Author Topic: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?  (Read 11730 times)

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Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #25 on: January 06, 2016, 12:32:30 am »
60$ wouldn't be bad for shipping.   What would the 16500B come with?   Anything at all or would I need to purchase all the accessories and modules for it myself?   Like the pods and stuff like that.

I found a HP 16702A W/ 16717A & 16701A and 4 X 16500 CABLES D28    for, after shipping and everything, it comes to 404$.   It's more, but I made an offer and the guy counter-offered.   It comes with everything in the photos.

When I sold the 16500B locally I threw in a used set of breakout leads and grabbers with it so it was ready to go. If you have to buy those separately from the analyzer they can add up.  If you buy an HP / Agilent analyzer without the breakout leads and grabbers the best bet might be to buy a complete new/unused 16715-68702 accessory set which includes a set of POD1, POD2, POD3, POD4 breakout lead set, 80 grabbers, ground leads, and some spares, for around $70 or so if you can. Also known as a 16555-68702 accessory set. If you buy the bits and pieces separately it will usually add up more.

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Personal opinion on the 16700 series is that I wouldn't pay a premium for a 16702 over a 16700 unless I really needed a portable self contained system and didn't want to move an external monitor around or have space to set one up.

The built in 16702 LCD display is only 800x600 while you can use 1024x768 or 1280x1024 on an external LCD display. Also, if it has Option 3 installed (look for the OPT# 003 sticker on the back) you can go up to 1600x1200 although most LCD displays won't sync to that display mode. Plus the built in LCD display (and touch screen on the 16702B) is just one more thing that can eventually fail or get damaged during shipping.

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Unless you need one right away to work on a project right now there shouldn't be a need to rush while you're still asking for opinions. Other people might want to chime in with other helpful opinions and it's not like the supply of these analyzers is going to go dry anytime soon and drive prices up.

Thank you.  From what I've read, the Option 003 for the 16702A just upgrades the RAM to 256MB, right?   Can I purchase the memory separately and manually upgrade it if Option 003 isn't installed when I purchase the product?   Or is that something HP / Agilent would have to do at their factory?
 

Offline gslick

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2016, 01:34:20 am »
Thank you.  From what I've read, the Option 003 for the 16702A just upgrades the RAM to 256MB, right?   Can I purchase the memory separately and manually upgrade it if Option 003 isn't installed when I purchase the product?   Or is that something HP / Agilent would have to do at their factory?

Option 003 increases system memory from 64M to 160MB on most 16700A and 16702A and from 128MB to 256MB on a 16700B and 16702B.

Most 16700A and 16702A have 32MB on the CPU board and add another 32MB on a daughter board in the standard configuration or add 128MB on a daughter board in the Option 003 configuration. Some late version 16700A and 16702A have 128MB on the CPU board and either no daughter board or add 128MB on a daughter board in the Option 003 configuration.

The 16700B and 16702B have 128MB on the CPU board and no daughter board in the standard configuration or add 128MB on a daughter board in the Option 003 configuration.

On all four models Option 003 also adds 2MB of video memory on a daughter board in addition to the standard 2MB of video memory on the CPU board. There are two OKI 54V25632A-10A parts on the CPU board and two Micron MT41LC256K32D4 SGRAM parts on the daughter board in the systems I have looked at.

If you have a 16700 series mainframe without Option 003 installed you can easily install it yourself but only if you can find someone selling the daughter boards or scavenge them from a 16700 or 16600 series parts unit. These aren't off the shelf boards you could find anywhere else.

If you're curious here are some images of different versions of 16700 series boards showing the main boards and daughter boards. The 16600 series share the same CPU board but populated in a slightly different configuration.

16700A Logic Analyzer Circuit Boards (Two Fan Version)
https://goo.gl/photos/v9XK2Grc1aCaHGS3A

16700A Logic Analyzer Circuit Boards (Three Fan Version)
https://goo.gl/photos/ZTDG9VgBvrvJocaQA

16700B Logic Analyzer Circuit Boards
https://goo.gl/photos/JLTTGy6yDPngDKqF6
 

Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2016, 02:05:07 am »
Thanks for the pictures and excellent explanation!    I ended up going for the HP 16702B with the Option 003 add-on.   It comes with the 16771A 48-Channel Pattern Generator Module and the 16740A 48-Channel Pattern Generator Module.    It needs some work.   It needs three filler panels (from what I can see), part number 16500-40502.   It comes with some cables but the cables don't have those little wires coming off of the PODS like this item has ( http://www.ebay.com/itm/252235169646?ru=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fsch%2Fi.html%3F_from%3DR40%26_sacat%3D0%26_nkw%3D252235169646%26_rdc%3D1 )   so I'm going to try and purchase some of them and maybe some grabbers I think they're called.   I'm debating on whether I should try to purchase the PODS and grabbers separately or if I should just purchase that accessory kit you mentioned earlier.

