Author Topic: Old Fluke Multimeters  (Read 230221 times)

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Offline mzacharias

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #500 on: May 07, 2018, 11:40:15 am »
I have a fluke 87 that the frame that clamps the lcd and conductive rubber has broken the little lugs.
Any ideas where I can buy these frames?

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If the case screws still tighten down OK, I have found that a few thicknesses of electrical tape near the top of the bottom shield (above the openings for the buzzer) helps to apply enough pressure for the LCD's to work, as soon as the case is tightened up.
 
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Offline Excavatoree

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #501 on: June 07, 2018, 05:47:11 pm »
I have a fluke 87 that the frame that clamps the lcd and conductive rubber has broken the little lugs.
Any ideas where I can buy these frames?

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Sorry for the late reply.   Unless it's a new Series V (5), you want Fluke part 619632.  I'm not sure if it's still available from Fluke or not.  Occaisionally, these show up on E-bay, especially from the notorious seller "A-Fluke." 

I worked on one that had several cardboard shims placed between the front case and the LCD frame, and the back case and the PCB to apply enough pressure.   Many do these repairs, and they seem to work, but I've never done it.
 

Offline 001

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #502 on: September 11, 2018, 07:22:06 am »
Tell me
what benefits of fluke 8010A for 2018?
When You use it really?

I see bunch of them at yours workbenches
 

Offline bd139

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #503 on: September 11, 2018, 07:53:47 am »
There is literally none whatsoever. Genuinely no advantage. In actual fact it's probably a liability and a time sink over something new. Unless it was free or so cheap it wasn't worth turning it down. If you need a meter and choose one of these and fix it, depending on what your time is worth you could probably cover a nice new Keysight meter for the cost.

But much like a classic car, you're not in the market for a practical device but a piece of history or something which you couldn't have when you were younger because it was expensive or difficult to get hold of at the time, or just because the indefinable quality of owning something like it.  It's a fun waste of time, and marginally more constructive than sitting in front of Netflix or taking drugs or something.
 
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Offline frozenfrogz

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #504 on: September 11, 2018, 09:46:34 am »
Using old equipment that is still going strong after years is a way of life - either you like it with all the quirks that may come with it, or not.
Personally I enjoy a lot of the design aspects and thought that went into a lot of old gear. That is why I am also running an old Kenwood A700D in my kitchen instead of a fancy new all in one wonder solution like the KCC9060S or that Thermomix abomination.

I would not use the 8010A for daily use though if I had to make a living on it - not because of accuracy concerns but because of legibility and working speed. (One day I will have the time to do a proper LED conversion...)

But basically bd139 already answered the question. :)
He’s like a trained ape. Without the training.
 
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Offline 001

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #505 on: September 11, 2018, 10:17:21 am »
I would not use the 8010A for daily use though if I had to make a living on it - not because of accuracy concerns but because of legibility and working speed. (One day I will have the time to do a proper LED conversion...)


I.e. You need only mains powered device with big LED digits, isnt it?
You sad about working speed
What do You mean since 8010A is manual range meter?

Thanx
 

Offline bd139

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #506 on: September 11, 2018, 10:37:14 am »
8010A is slow to settle on a reading. Only marginally slower than my U1241C though  >:(
 

Offline 001

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #507 on: September 11, 2018, 10:42:44 am »
This speed depends of input "integral" capasitor at this specific ADC
see 7106 chip appnote
may be some leakage etc
 

Offline GregDunn

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #508 on: September 11, 2018, 02:27:57 pm »
Seems old Fluke bench multimeters are somewhat under represented in this thread so let me contribute. Top to bottom:

8600A
8000A
8010A
8050A

And just peeking in lower left...

8021A
1st generation 87.

I'm really happy with my 8600A which I picked up from the same seller as the HP6236B at a hamfest.   I wouldn't mind having another, or even an 8800A; it seems stable and accurate, and I can read it from a mile away even in high ambient light.  While it might annoy some people, I actually like the loud relay click when it switches ranges; it alerts me that something has changed, even if I'm not looking at the meter.
 

Offline frozenfrogz

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #509 on: September 11, 2018, 02:59:37 pm »
You sad about working speed
What do You mean since 8010A is manual range meter?

I was not pointing to something specific, just overall convenience and speed because of general ease of reading the display or not having to switch ranges etc. It clearly depends on a lot of personal preferences.

Active LED display or a decent back light would make the 8010A much more convenient to use.
He’s like a trained ape. Without the training.
 
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Offline med6753

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #510 on: September 11, 2018, 03:10:08 pm »
Seems old Fluke bench multimeters are somewhat under represented in this thread so let me contribute. Top to bottom:

8600A
8000A
8010A
8050A

And just peeking in lower left...

8021A
1st generation 87.

I'm really happy with my 8600A which I picked up from the same seller as the HP6236B at a hamfest.   I wouldn't mind having another, or even an 8800A; it seems stable and accurate, and I can read it from a mile away even in high ambient light.  While it might annoy some people, I actually like the loud relay click when it switches ranges; it alerts me that something has changed, even if I'm not looking at the meter.

