Author Topic: Old Fluke Multimeters  (Read 229908 times)

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Offline GLouie

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #625 on: January 12, 2019, 06:44:16 pm »
Nice find, DC1MC, although the date codes look like 1985 to me.

I would look very carefully at the bases of all the electrolytic capacitors and consider replacing them anyway. I used my 8060A since new for over 30 years before it quit, due to leaking caps. Fortunately, the damage was not too bad and I replaced all the caps as per Modemhead.
 

Offline GregDunn

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #626 on: January 12, 2019, 09:49:59 pm »
Interesting. I was curious about the original prices too. Even $299 USD for a 8000A was big bucks back then. (That's almost $1600 USD in today's dollars)

That list is too early for the 8010A and 8050A which came out quite a few years later, not until the 1980's. They would be probably roughly equivalent to the 8000A and 8600A in price although the 8050A doesn't have auto ranging.

Finally dug through the R-E archive and found a later partial price list which answers your question:
 

Offline Neomys Sapiens

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #627 on: January 13, 2019, 02:48:20 am »

Truer words never been spoken  ;D, I've snagged this Fluke 8060A from the Kleinanzeigen for 15 euro coins.
.
.
I hope that I find the leftover carry-case until when I finally get that counter ready.

Anyways, now he got his place on my desk and you could enjoy some pictures, my mains frequency it's really 50Hz ;).


Only when you are looking!
 

Online med6753

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #628 on: January 13, 2019, 05:27:39 am »
Those price lists are interesting and they show what is very typical in the electronics industry...that is....as technology matures the price decreases. Examples:

8000A - 1974 price - $299 USD ($1600 USD today). The equivalent 8010A - 1980 price - $239 USD ($768 USD today).

But the biggest surprise was comparing the 8600A to the roughly equivalent 8050A. (Similar specs but 8050A doesn't have auto range)

8600A - 1974 price - $599 USD ($3200 USD today). 8050A - 1980 price - $329 USD ($1000 USD today).
An old gray beard with an attitude.
 

Offline GregDunn

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #629 on: January 13, 2019, 06:23:40 am »
Yes, the improvement of chip technology led to economies of scale and reduced prices for quite a while.  I haven't actually tried to swap the chips, but when Fluke introduced autoranging, they started putting the same part number C2506 DVM chip in their DMMs - if you can trust the Fluke part number, it's in both the 4.5 digit 8600A and the 5.5 digit 8800A.  The schematic tends to confirm this.  The way they operate the display, it makes sense that the same chip could be used for both - the actual accuracy was determined by the ADC anyway, so technically I guess they could have made the 8600A a 5.5 digit meter with 4.5 digit accuracy by adding another LED/driver.   >:D

The 8000A has a totally different set of internals - it uses a voltage-to-frequency converter instead of a dual-slope ADC and has a pair of custom ICs to implement that while the range switching stuff is mostly discrete.  So it's kind of the complement of the 8600A where the ADC is mostly discrete.  Must have been cheaper to do that, plus it's only 3.5 digits.

Since I was stuck at home in the snow today, I did an impromptu check of my bench DMMs against my 3 voltage references and my MC-7 resistor "standard".  Considering that none of the Flukes have been adjusted in a long time, they held up pretty well; there was very little to choose between the 8800A and 8600A units on overall DCV accuracy.  I wish I had actual measurements of my MC-7 though, instead of just the accuracy spec - it's really unknown which meters are closer to the accurate value and which are a victim of the resistors being slightly different from the marked value (the eternal metrology dilemma).  Assuming the resistors are spot on, all of the DMMs beat 0.03% and all were very linear over the full range of resistance.  In fact, my $10 8600A converted from battery to line operation "seemed" to be more accurate than the 8800A units, within the limits of resolution.  I wouldn't hesitate to use any of them for bench testing.

40 year old meters.  Great stuff.

 

Offline DC1MC

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #630 on: January 13, 2019, 08:51:34 am »

Truer words never been spoken  ;D, I've snagged this Fluke 8060A from the Kleinanzeigen for 15 euro coins.
.
.
I hope that I find the leftover carry-case until when I finally get that counter ready.

Anyways, now he got his place on my desk and you could enjoy some pictures, my mains frequency it's really 50Hz ;).


Only when you are looking!

