Author Topic: Old Hioki Analog Meter and Questions  (Read 279 times)

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Offline bnordlund

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Old Hioki Analog Meter and Questions
« on: August 21, 2020, 05:51:45 am »
I have a lovely Hioki analog multimeter, model SE-37B.  I found it while cleaning out an elderly relative's house.  He had a decades-long electronics career, and was a respectable test equipment hoarder.  After a bit of cleanup and resoldering of a couple of joints, it is working great.

In addition to the normal V, I and Ohms scales, it also has scales for inductance and capacitance.  The meter face says to use the 10V AC for the inductance scale and 50V AC for the capacitance scale.  Since there are no active components inside this meter, I am guessing that an external signal source might be required.

Is anyone familiar with how these measurements would be made?  I have a somewhat dangerous theory where line voltage is applied across the meter in series with the component under test, but it might be more healthy to avoid that experiment!  I have not found any manuals on line either for the SE-37B, or for the SE-37A, which was a similar model.

Does anyone remember how this would have been used, or maybe even have a manual?  Lacking that, maybe someone has a theory to throw out for discussion.

I'll includes a couple photos in case there are others who enjoy this old gear like I do..

Brian
Beaverton, OR
 

Offline mqsaharan

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Re: Old Hioki Analog Meter and Questions
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2020, 01:41:44 am »
...
In addition to the normal V, I and Ohms scales, it also has scales for inductance and capacitance.  The meter face says to use the 10V AC for the inductance scale and 50V AC for the capacitance scale.  Since there are no active components inside this meter, I am guessing that an external signal source might be required.

Is anyone familiar with how these measurements would be made?  I have a somewhat dangerous theory where line voltage is applied across the meter in series with the component under test, but it might be more healthy to avoid that experiment!
...

You already know it.
I have a Sanwa U-50D. It also has scales for capacitance as well as high resistance functions. I have never tried to use these functions. I am including its manual. Please take a look at pages 28-30. It confirms what you already know.
 

Offline bnordlund

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Re: Old Hioki Analog Meter and Questions
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2020, 06:42:46 pm »
Aha! Thank you very much!  Not only are these meters from a time when the design and assembly reflected great pride, I always enjoy reading documentation that is so well done.

I do have another mystery, relating to this meter.  In the carry case, there was a 70 ohm power resistor with a clip on one end and a push on terminal on the other end.  My relative was an appliance repairman, so that is the main clue.  Whatever the task was, it must have been common enough to justify making this item.  70 ohms is a little high to be a current shunt, but maybe something to detect small leakage currents to ground?

Thanks again,
Brian.
 

Offline mqsaharan

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Re: Old Hioki Analog Meter and Questions
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2020, 10:24:06 am »
Aha! Thank you very much!  Not only are these meters from a time when the design and assembly reflected great pride, I always enjoy reading documentation that is so well done.

I do have another mystery, relating to this meter.  In the carry case, there was a 70 ohm power resistor with a clip on one end and a push on terminal on the other end.  My relative was an appliance repairman, so that is the main clue.  Whatever the task was, it must have been common enough to justify making this item.  70 ohms is a little high to be a current shunt, but maybe something to detect small leakage currents to ground?

Thanks again,
Brian.

You are welcome.
I guess you are right. It does seem OK and in some cases a good idea to use it for measuring small leakage currents to ground as the chassis used to be metal frames back then. Otherwise, I have no clue where or for what purpose he could be using that 70 ohm resistor.
But there are many seasoned repair personnel on this forum. Maybe somebody could shed some light on its (regular) use in the repair work.
 


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