawWave function, and it turned out they were all 1:1 ratio but never the less good to know.

Code: [Select]
//Time Division
enum THantekTimeDivision
{
 //1016 samples
 HTTimeDiv48MS_1NS=0, //960, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv48MS_2NS=1, //960, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv48MS_5NS=2, //960, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv48MS_10NS=3, //960, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv48MS_20NS=4, //960, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv48MS_50NS=5, //960, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv48MS_100NS=6, //960, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv48MS_200NS=7, //960, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv48MS_500NS=8, //960, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv48MS_1US=9, //960, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv48MS_2US=10, //960, 1, 1

 //130048 samples
 HTTimeDiv16MS_5US=11, //800, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv8MS_10US=12, //800, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv4MS_20US=13, //800. 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv1MS_50US=14, //500, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv1MS_100US=15, //1000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv1MS_200US=16, //2000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv1MS_500US=17, //5000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv1MS_1MS=18, //10000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv1MS_2MS=19, //20000, 1, 1

 //523264 samples
 HTTimeDiv1MS_5MS=20, //50000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv1MS_10MS=21, //100000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv1MS_20MS=22, //200000, 1, 1

 //1047552 samples
 HTTimeDiv1MS_50MS=23, //500000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv1MS_100MS=24, //1000000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv500K_200MS=25,//1000000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv200K_500MS=26,//1000000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv100K_1S=27, //1000000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv100K_2S=28, //2000000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv100K_5S=29, //5000000, 1, 1
 HTTimeDiv100K_10S=30, //10000000,1,1
 HTTimeDiv100K_20S=31, //20000000,1,1
 HTTimeDiv100K_50S=32, //50000000,1,1
 HTTimeDiv100K_100S=33, //100000000,1,1
 HTTimeDiv100K_200S=34, //200000000,1,1
 HTTimeDiv100K_500S=35, //500000000,1,1
 HTTimeDiv100K_1000S=36,//1000000000,1,1
 HTTimeDiv100K_2000S=37,//2000000000,1,1
 HTTimeDiv100K_5000S=38,//-1,1,1
};

As you can see, to scale the waveforms properly the "Display Length" is not the same as the "Read Length" and in some cases it's larger than the former.

Needless to say, my application now behaves exactly like the stock software and later on I'll post my DLL Hooking code that I used to reverse engineer the timebase argument convention.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2013, 11:16:57 pm by RichardK »
 

Offline RichardK

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #103 on: December 03, 2013, 11:55:20 pm »
Here is the DLL Hooking code I wrote to obtain the proper "Read Length" and "Display Length" values... It is a CodeGear RAD Studio C++ Builder project but most of the relevant code is written in standard C++ using windows API calls and should compile with few changes in any windows compiler.

This is the code I used to print the relevant information in the scope (see screenshot)... As you can see we are hijacking the original function to display some information, then handing control back to the original DLL function. To the original software this is completely transparent, it cannot tell that our DLL sits between it and the real DLL.

Code: [Select]
extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) void WINAPI HTDrawWaveInYT(HDC hDC, RECT Rect,
COLORREF clrRGB, USHORT nDisType, short* pSrcData, ULONG nSrcDataLen,
ULONG nDisDataLen, ULONG nCenterData, USHORT nDisLeverPos, double dbHorizontal,
double dbVertical, USHORT nYTFormat, ULONG nScanLen)
{
//Convert SrcDataLen, DisDataLen, dbHorizontal and dbVertical to a string
std::string CallData = AnsiString("DataLen: "+IntToStr((int)nSrcDataLen)+
" - DisLen: "+IntToStr((int)nDisDataLen)+
" - dbHorizontal: "+FloatToStr(dbHorizontal)+
" - dbVertical: "+FloatToStr(dbVertical)).c_str();

//Set the text color to the waveform color (otherwise our text will be black on black!)
SetTextColor(hDC, clrRGB);

//Display the text inside the waveform area
TextOut(hDC, Rect.left, Rect.top, CallData.c_str(), CallData.length());

//Call the original DLL function
lib_HTDrawWaveInYT(hDC, Rect, clrRGB, nDisType, pSrcData, nSrcDataLen, nDisDataLen,
nCenterData, nDisLeverPos, dbHorizontal, dbVertical, nYTFormat, nScanLen);
}

« Last Edit: December 04, 2013, 05:47:28 am by RichardK »
 

Offline Rick Law

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #104 on: December 04, 2013, 05:22:20 am »
Good going, Mark and Richard!