Was it you ?  cool  8), I want that carry case (and the f-meter of course) !!!

And yes, it's a Schrödinger-ian  frequency  >:D




 Cheers,
 DC1MC
 

Offline Martin.M

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #631 on: January 13, 2019, 09:07:19 am »
that 8500A is also wake up.
In the Option Card Calibration Memory was both batteries empty. = Errors.
bec. it is a option I have removed the card an the 8500A starts working.
batteries required, ebay

its not a true 6 1/2 digits, or there is a trick to use that full, or its required the cal memory card for using 6 1/2

Martin
 

Offline Neomys Sapiens

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #632 on: January 13, 2019, 08:55:14 pm »

Was it you ?  cool  8), I want that carry case (and the f-meter of course) !!!

And yes, it's a Schrödinger-ian  frequency  >:D

No, wasn't me. But I once had a 8060, whose sad demise I described somewhere here.
And the softcase is still around (I think it must be right along with the ugly discarded yellow holster for the 87, which I replaced with the grey one).
And the counter is not available, but still uncalibrated. I have a new OCXO (10811), now I have to find the UNC screws, because I'm not willing to order a whole pack.
That said, the holster is a giveaway when I call about the calibration.
 

Offline Neomys Sapiens

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #633 on: January 13, 2019, 09:11:35 pm »
BTW, I don't think the 8060 was made in'81. My 'datecode' is '66 and I was 16 when I bought mine.
It was newly out, with a large feature about it in the 'Elektronik',  then the German lead periodical on professional electronics.
I remember the Fluke advertising, which did show a guy in a labcoat riding a scooter with a lot of T&M gear strapped on (which the 8060 was supposed to replace). They prominently reused it in the 'Elektronik' (with Fluke Co.'s permission, I think)  for a title page discussing (for the first time) the topic of engineering temp jobs and -agencies.
I also remember vividly how my grumpy boss of those years (an Ingenieurbuero, where I worked during my holidays and after school) told me to buy a large analogue meter with FETs (Unigor 6e), because on that digital things you can't observe changing values. The measurement rate of the 8060 made him look twice and muttering a 'maybe, could work'.
 

Offline DC1MC

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #634 on: January 13, 2019, 10:04:23 pm »
I was just looking on the PCB date, it may be a bit younger, but still unvelivable precise.

 Cheers,
 DC1MC
 

Online rsjsouza

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #635 on: January 13, 2019, 11:14:50 pm »
Neomys, I suspect you mean 8600 - the 8060 is newer than the 8020, which was designed by the original poster of this thread.
Vbe - vídeo blog eletrônico http://videos.vbeletronico.com

Oh, the "whys" of the datasheets... The information is there not to be an axiomatic truth, but instead each speck of data must be slowly inhaled while carefully performing a deep search inside oneself to find the true metaphysical sense...
 

Offline Neomys Sapiens

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #636 on: January 13, 2019, 11:17:55 pm »
Neomys, I suspect you mean 8600 - the 8060 is newer than the 8020, which was designed by the original poster of this thread.
Nope. I said that '81 is too early for an 8060. Maybe you misunderstood that 'my datecode' - I'm born 66, so it must have been '83 when it appeared.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 11:20:51 pm by Neomys Sapiens »
 
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Offline GregDunn

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #637 on: January 14, 2019, 12:29:56 am »
I wish I could find the post, but a member actually emailed Fluke asking about the manufacture date on his 8060 and was told June 1980.  Others have reported 1980-1981 chip dates on their units, which is not conclusive.  But the easiest way would be to ask drtaylor the designer - if he doesn't know, no one does.  ;)
 

Online rsjsouza

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #638 on: January 14, 2019, 02:12:49 am »
Neomys, I suspect you mean 8600 - the 8060 is newer than the 8020, which was designed by the original poster of this thread.
Nope. I said that '81 is too early for an 8060. Maybe you misunderstood that 'my datecode' - I'm born 66, so it must have been '83 when it appeared.
Duh, got it. You were one of the lucky private persons that actually bought an 8060A at that time. (only a dream for me).  :-+
Vbe - vídeo blog eletrônico http://videos.vbeletronico.com

Oh, the "whys" of the datasheets... The information is there not to be an axiomatic truth, but instead each speck of data must be slowly inhaled while carefully performing a deep search inside oneself to find the true metaphysical sense...
 