Since that original post in September of last year I've added a 8800A to the collection. This guy is dead accurate out to 4 digits when measuring the two AD584-M references and is my bench standard.

 
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Offline med6753

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #511 on: September 11, 2018, 03:28:04 pm »
Tell me
what benefits of fluke 8010A for 2018?
When You use it really?

I see bunch of them at yours workbenches

While bd139 and frozenfrogz pretty much summed it up there's a 3rd aspect. I like understanding how they work and fixing them. And yes, you can get them cheap. And most of the parts except for some Fluke specific items are readily available. Do I use it everyday? Nope. Do I keep it calibrated? Yep. Does it have faults? Yep and that dim LCD is a big one. But there's the satisfaction of keeping this old iron going that I completely enjoy.   
An old gray beard with an attitude.
 
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Offline GregDunn

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #512 on: September 11, 2018, 05:16:02 pm »

Since that original post in September of last year I've added a 8800A to the collection. This guy is dead accurate out to 4 digits when measuring the two AD584-M references and is my bench standard.



Yeah, my 8600A is my standard until proven wrong.  Hasn't happened yet.   ;D   Seriously, it tracks my three Fluke portables perfectly (considering resolution differences of course) whereas the other meters tend to deviate from them at the higher or lower ranges, which would be less likely if the 8600A was out.  (sigh) I guess I have to set my sights on an 8800A now...
 

Offline particleman

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #513 on: September 11, 2018, 05:41:25 pm »
My Flukes. I use them every day.
 

Offline GregDunn

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #514 on: September 11, 2018, 07:04:16 pm »
TWO of them.  Nice.   :-+  Is it worth scanning the Bay for an inexpensive one (there seem to be two prices: $400 and $50 ;D ) these days?  I seem to recall people mentioning that a lot of DMMs get sold as "for parts" even though they're somewhat functional and repairable - is that likely with an 8800?  I've never had to fix a Fluke meter so I don't know what I might be getting into; but if it's a reasonable thing to look for I can certainly start watching for one.
 

Offline particleman

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #515 on: September 11, 2018, 07:34:46 pm »
TWO of them.  Nice.   :-+  Is it worth scanning the Bay for an inexpensive one (there seem to be two prices: $400 and $50 ;D ) these days?  I seem to recall people mentioning that a lot of DMMs get sold as "for parts" even though they're somewhat functional and repairable - is that likely with an 8800?  I've never had to fix a Fluke meter so I don't know what I might be getting into; but if it's a reasonable thing to look for I can certainly start watching for one.
Both of my 8800A we bought locally from the popular classified site. C21 had leaked on both of them. Recapped them both cleaned the switches had them calibrated ($40 each) and have not had 1 issue with them in the 5 years I have had them.
 
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Offline rsjsouza

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #516 on: September 11, 2018, 09:13:35 pm »
TWO of them.  Nice.   :-+  Is it worth scanning the Bay for an inexpensive one (there seem to be two prices: $400 and $50 ;D ) these days?  I seem to recall people mentioning that a lot of DMMs get sold as "for parts" even though they're somewhat functional and repairable - is that likely with an 8800?  I've never had to fix a Fluke meter so I don't know what I might be getting into; but if it's a reasonable thing to look for I can certainly start watching for one.
The hardest fix I had to do was to repair my dad's old 8020A (portable) where the LCD had leaked. I followed Mr. Modemhead's procedure.

The other two (8060A and 8062A) only required capacitor replacements.

My Fluke 27/FM has a fading LCD, but I expect it to be a simple cleaning job of the zebra strips. 
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Oh, the "whys" of the datasheets... The information is there not to be an axiomatic truth, but instead each speck of data must be slowly inhaled while carefully performing a deep search inside oneself to find the true metaphysical sense...
 

Offline med6753

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #517 on: September 12, 2018, 12:28:17 am »
TWO of them.  Nice.   :-+  Is it worth scanning the Bay for an inexpensive one (there seem to be two prices: $400 and $50 ;D ) these days?  I seem to recall people mentioning that a lot of DMMs get sold as "for parts" even though they're somewhat functional and repairable - is that likely with an 8800?  I've never had to fix a Fluke meter so I don't know what I might be getting into; but if it's a reasonable thing to look for I can certainly start watching for one.

Going after the sub $100 USD Flukes on Ebay can be a total crap shoot. In my collection of Flukes it has ranged from just needing a tweak (8050A) to major repair (8010A). The others fell somewhere in between those 2 extremes. In all cases I purchased "powers up but not tested" which we all know is the bullshit statement that you can't return it if it doesn't work. So I knew what I was getting into and was prepared to perform repairs if required.