The information you two unearth is going to be vary valuable for anyone who wants to dig into the code.  Very informative and interesting.

Thanks, guys - I will continue to learn from you two.

Rick

 

Offline Mark_O

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #105 on: December 04, 2013, 12:26:51 pm »
The problem is, these values are highly dependent on what timebase you are in, and there is no documentation on what values to use on which timebases, and there is only one example in the SDK and PDF of it's use, but not enough to figure out what the rest should be.

The first problem I had to tackle was what "Read Length" values to use for each of the 39 different timebases in the original software, and an earlier post in this thread got me close, but no cigar.

I ended up having to write a redirection dll for the HTDisplayDll.dll...

Thanks, Richard, for taking the time to dig out this information.  Personally, I think it's pretty sad that Hantek doesn't simply publish it, rather than making customers jump through hoops.  It's not as if they don't know those numbers, and that without them, the data can't be displayed properly.

Quote
As you can see, to scale the waveforms properly the "Display Length" is not the same as the "Read Length" and in some cases it's larger than the former.

I probably need to come back when I have a bit more time to read this, but I still don't understand how a parameter in an acquisition function affects the raw captured data.  Unless the ReadData is NOT returning the actual sample data captured, but some expansion/interpolation thereof.  (Beyond the short 1016 captures you already explained previously.)
 

Offline RichardK

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #106 on: December 04, 2013, 06:07:47 pm »
I probably need to come back when I have a bit more time to read this, but I still don't understand how a parameter in an acquisition function affects the raw captured data.  Unless the ReadData is NOT returning the actual sample data captured, but some expansion/interpolation thereof.  (Beyond the short 1016 captures you already explained previously.)

I hooked the GetHardData and fed the "nReadLen" and "nDisLen" to a file and played around with the time bases and this is what I got:

Code: [Select]
nReadLen: 130048 - nDisLen: 800
nReadLen: 130048 - nDisLen: 500
nReadLen: 1016 - nDisLen: 960
nReadLen: 130048 - nDisLen: 800
nReadLen: 130048 - nDisLen: 1000
nReadLen: 523264 - nDisLen: 50000
nReadLen: 1047552 - nDisLen: 2000000000
nReadLen: 1047552 - nDisLen: -1

So it's essentially the same as the DrawWave, but as to why they need the display length in there, no idea... But I'm going to find out when I modify what they are sending the ReadHardData function  >:D

Edit: I modified the hook to change the nDisLen to 1000 then to 0 and I noticed no changes in application behavior, so it's entirely possible the parameter is redundant/unused.

Code: [Select]
extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) short WINAPI dsoReadHardData(WORD DeviceIndex,
short* pCH1Data, short* pCH2Data, ULONG nReadLen, short* pCalLevel, int nCH1VoltDIV,
int nCH2VoltDIV, short nTrigSweep, short nTrigSrc, short nTrigLevel, short nSlope,
int nTimeDIV, short nHTrigPos, ULONG nDisLen, ULONG* nTrigPoint, short nInsertMode)
{
/*
//Stringify needed arguments
std::string Info = AnsiString("nReadLen: "+IntToStr((int)nReadLen)+" - nDisLen: "+IntToStr((int)nDisLen)).c_str();

//
std::ofstream OutFile("C:\\Program Files\\Hantek6022BE\\ReadHardData.txt", fstream::app);
OutFile << Info << std::endl;
OutFile.close();
*/