This is the one I got!   http://www.ebay.com/itm/172031834984?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

I can barely wait for it to come!   I want to upgrade it.   I want to replace the fans inside with quieter running ones and I want to replace the hard drive with a larger sized SCSI one.   I saw a post on someone who managed to do that and it quieted it down quite a bit and sped up the boot-up time by 15 seconds.   He put something much larger inside, 146GB SCA Ultra320 SCSI drive.  I plan on connecting to this unit using a remote X session if I can.   That was the determining factor.  I figured 100Mb ethernet would be really nice for that.

THANK YOU FOR ALL THE HELP GUYS!!!!!   Much appreciated!!!!
 

Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2016, 03:03:59 am »
Hey Gslick, I found your google drive links in another forum here on EEVBlog for the OS ISOs for the 16702B!   Thank you so much!   I'm downloading the latest I believe, 2.90.00.   Are there any BIOS updates I should try and find as well?   Thanks!
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 03:08:48 am by Spork Schivago »
 

Offline gslick

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2016, 05:00:15 am »
Hey Gslick, I found your google drive links in another forum here on EEVBlog for the OS ISOs for the 16702B!   Thank you so much!   I'm downloading the latest I believe, 2.90.00.   Are there any BIOS updates I should try and find as well?   Thanks!

Version A.02.90 was the last version of the software that I saw for the 16700 series before support was discontinued.  Some of the 16700 series I have have different firmware versions. Without going back and taking a look I'm not sure if that is only between A models and B models, or if some A models have different versions than other A models. I have never seen any tools or firmware images for updating the firmware in the field, or any release notes mentioning firmware updates.

In the item listing title for this one the modules are correctly described as 16717A and 16740A State/Timing Modules:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/172031834984
In the item description the 48-Channel Pattern Generator Module reference is incorrect, that would be for a 16522A Module. The 16717A and 16740A are nice for your first real logic analyzer. The 16717A is faster and deeper sample depth than the 16740A. One advantage of the 16740A though is that it is the minimum module that is still supported by the 16900 series if you ever picked up one of those some day if they become more common and cheaper.

Hope it arrives in good working condition. The pictures show it with the POD 1-4 cables for each module so you just need some of the breakout lead sets and grabbers.

With the built in CD-ROM drive all you need to do to reinstall the software from scratch is hook up a PS/2 keyboard and hit a key to stop the autoboot sequence when you first power on the system, then tell it to "boot alt" at the firmware prompt and it should try to boot from the CD-ROM and begin the software install sequence and automatically run to completion.

First you might want to do "co ti" (configuration time) to check the time, and if it is something like 1970 due to a dead battery then do "co ti 20:16:01:06:04:51" for example where that is the current year:month:day:hour:minute in GMT so that the time is correct before it begins the software installation.

Good luck with it. Should be fun.
 

Online nctnico

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #30 on: January 06, 2016, 11:21:31 am »
I'm going to be a fanboy here but I don't see the value of the HP logic analysers. They use a proprietary OS on a proprietary platform. The TLA700 series uses a Windows based PC platform. A big advantage of that is that everything is much more accessible and hardware is easy to upgrade (except for the motherboard). Also the TLA700 series allows remote control over the network so you can run the software on a PC with big monitors; no more peeking through an 800x600 or 1024x768 peep-hole sized screen. Actually the Tektronix TLA7016 mainframe based logic analyser doesn't even have a PC inside it. There is an ethernet to VXI bridge module in it to connect the backplane to the network and thats it.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 11:26:09 am by nctnico »
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Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2016, 11:58:33 am »
Hey Gslick, I found your google drive links in another forum here on EEVBlog for the OS ISOs for the 16702B!   Thank you so much!   I'm downloading the latest I believe, 2.90.00.   Are there any BIOS updates I should try and find as well?   Thanks!

