Author Topic: If Brymen BM869s is cheaper and as good, why people would still buy Fluke?  (Read 127703 times)

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Offline hgg

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Quote
But the advantage is, the 9V clip is easily replaced. The compartment is separate, so nothing can leak on the PCB. Snip the wires and solder in a new one.

That's a good point.
 

Online Lightages

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BM867 was indeed my first choice, but I've heard that they use lesser quality fuses.
I don't really care about the VDF.

The Brymen website has not been updated to reflect the new meter standards. The BM867S has the same 1kV fuses as the BM869S.
 

Online Lightages

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As a side note, does anybody know if the VFD function of the BM869S
is similar with the LPF hidden mode of the UT61E ?

The VFD in the Brymen meters is basically a LPF function, yes.
 

Offline hgg

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>>The BM867S has the same 1kV fuses as the BM869S.

Nice to know. 
Now the price of the BM867 becomes more attractive...

>>The VFD in the Brymen meters is basically a LPF function, yes.
Not bad for a $45 meter then.  I am planning to do that mod together with some others.

I was searching for the VFD function and in the Brymen BM869 manual indeed says that:

"High noise-rejection frequency measurement algorithm and Low-pass filter circuit
are permanently bundled with all the voltage and frequency function-ranges within
this rotary-switch position."




 

Offline pxl

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Now the price of the BM867 becomes more attractive...

Yes, but it misses the temp. measurement and the accuracy is bit worse. Probably they sell the out of specs 869s as 867s. Nothing wrong with that, they specified and sell cheaper. It is perfectly ok, just need to be aware of that.

EDIT: but there is a high chance that the specs won't be worse, because they produce as many 867 as needed, not as many were out of specs. Probably these meters are different (I don't really know), but they just use similar parts and preselected before producing. The good ones go to the 869 the not that good ones to the 867.

This is just my theory, of course.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2016, 05:50:28 pm by pxl »
 

Offline nanofrog

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Probably they sell the out of specs 869s as 867s.
FWIW, the 867 uses a laser cut precision resistor network, while the 869 adds a shielded area with an adjustable pot/s. The older BM85x series was the same way, and was the basis for the newer BM86x series.

BM867 photos.
BM869 photos (8 total; can be downloaded as a .zip)
 

Offline pxl

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Probably they sell the out of specs 869s as 867s.
FWIW, the 867 uses a laser cut precision resistor network, while the 869 adds a shielded area with an adjustable pot/s. The older BM85x series was the same way, and was the basis for the newer BM86x series.

BM867 photos.
BM869 photos (8 total; can be downloaded as a .zip)

Good to know, thanks! (Anyway, it was a nice theory from me :D)
 

Offline Valden

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Hello all.

I'm new to posting here, after lurking for a while. I'm based in Australia and am chiming in with what I've found (in May 2017) on prices for the Brymen BM869S and the Fluke 289, being the two multimeters I've focussed on to replace the POS I've been using for too long. :-)

The lowest priced source I've found for a Brymen BM869S and data link cable/software, shipped to Australia, is eleshop.eu https://eleshop.eu in The Netherlands. The data link interface was not showing on the English language version of their site, but here is a link to it in the Dutch part of the site. https://eleshop.eu/brymen-kitbu-86x-usb-connection-kit.html . Total price for the meter and datalink is EU$254.01 (including shipping which is EU$40). This is AUD$380, subject to variation.

The next lowest price was from TME in Poland. The BM869S and the KITBU-86S datalink kit are easy to find on their site. Total price - EU$268.76 (including EU$19.90 shipping). Or ~ AUD$402.

Re the Fluke 289, the story there is not so good. Tequipment in the US is a good source, if you live in the US!  >:(  After spending much time working with their excellent website I learned via a chat session that they can't/won't export to Australia (no news there for many on this forum it seems). The best price I found on their site, for logged in members, was USD$519, or AUD$696. This is for the meter only. The Fluke View Forms software and optical link to USB cable, and/or their IR3000FC Fluke Connect wireless interface are extra, best ordered in a kit with the meter.

The best price for a Fluke 289 from an Australian supplier (element14, formerly Farnell) was AUD$1253.70. That's for the multimeter only. Any POS calculator will show that this is close to double what folk in the US pay. Why?

In line with the topic of this thread, after much consideration my preference tipped in favour of the Fluke 289. I like the onboard data logging and display and the ability to beam it to my iPhone/iPad, via the modular IR3000FC interface, to then share the data with others, easily. I haven't ordered either yet, but chances are I'll end up with both, to use each for its strengths.

