Author Topic: Just scored my first Fluke. Need a manual...thanks  (Read 2114 times)

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Offline gooseEL34

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Just scored my first Fluke. Need a manual...thanks
« on: March 08, 2013, 11:13:56 pm »
Hey all.
Just scored a Fluke 189 (series I) for $84 with the good probes, at a local pawn shop.  Works like a dream.
Searched the Fluke site for a manual and it seems I cannot find it.

Can someone point me to a link for the Fluke 189 (Not the series II) meter?

Thanks guys
Tim
 

alm

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Re: Just scored my first Fluke. Need a manual...thanks
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2013, 11:18:24 pm »
Searching for 189 on Fluke Manuals Search gives me the correct user manual as first hit.
 

Offline gooseEL34

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Re: Just scored my first Fluke. Need a manual...thanks
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2013, 11:20:38 pm »
Huh?  When I type 189 in the search dialog box I get a "please enter a valid search term" error box.
 

Offline gooseEL34

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Re: Just scored my first Fluke. Need a manual...thanks
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2013, 11:22:07 pm »
Ooops... I hit 189 then hit RETURN key.  Apparently hitting the arrow button got me there.  Thanks!!!
 

Offline retiredcaps

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Re: Just scored my first Fluke. Need a manual...thanks
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2013, 11:33:55 pm »
Just scored a Fluke 189 (series I) for $84 with the good probes, at a local pawn shop.  Works like a dream.
That is a great price.  The 189 usually go for about $200 on ebay.  If I found one for $84 with working fuses and probes, I would definitely buy one.

Check the battery compartment to make sure there isn't any corrosion or leakage like my used ebay Fluke 187.

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/fluke-187-corroded-battery-terminals-how-to-clean/

I use eneloops batteries.
 

Offline gooseEL34

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Re: Just scored my first Fluke. Need a manual...thanks
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2013, 11:56:51 pm »
Yeah.  I suspect it was priced at $99.99 because it is a pawn shop and the display was not working when it was turned on.  I asked them if they had 4 AA batteries, popped them in and it roared to life.  I asked if they would take $85 out the door, and I believe she charged me $75 and sales tax (0.0950% here in Tennessee).
I only work on guitar amps, so truthfully, my 0.5% accuracy Fieldpiece LT16A (Chinese) was probably ok, but I couldn't pass on a Fluke at 1/2 price.  Probably ebay my Greenlee and Fieldpiece and be out of pocket $10-20 at the end of the day.

Is there a way to zero out the leads on a resistance test on this meter?  Could not find it in the manual.  Not really important, I suppose, as the leads read about 0.07 ohm (which is WAY smaller than the error in the 20% carbon comp resistors in these old 1960s guitar amps I fool with), but thought I would ask.

Tim
 

Offline retiredcaps

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Re: Just scored my first Fluke. Need a manual...thanks
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2013, 12:31:21 am »
Is there a way to zero out the leads on a resistance test on this meter?
Yes, hit the rel button.

BTW the 189 also measures db.  As I mentioned in your other thread, it might be useful for you?
 

Offline gooseEL34

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Re: Just scored my first Fluke. Need a manual...thanks
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2013, 01:13:30 am »
It measures dB, (which I assume is decibels?).   I would need a special probe for that I suppose, yes?
I have only every heard of dB in sound level meters (usually hand held meters that cops use to harass my clients who have exhaust pipes too loud).   

Also...there is an AC and DC measurement.  that seems cool to me.  I suppose I can connect it across my amps dummy load and see if any DC is getting onto the output (where generally it equates to noise/hum).

I am relatively self-taught.  I probably didn't need the Fluke, as mostly, I am using a meter to make sure that the DC voltages on the tube componets (plate, cathode, grid) are within the expected range.  I also use it to measure current draw of a tube at idle in a class AB push pull amplifier (like most common fixed bias guitar amps happen to be).

I recently bought a college text to start learning some basic EE stuff that I don't already know (I "get" ohm's law for example).

I hope to eventually design guitar effect pedals (diode clipping distortion pedals, analog delays, etc...)
Just a hobby for me now, as I am a defense attorney with the public defender as a day job...

I really appreciate the EEvblog forums as people are really willing to help.  For example, with help from this list, I got the courage to pull apart my first solid state guitar amp, and was able to confirm that the +15 and -15 rails were present and was able to make a trim pot adjustment that got the onboard compressor working.  That freakin' amazes me.....

If I didn't have 100k USD of student loans, I would DEFINITELY be designing, building and repairing guitar amps full time (and maybe getting a B.A. in EE).

Cheers,
Tim
« Last Edit: March 09, 2013, 01:21:34 am by gooseEL34 »
 


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