Author Topic: Error when buying UNI-T UT139C and I'm thinking of buying FLUKE for electronic  (Read 2379 times)

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Offline Archeus

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Hi there!

I recently purchased a UNI-T UT139C multimeter, since I thought it was complete for both electronics and home use. There are characteristics that do not convince me as it is the bandwidth of only 1KHz and a regular accuracy.

I have also noticed later on models like UT61E have more accounts and is more suitable for the electronic as I have read. However instead of buying the model UT61E, but I have decided to take the leap and buy a more quality FLUKE multimeter for a use mainly in electronic.

I would like to ask for advice on a model that, if possible, served me for life.

Thanks.
 

Online ataradov

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UT139C is a good meter. I'm not  sure what bandwidth you are talking about, it is a multimeter, it is not meant for any sort of high frequency use.

And for the price of Fluke you can buy 10 UT139Cs, so they don't need to last you a lifetime :)

Fluke 87V is a default chose from a Fluke model range. The rest depends on what you actually want from a meter.

Also, if you don't have moral problems with that, you can get Fluke 15B /17B from China much cheaper than a European/US version.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2017, 12:25:24 am by ataradov »
Alex
 
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Offline Archeus

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Thank you ataradov.  :)

I think I'm going to decide to buy the model Fluke 87V  :-+, since it is a popular model, has good precision and lifetime warranty. But I still have some doubts about whether there are more models that are more optimal for electronics or that are similar to the model 87V.

I have also read the following guides before posting this post:

Http://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/multimester-spreadsheet/
Http://www.fluke.com/fluke/eses/products/DMMSelect.htm
 

Online joeqsmith

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Strange you would buy what is popular rather than what you need. 

Personally, I would never buy the 87V because of it's limited features.   I would go for the 289 instead and would own one today if they offered an updated version of it that booted faster, had better battery life, had faster graphing, color display ..... Starting to sound like the UNI-T 181A.  Too bad that meter's front end it so sensitive. 


How electrically robust is your meter?? https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsK99WXk9VhcghnAauTBsbg
 

Offline Lightages

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A Fluke 87V is not a bad decision. It is an industry standard for many good reasons. It is reliable, has many good features including its warranty, and is built to last. Is it the best buy? No always.

There are other meters to consider from other manufacturers. Although Keysight has has some issues with the U1272A, they have been very good at fixing the problem and everyone seems to be satisfied. You might want to consider something from Keysight. Amprobe has their AM-160 which is much less expensive than the 87V and offers some things that people might prefer over the 87V. Have a loom at the Extech MM series (NOT THE EX SERIES!). Hioki offers some really good meters that offer more features than the 87V. Yokogawa s another to look at. Of course I am also going to suggest a Brymen. The top of the line BM869S is preferred by some over the 87V at much less money.

IMHO, the BM525S with the PC connection kit is what most people would be happy with as a handheld meter for almost anything electronic and electrical. It seems to be overlooked for some reason. You can get a BM525S with the PC connection kit at much less than an 87V.

These are just my suggestions at other to look at.
 

Offline rodolfok

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Have a loom at the Extech MM series (NOT THE EX SERIES!).

What's wrong with the EX series? The EX330 is a model suggested by Dave in one of his videos on EEVBlog.
I am evaluating my next DMM and have shortlisted UNI-T UT139C, Extech EX330, Trotec BE50 (a German brand), Bside ADM20 or Mastech MS8250C (this is a bit out of budget).
 

Offline Fungus

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Hi there!

I recently purchased a UNI-T UT139C multimeter, since I thought it was complete for both electronics and home use. There are characteristics that do not convince me as it is the bandwidth of only 1KHz and a regular accuracy.

I have also noticed later on models like UT61E have more accounts and is more suitable for the electronic as I have read. However instead of buying the model UT61E, but I have decided to take the leap and buy a more quality FLUKE multimeter for a use mainly in electronic.

Why do you need more accuracy/counts? What do you measure?

The meter I use most for my hobby work cost me less than $20. I really don't need a Fluke 87V.

 

Online joeqsmith

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One year later you chime in?  :-DD 
How electrically robust is your meter?? https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsK99WXk9VhcghnAauTBsbg
 

Offline HalFET

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I can only speak well about the Fluke 17b+, if you want an affordable meter. The 87V isn't really an electronics bench meter though, check their catalogue for what fits your needs instead! The 87V is meant for industrial use really, that's why it's so tough though.
 

Offline retiredcaps

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What's wrong with the EX series?
Some of the EX series are made by CEM Instruments which have variable build quality.  Dave's $99 shootout shows what you might expect.

 


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