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Siglent SDS2000X Plus

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maxspb69:
Having made a logic probe for the SDS2000 (Big thanks to oz2cpu), I was surprised to not find such an important item  as setting the trigger hysteresis in the digital channels menu. Without the possibility of triggering hysteresis, the edges of the pulses have random jitter and phantom spurs even at low frequency signals. As a result, time measurements become meaningless when using a logic analyzer. And how did the Siglent's engineers  miss such an important point?

tautech:

--- Quote from: maxspb69 on November 27, 2021, 07:00:35 pm ---Having made a logic probe for the SDS2000 (Big thanks to oz2cpu), I was surprised to not find such an important item  as setting the trigger hysteresis in the digital channels menu. Without the possibility of triggering hysteresis, the edges of the pulses have random jitter and phantom spurs even at low frequency signals. As a result, time measurements become meaningless when using a logic analyzer. And how did the Siglent's engineers  miss such an important point?

--- End quote ---
Your answer is on this page. Study all later posts carefully:
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/diy-logic-analyzer-probe-and-pods-for-siglent-scopes/msg3509216/#msg3509216

maxspb69:
Thanks tautech, I didn't even know about this topic!

bson:

--- Quote from: Peter_O on November 23, 2021, 10:33:19 am ---Seems that music perception is more complex than the added abilities to recognize certain sinus frequencies with conscious hearing.

--- End quote ---
Here's an experiment.  If you have a function gen, connect a set of headphones to it.  Set the output to a low voltage, like 0.1V rms and 1kHz.  Turn up the amplitude until you reach normal listening volume.  Then turn up the frequency to where you can't hear it anymore, for me that's 12-13kHz depending on ear.  Then turn it up a little further, another 2kHz.  Finally turn up the amplitude; at some point while you can't hear the tone you can feel it.  Like you feel its presence, or a pressure on your head/ears.  Don't go further to avoid hearing damage.

I'm pretty sure the same thing happens with music as well - a subtle element of this feeling of presence, modulated to the music, makes it more realistic.

thinkfat:
I'm sure your brain will be happy to fill in the tones that it knows to usually go with that particular sensation, even if the ears have grown numb to them.

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