Author Topic: Question related RTB2000: I2C  (Read 571 times)

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Offline Frank_MV

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Question related RTB2000: I2C
« on: November 11, 2020, 07:50:39 pm »
Hello to the RTB2000 experts,
does anyone know if it is possible to search for a specific I2C pattern ?
For example, for a specific response from an I2C slave ?

br,
Frank
 

Offline switchabl

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2020, 08:58:56 pm »
I think Shahriar showed that in his review: https://youtu.be/YokF2_EbfIk?t=3138

EDIT: I re-read your question and maybe what you wanted to do was not triggering on a pattern, but searching the bus table. I don't really know about that.

Btw there is an existing thread on the RTB. If you post your future questions there, there is less clutter and people who have one themselves and follow that thread will see them faster.
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/new-killer-scope-a-true-game-changer-from-rs-rtb2002-rtb2004/
« Last Edit: November 11, 2020, 09:19:24 pm by switchabl »
 

Offline Frank_MV

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2020, 07:03:57 pm »
Thanks for the links.
Yes, you are right, my question belongs in the already known thread about RTB

No, I mean an I2C response from the slave
Simple example:  I read a complete i2c-eeprom and want to know if there is a certain 8-bit value under it.

Maybe the moderator of this forum can move my question to the already existing thread of RTB2000
 

Online nctnico

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2020, 07:31:44 pm »
The only way I'm aware of is to dump the data to CSV and analyse on a PC using Excel.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 
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Offline Frank_MV

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2020, 07:57:57 pm »
Okay, thanks.
so unfortunately the search is not possible within the RTB2000 - what a pity.
Not even a simple 8-bit pattern  :(

But maybe this would be a feature, but probably only for the expensive models RTM,RTA
« Last Edit: November 12, 2020, 08:01:56 pm by Frank_MV »
 

Offline 2N3055

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2020, 08:04:53 pm »
RTB2000 doesn't have search on common serial protocols, only on CAN and LIN.

I asked about that 2 years ago, and it didn't happen.

That is a perk when you buy expensive but entry level A-brand equipment.... All kinds of stuff you think should be there because you paid more than GW Instek or Rigol (who has that functionality) are not there... Because you bought something from the bottom of their food chain. It cannot be fully featured, because they need to give you reason to buy those 20000+ USD scopes...

Fun fact, not even much more expensive 3000/4000 series have that search....
 
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Offline Frank_MV

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2020, 07:25:55 am »
Maybe I should have chosen GW-Instek or Rigol instead.  :-\

Thanks

BTW: Is there at all anything that makes an RTB2000 better than GW-Instek, Rigol and Siglent ?  :phew:
« Last Edit: November 13, 2020, 09:31:09 am by Frank_MV »
 

Offline Frank_MV

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2020, 10:00:32 am »
I just bought it and could still exchange it within the next 3 weeks
;-)
 

Offline Pinkus

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2020, 10:11:10 am »
Maybe I should have chosen GW-Instek or Rigol instead.  :-\
BTW: Is there at all anything that makes an RTB2000 better than GW-Instek, Rigol and Siglent ?  :phew:
Unfortunately not a lot. Though the marketing guys of R&S don't care about end users and these few extra scopes they might sell into this segment (and loosing some against Siglent & Co.). Their interest are larger volumes they sell to companies and universities.
 

Online nctnico

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2020, 10:15:05 am »
Maybe I should have chosen GW-Instek or Rigol instead.  :-\

Thanks

BTW: Is there at all anything that makes an RTB2000 better than GW-Instek, Rigol and Siglent ?  :phew:
Between the two other options the RTB2000 has a bigger (touch) screen, and a much nicer UI compared to both especially when it comes to decoding. Otherwise the GW Instek MSO2000 series has similar functionality (including using the full memory if you tell the oscilloscope to use the full memory).
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline 2N3055

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2020, 11:50:38 am »
It is never easy.

R&S 2000 has 10 bit converter and works well with low signals. Also it has very good U/I concept, nice layout of screen for decoders, large hires touch screen (although shiny). It doesn't have 50 Ohm inputs. No searches of basic serial protocols (only CAN and LIN), and severely limited use of otherwise huge memory in a segmented mode, that is implemented as more of datasheet checklist feature than useful stuff.

GW Instek has much lower sample rate, lover max bandwidth, smaller no touch screen, U/I that is old school, but it is rock solid ( as in less buggy than R&S, on the level of Keysight), and many, many simply brilliant little things that just work as you would expect. It also doesn't have fancy phosphor emulation (it has some but not best I'we seen, which might be a problem or not depending on how people like it). Also no 50 Ohm input terminations.
All in all, very good and useful tool, well worth it's money.