Version A.02.90 was the last version of the software that I saw for the 16700 series before support was discontinued.  Some of the 16700 series I have have different firmware versions. Without going back and taking a look I'm not sure if that is only between A models and B models, or if some A models have different versions than other A models. I have never seen any tools or firmware images for updating the firmware in the field, or any release notes mentioning firmware updates.

In the item listing title for this one the modules are correctly described as 16717A and 16740A State/Timing Modules:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/172031834984
In the item description the 48-Channel Pattern Generator Module reference is incorrect, that would be for a 16522A Module. The 16717A and 16740A are nice for your first real logic analyzer. The 16717A is faster and deeper sample depth than the 16740A. One advantage of the 16740A though is that it is the minimum module that is still supported by the 16900 series if you ever picked up one of those some day if they become more common and cheaper.

Hope it arrives in good working condition. The pictures show it with the POD 1-4 cables for each module so you just need some of the breakout lead sets and grabbers.

With the built in CD-ROM drive all you need to do to reinstall the software from scratch is hook up a PS/2 keyboard and hit a key to stop the autoboot sequence when you first power on the system, then tell it to "boot alt" at the firmware prompt and it should try to boot from the CD-ROM and begin the software install sequence and automatically run to completion.

First you might want to do "co ti" (configuration time) to check the time, and if it is something like 1970 due to a dead battery then do "co ti 20:16:01:06:04:51" for example where that is the current year:month:day:hour:minute in GMT so that the time is correct before it begins the software installation.

Good luck with it. Should be fun.

Thanks!  It's going to be awesomely fun, I'm sure!   So those breakout lead sets and grabbers...that'd be these, right?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/111863055111?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

If so, is that a good price to pay for them?   I thought they should have been called timing modules or something and questioned the pattern generator description but not too much because that's how they had them listed.   So what exactly is a pattern generator then?   I've seen a few listed on e-Bay now that I know the modules I have are not them...  Thanks!
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 12:40:46 pm by Spork Schivago »
 

Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #32 on: January 06, 2016, 12:04:23 pm »
I'm going to be a fanboy here but I don't see the value of the HP logic analysers. They use a proprietary OS on a proprietary platform. The TLA700 series uses a Windows based PC platform. A big advantage of that is that everything is much more accessible and hardware is easy to upgrade (except for the motherboard). Also the TLA700 series allows remote control over the network so you can run the software on a PC with big monitors; no more peeking through an 800x600 or 1024x768 peep-hole sized screen. Actually the Tektronix TLA7016 mainframe based logic analyser doesn't even have a PC inside it. There is an ethernet to VXI bridge module in it to connect the backplane to the network and thats it.

Thanks for the input.   My HP 16702B will allow remote control over the network as well though so I won't need to view it on a tiny screen, if I'm not mistaken, right?   Just gotta configure it for a remote X-Session.  Unless when they say it's running X-Windows, I'm thinking of something totally different.    I know I personally feel a lot more comfortable in Linux than I do Microsoft Windows.   I've only touched Unix once in my life when I was a very young teenager (maybe 13 or 14?).   I'd imagine the HPUX would be a lot like Linux.   Just HPs version.   I've heard of it throughout the years but I've never been able to play with it.    Maybe when it eventually comes time to purchase another one, I'll look into the Tektronix TLA700 series a bit more.
 

Offline MarkL

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #33 on: January 06, 2016, 12:24:08 pm »
I'm going to be a fanboy here but I don't see the value of the HP logic analysers. They use a proprietary OS on a proprietary platform. The TLA700 series uses a Windows based PC platform.

Since when is Windows non-proprietary?

Windows is the one big reason to avoid the TLA series, and also the Agilent/HP 16800 and 16900 series, in my opinion.
 

Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #34 on: January 06, 2016, 12:38:29 pm »
I'm going to be a fanboy here but I don't see the value of the HP logic analysers. They use a proprietary OS on a proprietary platform. The TLA700 series uses a Windows based PC platform.

Since when is Windows non-proprietary?