So, buying a Brymen BM869S is easy, but how do I buy a Fluke 289 (with FVF and IR3000FC and some sort of Flukey accessory cables/clips kit) without feeling like I've been treated as a second class citizen of the world? That is, ripped off!

Regards, Valden.

p.s. Brymen have just updated their website. It looks much more professional now. Good on 'em.
 

Offline Electro Detective

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Don't lose hope mate, a 289 or two pop up on Ebay straya occasionally, from $550 to $750 in good nick to brand new

The 289 has it's issues, but nothing life threatening. Make sure you have a warranty on it.

The Brymen may look good and can apparently survive some extreme carpet surfing, but who is going to fix it here in oz if it goes belly up?

And yes, aussies do get shafted on prices here, treated no better than shirtless, dumped, framed convicts with no choice in the matter.

Anyone holidaying from Mars or Uranus would quickly conclude that some sellers must think every potential Fluke buyer is a clueless overpaid showoff tradie  :-DMM

I sometimes see their point...   :o

 

Offline Muttley Snickers

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Generally speaking, each individuals requirements in relation to their tools and equipment will vary according to their particular field and the manner in which they work, like many here I own quite a number of handheld multimeters in a variety of brands, models, features and specifications, some of which are used more frequently than others and for me the Keysights are a prime example in this regard.

As you have already established some brands are not readily available down here at reasonable or comparable prices, others will not be covered by warranty if imported or would cost a packet to send them back, out of the two you have mentioned the Brymen would be my choice unless you have a specific need, otherwise if you can hold out for a bit longer rumour has it that Dave's new super meter is getting closer to release, I don't have any details on the final specifications.
 

Offline Fungus

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The Brymen may look good and can apparently survive some extreme carpet surfing, but who is going to fix it here in oz if it goes belly up?

If it's half the price then how important is that? You can simply buy another one. The chances of two of them failing is quite slim.

And as noted, the Fluke guarantee doesn't necessarily cover shipping, etc. Fixing a Fluke can cost money, too.
 

Offline nour

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When I was searching to buy my very first professional handheld meter, I was thinking everyone has the 87v so should I! :palm:
Why not, everyone is talking about it, everyone always shows up on youtube with it even some people have a selfie with it  :-DMM, but someone told me about the 869s and when I compared the features and the resolution with the 87V, it took me a couple of minutes to decide and buy the 869s.

Now, I am really grateful that I have bought the 869 instead of the 87V  :phew:

For electronics hobbyists and professionals, definitely, the 869s is the one to go(compared to the 87V)
Would I buy it again, Absolutely yes :-+
if what I have wrote doesn't make sense for you or you think there is something wrong, please correct me, I am still beginner and what I know probably less than what you know
 

Offline Electro Detective

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But can the Brymen get you unauthorised instant access to any job site like a Fluke can just by waving it around  :-DMM
and enjoy free crew food, dessert, coffee, tea, a couple of rolls of toilet paper,
chat up some not so butch females, and maybe score a tank full of car fuel too?

The 869 may handle extreme carpet surfing and wow the user with some eye candy, but I'm sticking with my yellow sugar mommy meters for now   :-DMM :-DMM 

;D
 

Offline coromonadalix

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Honestly   

I had a Mastech 22000 count dmm who was great, no need to open the case for changing the fuses,  changed for a Brymen 857S for more display resolution, and finally  set up for 2x Gossen MetraHit 28S  dmm,  i use at my job  Fluke 83 and 87 first series, not the III and V series.

I had problems with the rotary knob residues on pcb ... stranges beeps, power on/off problems, now it's ok nce cleaned correctly.

My partner use an 87 V model,  i hate it a lot,  now it is set in AC by default   erk ...

Every one has it's taste or needs, just check and read feedbacks, reviews, teardowns,  etc... before buying no need to start wars or criticize others  loll

My first meter was an Beckman Industrial model, ip65 at the time was a top notch option/feature,  if you use a meter within it's specs and with respect of it's capacities and functionality it will last ... 15 years with original fuses for my first dmm ???

Sure you have dielectric tests, drop tests, etc ... as i said, i dont need a meter that i can roll over it with my truck  loll, but it helps choosing the right model for my day to day use.

Finally  it depends on how much money you want to invest as a beginner or a professional tech / user / repair man ... or availability in certain countries. I had to have some help to find my Gossen in Germany, the shipping was desastrous in one case.

