Products > Test Equipment

Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread

<< < (20991/21567) > >>

beanflying:
There is about 1 second of TEA with the scope getting used as a Nuke detector.

Bit dumb I have all the Bond's on file but I am watching the free to air complete with adds  :o Tomorrow Night Thunderball....

mnementh:

--- Quote from: Ice-Tea on October 18, 2021, 08:47:38 am ---
Huh?  :wtf:

Opened up an original Fluke battery pack. Crusty as you might expect but... what's that?? Some yellow modling came off, looks suspiciously like a PTC resetable fuse. Might be part of the puzzle.
--- End quote ---
Hey... a Polyfuse buried in the cell pack. Who'd have thunk it...? ;)

Doing it this way serves three purposes:

One, it acts as a regular fuse in cases of short-circuit, albeit a pretty slow one.

Two, it somewhat acts as a thermal fuse; if the pack gets hot for any reason, tho usually from overcharging (or over discharging, in case of a circuit fault in the unit), the resistance of the Polyfuse increases, dropping charge/discharge current.

Three, it acts as OCP, both in charge and discharge modes. As charge or discharge current approaches its setpoint, it increases resistance, decreasing current flow to protect the unit and, in your case I'd suspect, the charging circuit.

Bet you a buck your aftermarket packs either omitted the Polyfuse, or substituted one of the wrong value or a cheap one that didn't work as it should.

I suggest having a talk with your supplier on those, but not until you've had a chance to do some forensic work on one of their packs that fried your expensive scopemeter.  :-+

mnem
:-BROKE

syau:

--- Quote from: mnementh on October 18, 2021, 01:12:40 pm ---
--- Quote from: Ice-Tea on October 18, 2021, 08:47:38 am ---
Huh?  :wtf:

Opened up an original Fluke battery pack. Crusty as you might expect but... what's that?? Some yellow modling came off, looks suspiciously like a PTC resetable fuse. Might be part of the puzzle.
--- End quote ---
Hey... a Polyfuse buried in the cell pack. Who'd have thunk it...? ;)

Doing it this way serves three purposes:

One, it acts as a regular fuse in cases of short-circuit, albeit a pretty slow one.

Two, it somewhat acts as a thermal fuse; if the pack gets hot for any reason, tho usually from overcharging (or over discharging, in case of a circuit fault in the unit), the resistance of the Polyfuse increases, dropping charge/discharge current.

Three, it acts as OCP, both in charge and discharge modes. As charge or discharge current approaches its setpoint, it increases resistance, decreasing current flow to protect the unit and, in your case I'd suspect, the charging circuit.

Bet you a buck your aftermarket packs either omitted the Polyfuse, or substituted one of the wrong value or a cheap one that didn't work as it should.

I suggest having a talk with your supplier on those, but not until you've had a chance to do some forensic work on one of their packs that fried your expensive scopemeter.  :-+

mnem
:-BROKE

--- End quote ---

AFAIK, those R&S FSH3/6 Portable Spectrum Analysis use the same type of battery pack.

mnementh:

--- Quote from: Robert763 on October 18, 2021, 08:08:59 am ---
--- Quote from: mnementh on October 17, 2021, 09:17:05 pm ---

Stumbled across this randomly. Guy's a hoot. Don't expect too much, just hang loose and have a laugh.

mnem
 :popcorn:

--- End quote ---

Not totally off the wall. In the WWII era there was a boat system that used the exhaust gas from a radial engine (mounted with shaft vertical) to drive turbines driving the propeller. IIRC correctly similar systems were at lest experimented with in tanks. It's a variation of the turbo-compound engine.
--- End quote ---
Well, no, I wasn't talking aboot the content; that was what got me interested. It was just the whole thing with this street-punk-lookin' mofo up there actually knowing WTF he was talkin' aboot, even with the scary rocket-propellant chemistry going on with these things. That was a hoot.

Isn't that how they drove the props on those amphibious landing craft? They were essentially a disposable vehicle meant to be used once... twice if the soldiers got really lucky. ;)

mnem
*munching on a celery stick cuz... no popcorn for me today*

Robert763:

--- Quote from: syau on October 18, 2021, 01:22:31 pm ---
--- Quote from: mnementh on October 18, 2021, 01:12:40 pm ---
--- Quote from: Ice-Tea on October 18, 2021, 08:47:38 am ---
Huh?  :wtf:

Opened up an original Fluke battery pack. Crusty as you might expect but... what's that?? Some yellow modling came off, looks suspiciously like a PTC resetable fuse. Might be part of the puzzle.
--- End quote ---
Hey... a Polyfuse buried in the cell pack. Who'd have thunk it...? ;)

Doing it this way serves three purposes:

One, it acts as a regular fuse in cases of short-circuit, albeit a pretty slow one.

Two, it somewhat acts as a thermal fuse; if the pack gets hot for any reason, tho usually from overcharging (or over discharging, in case of a circuit fault in the unit), the resistance of the Polyfuse increases, dropping charge/discharge current.

Three, it acts as OCP, both in charge and discharge modes. As charge or discharge current approaches its setpoint, it increases resistance, decreasing current flow to protect the unit and, in your case I'd suspect, the charging circuit.

Bet you a buck your aftermarket packs either omitted the Polyfuse, or substituted one of the wrong value or a cheap one that didn't work as it should.

I suggest having a talk with your supplier on those, but not until you've had a chance to do some forensic work on one of their packs that fried your expensive scopemeter.  :-+

mnem
:-BROKE

--- End quote ---

AFAIK, those R&S FSH3/6 Portable Spectrum Analysis use the same type of battery pack.

--- End quote ---

Yes they do.
They also use the same basic case, front panel controls and LCD.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version