Windows is the one big reason to avoid the TLA series, and also the Agilent/HP 16800 and 16900 series, in my opinion.
It's so early in the morning here (and I'm not a morning person!) I totally missed the proprietary statement.   I think though, it's just different people feel more comfortable with different operating systems.    Maybe nctnico feels a lot more comfortable with Microsoft Windows and you and me just feel a lot more comfortable with the *nix type operating systems.   I know my wife, she's all about Microsoft Windows for some reason.   Just can't seem to get her to make the switch.   I do use her laptop a lot though.   It's running Windows 10.   Just out of curiosity though, has anyone ever tried to make like an open source OS for these Logic Analyzers?   Wouldn't we just need to figure out what CPU they're running and either look for a version of Linux that'll run on it or maybe make a version ourselves?   Or isn't that an option?
 

Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #35 on: January 06, 2016, 12:44:04 pm »
Is a pattern generator just what it sounds like?   Like if I wanted to generate a square wave on my Logic Analyzer's channels, I could use a pattern generator and it'd output the square wave on whatever channels I set it to?  So I could do stuff like PWM and maybe simulate button presses or oscillation or something cool like that?
 

Online nctnico

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #36 on: January 06, 2016, 01:51:05 pm »
I'm going to be a fanboy here but I don't see the value of the HP logic analysers. They use a proprietary OS on a proprietary platform. The TLA700 series uses a Windows based PC platform.

Since when is Windows non-proprietary?

Windows is the one big reason to avoid the TLA series, and also the Agilent/HP 16800 and 16900 series, in my opinion.
Now you are being irrational. For the TLA700 series you can write your own protocol decoder plugins if you want. You can also use the software offline which works faster and more convenient than on the analyser itself. Sure you can use X-Windows remotely on the HP machines but the software still runs inside the logic analyser box on an ancient & slow CPU. Recently I had a customer who wanted to do more analysis on the data captured. With the TLA700 series that is easy: they can download the software for free and load the captured data without needing the physical logic analyser at all. I'm not a fan of Windows but at some point one proprietary system is just more limited than the other.

@Spork Schivago: a pattern generator has seperate output channels. You have to realise that creating patterns is extremely tedious without powerful software to create standard patterns like I2C and SPI transfers.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 02:30:08 pm by nctnico »
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Offline BloodyCactus

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #37 on: January 06, 2016, 03:11:16 pm »
My HP 16702B will allow remote control over the network as well though so I won't need to view it on a tiny screen, if I'm not mistaken, right?   Just gotta configure it for a remote X-Session.  Unless when they say it's running X-Windows, I'm thinking of something totally different. 

I dont know about the 16702B, but Xwindows on my 1670G only put up a window locally the same size as it was on the machine itself, small square window on my desktop. scaling was pretty poor, i mean fully readable and nice, but it was not bigger, and navigating on it was still a pain even with keyboard and mouse (it has some weird keybinding mappings).

still very usable but getting such ancient X to play nice with modern Ubuntu X11 was interesting :/
-- Aussie living in the USA --
 

Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #38 on: January 06, 2016, 03:58:21 pm »
I'm going to be a fanboy here but I don't see the value of the HP logic analysers. They use a proprietary OS on a proprietary platform. The TLA700 series uses a Windows based PC platform.

Since when is Windows non-proprietary?

Windows is the one big reason to avoid the TLA series, and also the Agilent/HP 16800 and 16900 series, in my opinion.
Now you are being irrational. For the TLA700 series you can write your own protocol decoder plugins if you want. You can also use the software offline which works faster and more convenient than on the analyser itself. Sure you can use X-Windows remotely on the HP machines but the software still runs inside the logic analyser box on an ancient & slow CPU. Recently I had a customer who wanted to do more analysis on the data captured. With the TLA700 series that is easy: they can download the software for free and load the captured data without needing the physical logic analyser at all. I'm not a fan of Windows but at some point one proprietary system is just more limited than the other.

@Spork Schivago: a pattern generator has seperate output channels. You have to realise that creating patterns is extremely tedious without powerful software to create standard patterns like I2C and SPI transfers.

Oooh, writing plugins for a protocol decoder would be a great feature!   The one thing I don't really like about my 16702B is if there's a protocol I want to decode and it isn't supported, I don't think there's much I can do.   I know I can have root access to the HP 16702B so maybe I could find away to write my own decoders or something.   I see they have a module that will let me decode SATA 1.5Gbs stuff though.   So I'm guessing to support different protocols, I'd need a module perhaps?   Anyway, I snagged up an HP 16534A module which is a 2 GSa/s 2-Channel 500 MHz bandwidth digitizing oscilloscope module.    They seem to be crazy expensive but I found one where the guy says the triggering doesn't work so he was selling it for 150$ + 20$.   I made an offer, he countered and I got it for 115$ + 15$ or so shipping.   Total, around 127$ and some change!    I also got the service manual for it but I'm hoping something as simple as calibrating the triggering could fix the problem.   Hopefully it wasn't a waste of money.