//Change Display Length >:)
nDisLen = 0;

return lib_dsoReadHardData(DeviceIndex, pCH1Data, pCH2Data, nReadLen, pCalLevel,
nCH1VoltDIV, nCH2VoltDIV, nTrigSweep, nTrigSrc, nTrigLevel, nSlope, nTimeDIV,
nHTrigPos, nDisLen, nTrigPoint, nInsertMode);
}
« Last Edit: December 04, 2013, 06:18:16 pm by RichardK »
 

Offline RichardK

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #107 on: December 05, 2013, 06:48:47 am »
Yet again, some more undocumented information... Not surprisingly the Hantek "SDK" or "Manual" doesn't mention this, but in order for triggering to work and display a stable waveform, you have to use the Trigger Point Index value (set by the ReadHardData function) inside the DrawWave function, specifically the nCenterData argument.

Now, the provided example code in the "SDK" shows this nCenterData argument being supplied with simply half of the ReadLength (of the raw data buffer).

However if you use this method you will find your waveforms bouncing all over the place and your Trigger Level having no effect what so ever...

Here is what you have to do... Supply the nCenterData argument with the value of the Trigger Point Index (index relative to raw data where triggered) + Raw Read Length divided by 2 (half of the entire raw data).

Again I had to use my Hooking code to find out what the hell was going on with the DrawWave function and I noticed that in the original software the nCenterData value wasn't exactly half of the RawDataLength and furthermore it was changing rapidly, which clued me to the possibility they were using the Trigger Point Index to offset it somehow.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2013, 05:48:26 pm by RichardK »
 

Offline rpcope1

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #108 on: December 09, 2013, 07:28:22 am »
I have reverse engineered the Front End if anyone is interested:

The A7 device is just a fast switching rectifier, it breaks down at 100V and it's being used to clamp the signal to -5V and +5V.

Also take note that the instead of your usual 1M ohm resistor and trimmer capacitor in parallel connected from input signal to ground we have the input signal going through a 909K resistor with the trimmer capacitor in parallel with it, then shunted to ground through a 100K resistor and an SMD capacitor in parallel. To the input, it looks like a 1M resistor to ground, but the signal is being tapped between 909K and 100K, then going to the first Op Amp. I'm not sure a 5V input signal in 1x mode is going to give a 5V signal at the node between the 909K and 100K, but more like 500mv. This would mean the probe in 1x mode is going to be safe all the way up to 50V and 500V in 10x.

Also, the outside of my unit shows a label between the BNC connecors that says "35vpk max" which I am not sure if they mean for 1x or 10x?

  Richard,

I would be very interested in what you've done with the front end. I wrapped the SDK into Python via ctypes, thinking I would use this scope for data acquisition and possibly doing some spectrum analysis. To you and anyone else that might be interested, I uploaded my Python wrapper to https://github.com/rpcope1/Hantek6022API . I hope someone can get something useful out of it.

Also to you and everyone else, I saw someone mentioned changing or fixing the DC-DC converter. I can see where the Mornsun DC-DC convert is soldered in (and I agree, it's a terrible choice for this application). I think the first thing I'm going to attempt to do is solder some big electrolytic caps onto between both the V+ and V- and the 0V reference coming out of the converter. Does this sound reasonable thing to do to reduce noise on the traces? I'm also open to changing the DC-DC converter here if anyone has some suggestions as to how to do, and reporting how it worked. I think this will make an interesting experiment.

  Also, I'm interested in any other experimentation you all are thinking about (including possibly hacking the firmware?).
 

Offline RichardK

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #109 on: December 09, 2013, 04:40:41 pm »
Quote
I would be very interested in what you've done with the front end

I added 100uF 16V electrolytics in parallel with the large SMD capacitors after the +5V USB branch and after the +3.3V Regulator.

I also stacked (in a very bodgy fashion) SMD capacitors on top of ALL the bypassing capacitors for the USB Micro and ADC.