The exception was the 8800A. It was advertised as fully functional for the bargain price of $80 USD plus shipping. So I jumped on it right away. But it did not work when I received it. Power up but no measuring and wouldn't zero. I contacted the seller immediately and praised him for his packaging (was excellent) but unfortunately the DMM does not work. He responded in less than an hour and apologized and offered to refund me $60 USD plus I could keep the DMM. I was flabbergasted that he would make an offer like that and I accepted. And he made good on the refund. Within a day $60 USD was refunded. The best part is within 15 minutes of opening up the 8800A I found the problem. C18 was shorted dragging down the +35V to +25V. I recapped the entire power supply and started calibration and discovered that all parameters were dead nuts. No adjustments required. So it turned out to be an excellent score and sometimes it goes in your favor.  :-+       
« Last Edit: September 12, 2018, 12:30:45 am by med6753 »
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Offline GregDunn

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #518 on: September 12, 2018, 04:08:00 am »
Yes, I've done the 8020A fix; that was a lot of fun.   >:D

Sounds like auction site purchases for this instrument come down to "do you feel lucky, punk?" and willingness to dive in and fix odd failure modes.  I guess that's why I like hamfests - if you can actually find something you have hands-on right away and an honest seller will let you power it up first.

Thanks, all, for the info.  I'll think about my next step...
 

Offline bitseeker

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #519 on: September 12, 2018, 05:25:58 am »
Next step: Buy half a dozen of them and Dr. Frankenstein a good one or three from that DMM morgue.  :-DMM
I TEA.
 

Offline bd139

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #520 on: September 12, 2018, 06:03:27 am »
Sounds like auction site purchases for this instrument come down to "do you feel lucky, punk?" and willingness to dive in and fix odd failure modes.  I guess that's why I like hamfests - if you can actually find something you have hands-on right away and an honest seller will let you power it up first.

Hamfests are just as bad usually. Most of the ones here don't bless you with power so you have to take a gamble. Last one I got very lucky though. Some of the sellers were probably more dodgy than eBay however.

Next step: Buy half a dozen of them and Dr. Frankenstein a good one or three from that DMM morgue.  :-DMM

TEA pimp in action :)
 

Offline bitseeker

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #521 on: September 12, 2018, 06:08:47 am »
At your service. ^-^
I TEA.
 
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Offline GregDunn

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #522 on: September 12, 2018, 07:02:15 am »
Sounds like auction site purchases for this instrument come down to "do you feel lucky, punk?" and willingness to dive in and fix odd failure modes.  I guess that's why I like hamfests - if you can actually find something you have hands-on right away and an honest seller will let you power it up first.

Hamfests are just as bad usually. Most of the ones here don't bless you with power so you have to take a gamble. Last one I got very lucky though. Some of the sellers were probably more dodgy than eBay however.


I agree you need to be wary, but generally around here you get the "tailgaters" (people who bring dodgy gear in the back of their truck and sell it in the parking lot) as well as the "insiders" (table space inside a building, often commercial vendors or small businesses).  The indoor spaces are usually furnished with power and the sellers are more likely to be accommodating; you just have to size them up carefully.  When I bought my 8600A, the guy pretty much insisted that I let him power up the DMM and the HP power supply before taking my money.  The Keithley 197A was bought from a known commercial dealer in the area who was selling it for a friend he called on the phone to verify the price.  I plugged it into a convenient wall outlet to make sure it at least powered up.  I'll deal with people like that all day in preference to the unknown quantity eBay sellers.  If only there was a good fest more than 2-3 times a year in this area.

And then there are shady vendors like the one a few years ago who had a nasty looking pile of used radio parts stripped from who-knows-what, trying to sell me a "matched" pair of EL34 tubes for $120.  Pull the other one, dude.   :-DD
 
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Offline elecdonia

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #523 on: September 12, 2018, 05:58:00 pm »
I'm another person who loves old-fashioned red LED displays.  I use both the Fluke 8600A and the 8800A on a daily basis.  Currently I own 5 8600A units and 3 8800A units.  All were obtained from ebay at prices ranging from $20 to $50 each.  I also have a big box full of spare parts taken from additional units that weren't easily repairable.

Over time I've learned how to fix these meters and calibrate them.  My recommendations:
When you first get an 8600A or 8800A I recommend checking the ESR of every electrolytic capacitor in the power supply.  Or just replace them if you don't own an ESR meter.
For the battery powered version of the 8600A you should immediately replace the old NiCd D cells.  There are 4 of them.  The battery powered 8600A won't work unless the NiCd cells are good.  I recommend using NiCd batteries.  NiMH won't last very long due to the extremely primitive charging circuit in the 8600A.  NiCd cells handle continuous overcharge much better than NiMH.  Also take great care to totally clean off all bits of battery goo from the PC boards when you have a battery powered 8600A.
Do not switch on the 8600A with any of the small plug in PC boards removed -- doing so may cause failure of the IC chip that controls the relays.

For calibration I have a good quality 10V reference voltage source and a HP 3456A 6.5 digit DVM.  I've found the stability and long-term calibration of my 8600A and 8800A units to be excellent.

 
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Offline GregDunn

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #524 on: September 12, 2018, 10:38:18 pm »
I have a non-battery 8600A; but perhaps it's a good idea to check/replace the caps anyway.  I'm doing a voltage reference comparison right now, but when that's done I can pop it open.  Looks like the electrolytics are easily available values.  Is there any value to replacing tantalum caps too?  I know older HP gear has a problem with them.
 


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