Thanks for the information on the pattern generators.   I noticed after I posted that they had their own output channels.   I can't see where I'd need a pattern generator right now.   I was just curious as to what they were I guess.
 

Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #39 on: January 06, 2016, 04:00:34 pm »
My HP 16702B will allow remote control over the network as well though so I won't need to view it on a tiny screen, if I'm not mistaken, right?   Just gotta configure it for a remote X-Session.  Unless when they say it's running X-Windows, I'm thinking of something totally different. 

I dont know about the 16702B, but Xwindows on my 1670G only put up a window locally the same size as it was on the machine itself, small square window on my desktop. scaling was pretty poor, i mean fully readable and nice, but it was not bigger, and navigating on it was still a pain even with keyboard and mouse (it has some weird keybinding mappings).

still very usable but getting such ancient X to play nice with modern Ubuntu X11 was interesting :/

Thank you for the heads up!   I found a website where a guy explains his endeavours with his HP 16702B.   Maybe the option 3 has something to do with the remote session?  From reading the comments at the end here: http://tech.mattmillman.com/16702b/  it seems a user was able to use his monitor with an HP 16700A and get 1920x1080 on his monitor using a remote X session.   So I don't think this will be a problem with the 16702B.   Perhaps it's the client you was using that wouldn't let you set the window physically bigger?   Or perhaps it's just the way they designed the X-Windows system for your 1670G.   Maybe check to see if you're running the latest OS on there and if not, see if an update would fix the problem?
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 04:43:21 pm by Spork Schivago »
 

Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #40 on: January 06, 2016, 04:01:50 pm »
So do you guys know if I can use these for my breakout leads?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/111863055111?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

I know it's a bit expensive but I'd like to grab them if I could so I can actually use my unit when it comes.   I really appreciate all the help and advice people have given me.
 

Offline gslick

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #41 on: January 06, 2016, 06:00:42 pm »
So do you guys know if I can use these for my breakout leads?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/111863055111?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

I know it's a bit expensive but I'd like to grab them if I could so I can actually use my unit when it comes.   I really appreciate all the help and advice people have given me.

As any eBay buyer I would be more comfortable myself going with a listing showing a new / sealed 16715-68702 kit than a listing with some random images.

For example this listing asking around the same $100 shipped, open to best offer:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/360857524226
I think I've bought an item or two from the seller fourgt - Global Test Equipment in the past with good results.

Just my opinion.
 

Offline gslick

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #42 on: January 06, 2016, 06:22:17 pm »
Just out of curiosity though, has anyone ever tried to make like an open source OS for these Logic Analyzers?   Wouldn't we just need to figure out what CPU they're running and either look for a version of Linux that'll run on it or maybe make a version ourselves?   Or isn't that an option?

The 16600/16700 series use a 150MHz PA-7300 CPU running standard HP-UX 10.20 and a custom application on top.

You might be able to get PA-RISC Linux to boot on one, but I imagine it would then be a huge reverse engineering effort to figure out how to talk through to the bridge to the analyzer modules, and then talk to the various flavors of modules. I doubt anyone would be successful in getting that all to work without internal design documentation and major motivation to do so, but you never know...
 

Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #43 on: January 06, 2016, 06:48:58 pm »
Just out of curiosity though, has anyone ever tried to make like an open source OS for these Logic Analyzers?   Wouldn't we just need to figure out what CPU they're running and either look for a version of Linux that'll run on it or maybe make a version ourselves?   Or isn't that an option?

The 16600/16700 series use a 150MHz PA-7300 CPU running standard HP-UX 10.20 and a custom application on top.

You might be able to get PA-RISC Linux to boot on one, but I imagine it would then be a huge reverse engineering effort to figure out how to talk through to the bridge to the analyzer modules, and then talk to the various flavors of modules. I doubt anyone would be successful in getting that all to work without internal design documentation and major motivation to do so, but you never know...