Then I stacked SMD Capacitors on the larger of the three SMDs before the DC-DC (C103 & C105) and I stacked the SMD Capacitors on the other side, specifically the large ones going between +5 and -5 and the ones going from +5 to GND and -5 to GND, both before and after the Inductors.

Then I made a very rudimentary screening can out of copper foil shielding over clear PETE plastic, to which I measured and scored the PETE and folded it into a can shape, then soldered tinned copper wire to various places around the side, aligned with where the solder holes for the can were positioned. I made two of these so each channel had it's own can.

I then used copper foil tape to shield the holes on both aluminum end caps which were only covered with the sticky label on the other side, the largest of the holes is where the Logic Analyzer header would mount.

I used copper foil tape around the DC-DC and grounded it with a braided copper strap (Solder wick). Also, my unit did not come with a heatsink on the ADC (though my board revision is 1.00.2, not 1.00.1) so I added a flat TO220 heatsink mounted with Arctic Silver thermal adhesive and ground strapped with copper braid again.

Figures though, stupid me forgot to aquire some waveforms pre-modification to compare, but from memory I was getting 10-15mv noise and post modification it's down to 3-5mv.

I'll take pictures of the interior later and post them here, as well as some screenshots of the noise floor.

Quote
I think the first thing I'm going to attempt to do is solder some big electrolytic caps onto between both the V+ and V- and the 0V reference coming out of the converter. Does this sound reasonable thing to do to reduce noise on the traces? I'm also open to changing the DC-DC converter here if anyone has some suggestions as to how to do, and reporting how it worked. I think this will make an interesting experiment.

The DC-DC datasheet specifies a maximum capacitive load of 100uF so be careful what you add there, and I also plan on populating the Buck & Charge Pump section to see what happens.

Edit: Here is a high-res PNG legend of my changes using Aurora's high res PCB image (hope he doesn't mind): http://img198.imageshack.us/img198/3733/7ljo.png
« Last Edit: December 09, 2013, 07:29:20 pm by RichardK »
 

Offline RichardK

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #110 on: December 09, 2013, 07:01:22 pm »
Here are the inside pictures, using a cell phone camera at the moment so they are not very bright or crisp...

As you can see, I have already started populating the alternative DC-DC section with SMD Capacitors, and I noticed some Hantek equipment has the Crystal can grounded so I did that as well, probably doesn't change much but it didn't hurt it either.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2013, 07:11:26 pm by RichardK »
 

Offline RichardK

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #111 on: December 09, 2013, 07:02:20 pm »
And the front and back panels with copper foil over the gaping holes, held on with Kapton tape.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2013, 07:12:13 pm by RichardK »
 

Offline Rick Law

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #112 on: December 10, 2013, 06:12:14 am »
Awsome!  Richard.
 

Offline rexnanet

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #113 on: December 12, 2013, 03:23:39 pm »
Great "hack" :D

I've just ordered one and as soon as I get it I'm going to do the same!

Next step would be shorting some points to GND to see what's the main point of noise collection, going from the ADC input to the BNC connector. Despite this, 3-5mV seems more acceptable :)

Yep, photos from the noise floor from before the mod would be nice for comparison. I'll try to post some when I get mine.

I was plannig to build one myself... but time is not the most available product around here, so this one seemed a nice "low-cost starter kit" :)

P.S. Hello World! LOL
 

Offline Mark_O

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #114 on: December 12, 2013, 04:03:03 pm »
...forgot to aquire some waveforms pre-modification to compare, but from memory I was getting 10-15mv noise and post modification it's down to 3-5mv.

We're more interested in the after, than the before, but 10-15 mVpp noise is about average from all the reports here, and elsewhere.  Worst case I've seen reported was 20 mV, and that was probably an outlier.  And as bad as that sounds, it's not really unusual.  I.e., the max sensitivity of the 6022BE is 20mV/div, so you were seeing ~1/2-3/4 div of noise.  That's similar to many more expensive scopes.  Though they have much higher sensitivities, the relative noise levels are about the same.

