Author Topic: PM203 duct tape removal?  (Read 1415 times)

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Offline Floopy

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PM203 duct tape removal?
« on: April 16, 2019, 06:15:09 pm »
I recently acquired a Tektronix PM203, aside that the guy literally threw the item in a box and taped there seems to be duct tape residue. It sticks like tare and I've spent 30 minutes scrubbing the side with IA with little success. Anyone have a better way of removing the gunk? It's on the probe cable also!
-Floopy
 

Offline cvanc

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2019, 06:28:20 pm »
Citrus-based cleaners (example: Goo Gone) are really good at removing sticky goo.  Good luck.
 
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Offline Floopy

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2019, 06:42:33 pm »
I just had someone suggest using WD-40 and it comes right of!
I feel kind of ridiculous asking this now, thank you anyway.
-Floopy
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2019, 08:14:22 pm »
Kontact Kemie does a product called Label Off 50, and it works wonders for this as well. Plus it will, once it has evaporated, allow you to put the label back on if desired, as it leaves the glue still sticky. Old labels it will not be sticky, but it will remove them if soaked, and is generally safe, except on screen printed surfaces, so keep away from Tek knobs with the back printed legends.
 

Offline Old Printer

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2019, 01:05:46 pm »
WD40 is a great find, I'll put that on my "solvent" shelf. I keep a dozen or so solvents at hand and when fighting an unknown adhesive I start with the least aggressive and work slowly toward the most. Kind of IPA to MEK with lacquer thinner in the middle. In the US Goof-Off is a useful product, but needs to be approached with caution. There is a fine line between getting the gunk off and melting the component underneath.
 

Online edavid

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2019, 01:55:24 pm »
The problem with Goo Gone and WD-40 is getting the smell off.  It's much better to use heptane, which is almost odorless, to remove the gunk.  In the US it's widely available as "Bestine Thinner".
« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 04:38:15 pm by edavid »
 

Offline Floopy

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2019, 04:25:14 pm »
I ended up using glass cleaner and a whole lot of scrubbing to get the smell and oil out.
-Floopy
 

Offline Old Printer

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2019, 01:06:05 pm »
The problem with Goo Gone and WD-40 is getting the smell off.  It's much better to use heptane, which is almost odorless, to remove the gunk.  In the US it's widely available as "Bestine Thinner".

I think this is similar or the same as naptha and also sold as Zippo or Ronson lighter fluid. I use a lot of it at work and it is right in the middle of my solvent shelf. Good at dissolving many adhesives, pretty safe for most finishes and leaves almost nothing behind, not much odor either.
 

Offline MarkL

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2019, 10:26:03 pm »
If the adhesive is still tacky, I usually start with Gorilla Tape, which is a heavy duty duct tape with extra strong adhesive.

I tear off a few inches of tape, press it onto whatever I'm trying to remove, and then pull it off, repeatedly, while moving around to fresh areas of adhesive on the tape.  Usually the old adhesive will prefer to stick to the Gorilla Tape.

If that doesn't work, *then* it's time for the line-up of increasingly aggressive solvents.

I would be careful with Goof-Off, however.  It's great on bare metal and some surfaces, but I had it go right through the insulation on a ribbon cable trying to do exactly what you're attempting.  Oops.
 

Offline Old Printer

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2019, 04:00:34 am »

I would be careful with Goof-Off, however.  It's great on bare metal and some surfaces, but I had it go right through the insulation on a ribbon cable trying to do exactly what you're attempting.  Oops.

Hence my comment, needs to be approached with caution .
 

Offline CatalinaWOW

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2019, 04:23:30 am »
I use charcoal lighter fluid.  Cheap.  Widely available and many people have it on hand for its intended purpose.  In my experience it is not aggressive enough of a solvent to harm the things you don't want to harm, but works pretty quickly on most adhesives and also on nasty messes like degraded rubber.  It is not particularly volatile so doesn't disappear before you can use it, and many brands are relatively odor free.

Like most of the solvents mentioned it must be handled with care.  Lots of ventilation, take precautions appropriate to its flammability and be concerned about contact with your skin. 
 

Offline gbaddeley

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2019, 11:34:32 am »
An alternative to solvents, particularly for removing sticky residue from delicate plastic (such as clear analog meter front panels) is canola oil rubbed lightly with a cotton bud. Very gentle and does not mar the plastic. Even mild solvents will destroy clear plastic.
Glenn
 

Offline alsetalokin4017

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Re: PM203 duct tape removal?
« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2019, 10:31:25 pm »
I use charcoal lighter fluid.  Cheap.  Widely available and many people have it on hand for its intended purpose.  In my experience it is not aggressive enough of a solvent to harm the things you don't want to harm, but works pretty quickly on most adhesives and also on nasty messes like degraded rubber.  It is not particularly volatile so doesn't disappear before you can use it, and many brands are relatively odor free.

Like most of the solvents mentioned it must be handled with care.  Lots of ventilation, take precautions appropriate to its flammability and be concerned about contact with your skin.

This. It's naphtha, basically. Cheaper than buying it in the paint department, works great, doesn't attack finishes. Luthiers use it to clean guitars.
The easiest person to fool is yourself. -- Richard Feynman
 


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