Thanks.   I found a forum on Keysight's website were a guy was trying to find the reinstallation discs.   A gentleman provided him a link to the ftp.keysight.com server but they user couldn't get the disc to boot.  Last post he made was back in October of 2015.  I responded and said I believed the ISO was missing some stuff and referenced EEVBlog and how you (without using names) made a copy of the original discs from HP.   I said you also were very thorough in figuring out what was wrong with their ISO and offered them a copy to put on their FTP site if they wanted.   I hope you don't mind me doing this.   If they decide they want to, if you want, I can credit you for your work.   If you'd like to remain anonymous, I can do that as well.   The guy that pointed the user to the link actually worked on developing the Credit Card Demo Board or whatever it was called for the HP 16700 series!    I said something along the lines of, "Since the 16702B is considered Obsolete, would Keysight be willing to release any of the source code for the unit?   I'd love to update some of the stuff in there".   I doubt they will, but who knows.   Other companies have done so in the past with obsolete stuff.   I remember when the developers released the source code to Descent 1 way back in the day.
 

Offline sreeb

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #44 on: January 15, 2016, 06:00:37 am »
So do you guys know if I can use these for my breakout leads?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/111863055111?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

I know it's a bit expensive but I'd like to grab them if I could so I can actually use my unit when it comes.   I really appreciate all the help and advice people have given me.

As any eBay buyer I would be more comfortable myself going with a listing showing a new / sealed 16715-68702 kit than a listing with some random images.

For example this listing asking around the same $100 shipped, open to best offer:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/360857524226
I think I've bought an item or two from the seller fourgt - Global Test Equipment in the past with good results.

Just my opinion.

This thread inspired me to buy a 16700a without too much thought to the lead cost.  Now that I look more closely and see that I need 5 sets @ $100 each to fully populate my analyzer, they look pretty expensive.

Now if I could only get the covers off.  The back feet require a torx key and I only have torx bits that I can't fit through the well in the feet....
 

Offline gslick

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #45 on: January 15, 2016, 11:58:25 pm »
Now if I could only get the covers off.  The back feet require a torx key and I only have torx bits that I can't fit through the well in the feet....

My go-to tool for working on these is an Eklind T-10 model 68610 T-Handle TORX wrench. There must lots of different brands of these that would work equally well. I use this one because I bought something like a dozen of them together cheap several years ago. I like the weight of the T-Handle to give it some momentum when you spin it, and extra leverage if you have a stubborn screw.

Too bad you might pay more to ship one than for the tool itself.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/390024443284
 

Offline sreeb

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #46 on: January 17, 2016, 07:40:16 am »
Now if I could only get the covers off.  The back feet require a torx key and I only have torx bits that I can't fit through the well in the feet....

My go-to tool for working on these is an Eklind T-10 model 68610 T-Handle TORX wrench. There must lots of different brands of these that would work equally well. I use this one because I bought something like a dozen of them together cheap several years ago. I like the weight of the T-Handle to give it some momentum when you spin it, and extra leverage if you have a stubborn screw.

Too bad you might pay more to ship one than for the tool itself.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/390024443284

I bought a set of Tekton L style torx wrenches off Amazon.  These got me in.  My power supply is completely dead though.


 

Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #47 on: January 17, 2016, 06:14:26 pm »
So do you guys know if I can use these for my breakout leads?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/111863055111?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

I know it's a bit expensive but I'd like to grab them if I could so I can actually use my unit when it comes.   I really appreciate all the help and advice people have given me.

As any eBay buyer I would be more comfortable myself going with a listing showing a new / sealed 16715-68702 kit than a listing with some random images.

For example this listing asking around the same $100 shipped, open to best offer:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/360857524226
I think I've bought an item or two from the seller fourgt - Global Test Equipment in the past with good results.

Just my opinion.

This thread inspired me to buy a 16700a without too much thought to the lead cost.  Now that I look more closely and see that I need 5 sets @ $100 each to fully populate my analyzer, they look pretty expensive.

Now if I could only get the covers off.  The back feet require a torx key and I only have torx bits that I can't fit through the well in the feet....

Just curious, but why do you need 5 sets?   I figured I'd only be using one of the modules at a time.   If I need the other one, I'll just switch out the four connector things with all the little wires on it and stuff to the other module.
 