While Vpp noise is good to know, also helpful could be using the FFT function, to get the spectral distribution of the noise components.

Lastly, you enumerated 6 tweaks you made to the board, though I thought I counted more like 8.  But in any event, it would be helpful to know the relative contribution of each, to maximize 'bang for the buck'.  Not necessarily to minimize cost, but perhaps time.  I suspect, and it's highly probably, that some tweaks will have very minimal influence.  And omitting them really wouldn't matter. 

Of course, to conduct such a study would require stopping to evaluate after each mod was installed.  I realize that's asking a bit much.  But just a thought for those following in your footsteps, if they'd like to make their own contributions.
 

Offline rpcope1

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #115 on: December 13, 2013, 03:13:22 am »
Here are the inside pictures, using a cell phone camera at the moment so they are not very bright or crisp...

As you can see, I have already started populating the alternative DC-DC section with SMD Capacitors, and I noticed some Hantek equipment has the Crystal can grounded so I did that as well, probably doesn't change much but it didn't hurt it either.

Wow! This looks pretty good. I'm going to try to do the same for mine. Thanks so much for posting your pictures and keeping us updated!  :)
 

Offline RichardK

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #116 on: December 13, 2013, 07:24:08 pm »
No problem guys, my pleasure.

Lastly, you enumerated 6 tweaks you made to the board, though I thought I counted more like 8.  But in any event, it would be helpful to know the relative contribution of each, to maximize 'bang for the buck'.  Not necessarily to minimize cost, but perhaps time.  I suspect, and it's highly probably, that some tweaks will have very minimal influence.  And omitting them really wouldn't matter. 

Of course, to conduct such a study would require stopping to evaluate after each mod was installed.  I realize that's asking a bit much.  But just a thought for those following in your footsteps, if they'd like to make their own contributions.

I don't want to hog all the fun :)
 

Offline sneasle

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #117 on: December 19, 2013, 10:52:21 pm »
Just ordered myself one of these to give myself a little extra capability until I move again next year and hopefully have enough room to add a true DSO.

That said, I appreciate the efforts you guys are putting into this thing, I look forward to implementing some of these changes on mine.


That said, I was wondering if anyone knew if any of the other software tools support this model yet?
 

Offline RichardK

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #118 on: December 20, 2013, 02:12:04 am »
That said, I was wondering if anyone knew if any of the other software tools support this model yet?

I am not aware of any, other than Open Hantek, which currently doesn't support the 6022BE however someone in their forums is attempting to add support for it.

I am in the process of making my own Open Source version using the Hantek "SDK", and my goal is to at least match the functionality of the original software which should be enough for anyone to start from in adding to it. It's being written in C++ using Code Gear's RAD Studio (C++ Builder, formally by Borland).

It's pretty far off from being done, or even usable but here is a screenshot of my progress thus far (see attachment):
« Last Edit: December 20, 2013, 02:13:52 am by RichardK »
 

Offline rpcope1

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #119 on: December 23, 2013, 02:13:05 am »
  Hey guys,

Just to build on RichardK's work, I got around modifying the hardware on my 6022BE this weekend. I added the 100 uF capacitors to the +5V USB rail and the +3.3V rail, and made an aluminum foil shield for the DC-DC converter, which was soldered to ground. I also added film 1 uF capacitors between +V0 and 0V and between -V0 and 0V. These capacitors hopefully don't push the DC-DC converter too far as capacitive load goes. It looks like I'm down to some sporadic 2-3 mV noise, which given how much I've got in this, isn't bad. RichardK, I really like your new GUI; I think C++ is a much better choice for this than Python, if nothing else for the speed. Thanks again for your hard work. :)

Edit: Spelling error.
No problem guys, my pleasure.

Lastly, you enumerated 6 tweaks you made to the board, though I thought I counted more like 8.  But in any event, it would be helpful to know the relative contribution of each, to maximize 'bang for the buck'.  Not necessarily to minimize cost, but perhaps time.  I suspect, and it's highly probably, that some tweaks will have very minimal influence.  And omitting them really wouldn't matter. 