Offline GLouie

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #639 on: January 14, 2019, 06:40:45 am »
Of course drtaylor will know. He posted several documents and some early flyers that are dated 1982.

I got my 8060A in July 1982 and my manual says March 1982, so I think at least in USA they were available by then. I suspect the 1981 date on early circuit boards is the original board design copyright date, which they might've used for several years.
 

Offline drtaylor

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #640 on: January 14, 2019, 07:11:29 am »
8060 Prototype was in 81. First customer units in 1982.
 
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Offline GregDunn

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #641 on: January 18, 2019, 03:58:49 am »
Again, a link to my 8800A/AF repair thread, finally concluded with success:

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/repair/fluke-8800aaf-power-supply-parts/
 

Offline 4thDoctorWhoFan

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #642 on: January 19, 2019, 10:46:20 pm »
Here is my Fluke 8400A.
It still works great & I do use it on occasion.

BTW, does anyone know if there are banana plug adapters that will change the plug from the shielded type to the non shielded type? 
I would like to use normal multimeter probes with the Fluke 8400A but it only accepts normal unshielded banana plug.

P1010031 (2)
 
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Offline bitseeker

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #643 on: January 20, 2019, 01:09:43 am »
Beautiful 8400A, Doc!

Search engines are your friend: "shrouded to unshrouded banana plug adapter converter"
I TEA.
 

Offline IconicPCB

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #644 on: January 20, 2019, 03:57:08 am »
clean uncluttered lines
 

Offline 4thDoctorWhoFan

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #645 on: January 20, 2019, 02:11:02 pm »
Beautiful 8400A, Doc!

Search engines are your friend: "shrouded to unshrouded banana plug adapter converter"

Thanks!
BTW, I did search but I found nothing & now I realize why.  DUH,  I searched for the terms shielded instead of shrouded. :)
 

Offline bitseeker

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #646 on: January 21, 2019, 12:34:28 am »
No worries. Glad to help out.

By the way, which options does your 8400 have?
I TEA.
 

Offline Neomys Sapiens

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #647 on: January 21, 2019, 09:27:39 pm »
Here is my Fluke 8400A.
It still works great & I do use it on occasion.

BTW, does anyone know if there are banana plug adapters that will change the plug from the shielded type to the non shielded type? 
I would like to use normal multimeter probes with the Fluke 8400A but it only accepts normal unshielded banana plug.

P1010031 (2)
There are two basic types of such adaptors:
One is simply a shrouded jack inline with a unshouded plug. Most of the time they cling to the shrouded plug which is connected to them, instead of the unshrouded jack, which would be better in terms of safety. (available from SKS, Staeubli, Pomona, Fluke) A variant has the unshrouded plug fitted with a spring-loaded shroud, which is better. (Available from SKS, red only)
The other type is fitted with a spreader mechanism, which is actuated by a small set screw in the shrouded jack and it is therefore affixed reliably to the unshrouded jack on the instrument. (available from SKS and Staeubli, multiple colours)
 

Offline 4thDoctorWhoFan

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #648 on: January 21, 2019, 09:48:33 pm »
No worries. Glad to help out.

By the way, which options does your 8400 have?

It only has options 1 & 2 which are the AC & OHMS converter.
 

Offline 4thDoctorWhoFan

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Re: Old Fluke Multimeters
« Reply #649 on: January 21, 2019, 09:49:21 pm »
Here is my Fluke 8400A.
It still works great & I do use it on occasion.

BTW, does anyone know if there are banana plug adapters that will change the plug from the shielded type to the non shielded type? 
I would like to use normal multimeter probes with the Fluke 8400A but it only accepts normal unshielded banana plug.

P1010031 (2)
There are two basic types of such adaptors:
One is simply a shrouded jack inline with a unshouded plug. Most of the time they cling to the shrouded plug which is connected to them, instead of the unshrouded jack, which would be better in terms of safety. (available from SKS, Staeubli, Pomona, Fluke) A variant has the unshrouded plug fitted with a spring-loaded shroud, which is better. (Available from SKS, red only)
The other type is fitted with a spreader mechanism, which is actuated by a small set screw in the shrouded jack and it is therefore affixed reliably to the unshrouded jack on the instrument. (available from SKS and Staeubli, multiple colours)

Thanks for the great explanation.  I will look into them.
 


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