Offline sreeb

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #48 on: January 18, 2016, 02:03:52 am »
So do you guys know if I can use these for my breakout leads?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/111863055111?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

I know it's a bit expensive but I'd like to grab them if I could so I can actually use my unit when it comes.   I really appreciate all the help and advice people have given me.

As any eBay buyer I would be more comfortable myself going with a listing showing a new / sealed 16715-68702 kit than a listing with some random images.

For example this listing asking around the same $100 shipped, open to best offer:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/360857524226
I think I've bought an item or two from the seller fourgt - Global Test Equipment in the past with good results.

Just my opinion.

This thread inspired me to buy a 16700a without too much thought to the lead cost.  Now that I look more closely and see that I need 5 sets @ $100 each to fully populate my analyzer, they look pretty expensive.

Now if I could only get the covers off.  The back feet require a torx key and I only have torx bits that I can't fit through the well in the feet....

Just curious, but why do you need 5 sets?   I figured I'd only be using one of the modules at a time.   If I need the other one, I'll just switch out the four connector things with all the little wires on it and stuff to the other module.

Mine is configured with 3 16717a modules (68 channels * 3= 204) and 1 16550a module (102 channels) 306 total.

This is a bigger configuration than I ever used when parallel logic analyzers were in their heyday.  If your system has  64 bit wide parallel buses, you can go through channels very fast.  There is a reason there was an expansion chassis since five modules really isn't enough for some applications.  Of course, if you really need to connect 306 channels, hopefully you placed mictor connectors on the board so you aren't using lead sets and grabbers.  These days, serial interconnect is common so there is less need for lots of channels.

Back in the day, a logic analyzer like this cost real money so it was common to have extra lead sets so you could temporarily move the logic analyzer to another task without needing to spend an hour reconnecting and debugging your lead sets.

I probably won't get lead sets for the 16550a since it isn't that good a module and I don't have an immediate need.  That still leaves the other 3 modules which are pretty decent.  I don't need all three today but I'm concerned they may be harder to come by later.
 

 
 

Offline Spork Schivago

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Re: Is a Agilent 1673G 34 CH Port Logic Analyzer a good buy?
« Reply #49 on: January 18, 2016, 04:23:08 am »
So do you guys know if I can use these for my breakout leads?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/111863055111?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

I know it's a bit expensive but I'd like to grab them if I could so I can actually use my unit when it comes.   I really appreciate all the help and advice people have given me.

As any eBay buyer I would be more comfortable myself going with a listing showing a new / sealed 16715-68702 kit than a listing with some random images.

For example this listing asking around the same $100 shipped, open to best offer:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/360857524226
I think I've bought an item or two from the seller fourgt - Global Test Equipment in the past with good results.

Just my opinion.

This thread inspired me to buy a 16700a without too much thought to the lead cost.  Now that I look more closely and see that I need 5 sets @ $100 each to fully populate my analyzer, they look pretty expensive.

Now if I could only get the covers off.  The back feet require a torx key and I only have torx bits that I can't fit through the well in the feet....

Just curious, but why do you need 5 sets?   I figured I'd only be using one of the modules at a time.   If I need the other one, I'll just switch out the four connector things with all the little wires on it and stuff to the other module.

Mine is configured with 3 16717a modules (68 channels * 3= 204) and 1 16550a module (102 channels) 306 total.

This is a bigger configuration than I ever used when parallel logic analyzers were in their heyday.  If your system has  64 bit wide parallel buses, you can go through channels very fast.  There is a reason there was an expansion chassis since five modules really isn't enough for some applications.  Of course, if you really need to connect 306 channels, hopefully you placed mictor connectors on the board so you aren't using lead sets and grabbers.  These days, serial interconnect is common so there is less need for lots of channels.

Back in the day, a logic analyzer like this cost real money so it was common to have extra lead sets so you could temporarily move the logic analyzer to another task without needing to spend an hour reconnecting and debugging your lead sets.

I probably won't get lead sets for the 16550a since it isn't that good a module and I don't have an immediate need.  That still leaves the other 3 modules which are pretty decent.  I don't need all three today but I'm concerned they may be harder to come by later.

Wow, thank you for the response!   That's really cool.   I couldn't imagine having a need for 306 channels all hooked up at once!   That's insane!   It definitely put a smile on my face though, reading your post.   If I see any for a cheap price, I'll send ya a PM!
 


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