Of course, to conduct such a study would require stopping to evaluate after each mod was installed.  I realize that's asking a bit much.  But just a thought for those following in your footsteps, if they'd like to make their own contributions.

I don't want to hog all the fun :)
« Last Edit: December 23, 2013, 02:15:24 am by rpcope1 »
 

Offline rpcope1

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #120 on: December 23, 2013, 02:43:41 am »
I attached a background noise power spectrum for my now modified 6022BE, which I think is pretty revealing. This scope is attached to my old laptop. When I remove the charger cable, the noise seems to grow slightly. I guess this thing doesn't have sufficient enough shielding or whatever else to reject all of the regular EMI at this level. Still I get flickers of noise at 3.8 mV; I suspect this only a single bit on the DAC, and I'm not sure we're going to do much better for noise reduction on this device. Still I'd be open to ideas to reducing it. :D

Here are the inside pictures, using a cell phone camera at the moment so they are not very bright or crisp...

As you can see, I have already started populating the alternative DC-DC section with SMD Capacitors, and I noticed some Hantek equipment has the Crystal can grounded so I did that as well, probably doesn't change much but it didn't hurt it either.

Wow! This looks pretty good. I'm going to try to do the same for mine. Thanks so much for posting your pictures and keeping us updated!  :)

Edit: Clarified what the power spectrum was referring to.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2013, 08:32:34 pm by rpcope1 »
 

Offline RichardK

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #121 on: December 30, 2013, 06:27:46 am »
Little bit more progress on the software side (see attachment)...

I have implemented two different cursor modes, one exactly like the cursor mode in the original software (Cross, Horizontal, Vertical) and one I call Interactive, where two cursors labeled 1 & 2 in little circles are drawn with the waveform and you can interact with them by dragging them across the waveform, and they will follow the wave's y axis.

By the way, ignore the ugly toolbar button glyphs, those will not be in the final version as I am going to make my own graphics for the toolbar but those are placeholders until I am done.

Anyway, lots more work to do on it, but thought I'd share my progress thus far for those who are interested, thanks :)
« Last Edit: December 30, 2013, 06:31:29 am by RichardK »
 

Offline rpcope1

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #122 on: December 31, 2013, 11:44:43 pm »
Little bit more progress on the software side (see attachment)...

I have implemented two different cursor modes, one exactly like the cursor mode in the original software (Cross, Horizontal, Vertical) and one I call Interactive, where two cursors labeled 1 & 2 in little circles are drawn with the waveform and you can interact with them by dragging them across the waveform, and they will follow the wave's y axis.

By the way, ignore the ugly toolbar button glyphs, those will not be in the final version as I am going to make my own graphics for the toolbar but those are placeholders until I am done.

Anyway, lots more work to do on it, but thought I'd share my progress thus far for those who are interested, thanks :)

Richard, this looks awesome. Thanks for sharing! :)
 

Offline Fraser

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #123 on: January 01, 2014, 12:28:39 pm »
Better software would be a Godsend to this hardware . Thank you your efforts to provide such  :-+
 

Offline Rick Law

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Re: Hantek 6022BE 20MHz USB DSO
« Reply #124 on: January 02, 2014, 08:48:02 pm »
Little bit more progress on the software side (see attachment)...

I have implemented two different cursor modes, one exactly like the cursor mode in the original software (Cross, Horizontal, Vertical) and one I call Interactive, where two cursors labeled 1 & 2 in little circles are drawn with the waveform and you can interact with them by dragging them across the waveform, and they will follow the wave's y axis.

By the way, ignore the ugly toolbar button glyphs, those will not be in the final version as I am going to make my own graphics for the toolbar but those are placeholders until I am done.

Anyway, lots more work to do on it, but thought I'd share my progress thus far for those who are interested, thanks :)

Richard, do you have executable/binary you can share?  I don't have a C++ compiler newer than Microsoft VC5.

Thanks
 


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