Then you have newest Siglent SDS200X+. Very much similar to RTB2000 in concept (big touch screen, not shiny, GUI made for touch). Only 8 bit, but very low noise inputs and goes down to  500uV/div, large memory and as Nico will probably point it out, that is managed a bit differently than R&S, in manner like Picoscopes and Lecroy. That gives you seamless history frames and usable segmented mode with tools to manage it. It has tons of options and measurements, including Cycle To Cycle Jitter and histicons and histograms (LeCroy style), arbitrary math etc....
It also doesn't have serial protocols search, but unlike R&S who plainly said they don't plan to do it ever, they promised it will be added in due time.
SDS2000X+ is still being actively developed, and many improvements have been added to it since release.

So you see, there is no "one ring to rule them all".  T&M equipment is expensive sport. Best strategy is to buy only equipment you really need right  now.
Equipment is getting cheaper and better all the time.  I firmly believe that days of "I'm gonna buy me a Mercedes, and keep it for 20 years" are gone.

So, you have to decide which things you really need, and which you don't, and just buy whatever fits that description in a budget you have.

For instance I wanted to buy RTM3000 2 years ago. I didn't. I bought Keysight MSOX3000T instead.
RTM3000 didn't have serial protocol searches and segmented memory management that is useful (and they still don't have it). MSOX3000T has it and it both search on everything and search, decode and measure with stats over full segmented memory. Also RTM3000 has better resolution FFT (and fabulous SA mode) than MSOX3000T, but that wasn't a problem. Keysight implementation is still very good for a FFT on a scope, and for more details and real SA work you need separate real SA anyways. MSOX3000T also came with tons of protocol decodes, etc. etc.
RTM3000 has much more memory than MSOX3000T, but Keysight is simply better to use and not artificially constrained.
MSOX3000T has only one problem (actually 2, it has smaller screen than RTM3000) is short memory. So it is not good for very long captures.
Because of that, for long decodes and long captures in general, i got Picoscope with 500MS of memory and 15-16 decoders. Decoding such long stuff should be done on PC anyways. Our member Nico that uses RTM3000 to grab long captures actually saves decode to file and opens it on PC for detailed analysis. I simply grab and decode right there on a PC with Picoscope.
My life would be much simpler if RTM3000 had all the capability of Keysight 3000T series in a new, long memory modern large screen U/I concept. I wouldn't need two scopes then.

But it doesn't, and I didn't buy it because it didn't fit my purpose. Combo of MSOX3000T+3046D Picoscope did, so I have that. And it works very well.

But I wanted very wide range of capabilities. I get all kinds of eclectic projects that sometimes need all kinds of reverse engineering. So I try to have as much capability as I can.
It's also business. I buy tools that will make money. That is my reason (and excuse  >:D). For hobby, even Rigol DS1057Z or Micsig TO1104C go a long way.. very long way. And grab one of those cheap logic analyser thingies from China and you can decode for miles...

If you want very advanced scope for the money, that will get even better with time, and if you're willing to live with some quirks for now (like 888mdB instead of 0.88dB in FFT), Siglent SDS2000X+ is hard to beat, with caveats I mentioned, that might be resolved with time. Other option is GW Instek 2000E series. Rock solid and does everything (and much more ) that you mentioned. But is not fancy looking thing, screen is smaller, and U/I is old school (if I were to say what it reminds me to, I would say Tektronix MDO3000). If that fact that it a bit old fashioned doesn't bother you, that is one good instrument.

I'm disappointed in new Rigols (5000, 7000) because they have worse noise than older generation, lot of still unresolved issues, and lost chance to make better GUI. They are still good for digital stuff, high refresh rates, large memories etc. I wish if they could clean up the act and improve some shortcomings a bit.. It is a good thing to have freedom of choice.



 
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Offline switchabl

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2020, 12:14:02 pm »
For an all-day, general-purpose scope, it's not all about raw performance and features. Well, within reason. If you need the bandwidth, you need the bandwidth and if you need a specific feature a lot, you probably shouldn't buy one without it. But for most people and most tasks, a lot of scopes will do the job one way or another. So I mainly want one that is not annoying to use. In particular, one with a clear, well-designed UI, a nice screen, no (few) weird bugs and quirks, no noisy fan, no lag, doesn't take minutes to boot (*yes, I'm looking at you, old Windows-based scope*). At home, I currently make do with a DS1054Z (and an Analog Discovery for some more specialized stuff), which often kinda does the job (admirably so, considering the price), but it fails almost all these criteria. That is why the R&S RTB is high on my list for a potential replacement, and the new Rigols and the Instek are not.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2020, 12:16:46 pm by switchabl »
 

Offline Frank_MV

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Re: Question related RTB2000: I2C
« Reply #12 on: November 13, 2020, 12:24:16 pm »
Many thanks for your anwers  :-+
I will now consider exactly what I am going to do

Right, the boot time of 10 seconds of an RTB is already very good.

« Last Edit: November 13, 2020, 12:26:57 pm by Frank_MV »
 


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