The dmm accessories  Ir / usb / serial /  bluetooth interfaces for Fluke Gossen Brymen ... should be automatically included with puchasing, or be at really cheap price,  that's my big complaint.
 
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Offline Fungus

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But can the Brymen get you unauthorised instant access to any job site like a Fluke can just by waving it around  :-DMM
and enjoy free crew food, dessert, coffee, tea, a couple of rolls of toilet paper,
chat up some not so butch females, and maybe score a tank full of car fuel too?

C'mon, you're exaggerating.

You need a Fluke plus at least a hard-hat and high-vis to score the fuel.
 

Offline Electro Detective

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But can the Brymen get you unauthorised instant access to any job site like a Fluke can just by waving it around  :-DMM
and enjoy free crew food, dessert, coffee, tea, a couple of rolls of toilet paper,
chat up some not so butch females, and maybe score a tank full of car fuel too?

C'mon, you're exaggerating.

You need a Fluke plus at least a hard-hat and high-vis to score the fuel.

oops, forgot about that, thanks for the heads up  :-+

 ;D
 

Offline P90

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one nice thing about Fluke meters is that they don't seem to drift out of calibration much...I've got 20 year old Flukes that are within a couple milivolts of each other and a couple precision  voltage references...
 

Offline Fungus

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one nice thing about Fluke meters is that they don't seem to drift out of calibration much...I've got 20 year old Flukes that are within a couple milivolts of each other and a couple precision  voltage references...

That's not really a Fluke thing. A lot of meters will do that, even really cheap ones.

The whole "calibration" thing is mostly just paying money for a document that covers your ass if you're sued over something.
 
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Offline P90

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one nice thing about Fluke meters is that they don't seem to drift out of calibration much...I've got 20 year old Flukes that are within a couple milivolts of each other and a couple precision  voltage references...

That's not really a Fluke thing. A lot of meters will do that, even really cheap ones.

The whole "calibration" thing is mostly just paying money for a document that covers your ass if you're sued over something.

yeah most decent quality meters with higher spec'd components shouldn't drift much. I don't really own any real cheap bottom of barrel meters, so nit sure how well they hold up...
 

Offline Fungus

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I don't really own any real cheap bottom of barrel meters, so nit sure how well they hold up...

You might be surprised.

I think it depends on usage. The parts that "drift" will actually be the mechanics - the range selector switch, etc.
 

Offline Valden

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I don't really own any real cheap bottom of barrel meters, so nit sure how well they hold up...

You might be surprised.

I think it depends on usage. The parts that "drift" will actually be the mechanics - the range selector switch, etc.

Bingo. It's exactly this dodgy range selector switch problem that has me in the market for a new (and good this time) meter.

Re my post above, where I grizzled about the huge price difference between US suppliers and those here in Australia, well, my request for an explanation has attracted a reply from one source in Oz, with an assurance that they'll be able to work out a better price. I'm still to see the outcome. I did say they're really going to have to work hard and was assured they would. Interesting. Fingers crossed. If it's a positive ending I'll ask if they want me to publicise that here.
 

Offline Fungus

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The parts that "drift" will actually be the mechanics - the range selector switch, etc.

Bingo. It's exactly this dodgy range selector switch problem that has me in the market for a new (and good this time) meter.

I believe Fluke et. al. put special grease on the PCB to prevent oxidation/wear of the tracks.

(I don't know how expensive it is or why it doesn't rub off.  :-// )

My Fluke 27 has a proper range selector in it, none of this PCB track rubbish:


« Last Edit: June 02, 2017, 09:42:43 am by Fungus »
 

Offline Electro Detective

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"PCB track rubbish" is fine for impoverished techs, EEs, and newbs

as long as you open the sucker once in a while to check the condition,

and maybe swap out the batteries too  :clap:

(Nice Fluke 27 internals btw) 
« Last Edit: June 02, 2017, 09:51:23 am by Electro Detective »
 

Offline Valden

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My Fluke 27 has a proper range selector in it,



In other words, 'That's not a range selector. This is a range selector!'

Impressive!
 

Offline 2N3055

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"PCB track rubbish" is fine for impoverished techs, EEs, and newbs

as long as you open the sucker once in a while to check the condition,

and maybe swap out the batteries too  :clap:

(Nice Fluke 27 internals btw) 

So absolutely every currently produced meter, including FLUKE, Keysight, Gossen....all of them are cheap crap to you... LOL...
 


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