Author Topic: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread  (Read 1944989 times)

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Offline Martin.M

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41600 on: October 22, 2019, 06:57:11 pm »
Bandwith 4.5kHz is now working, I have found the foul  :)

https://www.wellenkino.de/e108/test-2.mp4
 
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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41601 on: October 22, 2019, 07:10:07 pm »
so... tribal wisdom time

I've torn down the two Flukes. They appear to have come from two different locations. They are marked as the same rev (D) and there are no discernible layout or parts differences, but the main PCBs are rev A and rev N.

Fluke A (an 8840A/AF with an air force sn sticker) powers up, passes the self-test, has a transformer that looks like it cooked itself in the potting, and most of the switch functions are non-working or flaky. It does measure a 5.00 VDC supply correctly. There is rust on the external rivets, so it looked like it was stored in a damp place.  The display is bright. I haven't checked the PSU on this one yet.

Fluke B (an 8840A) has been stripped of parts... all of the socketed parts (microcontroller, UART, EPROM, etc), along with an IC used in a analog filter and a Fluke chip that provides DC scaling control logic.  It is much cleaner inside and out, the transformer is in good shape. All of the PSU voltages are in spec and there doesn't appear to be any problems (ripple) on any of the DC supplies.

I could go three ways on this...

Option A. Given that the power supply is working is working in Fluke A, I could move the socketed parts from Fluke A into Fluke B and see what happens. A search of the forums here suggests that may not work because the microcontroller programming is tied to the board rev but it doesn't sound like it will blow anything up.

Option B. I could check the Fluke B power supply to be sure it is in spec in spite of the apparent damage to the transformer. If it checks out, I could tear down Fluke B and see if the button problem is can be fixed by cleaning. Low probability of success, I think.

Option C. After checking the Fluke B PSU, I could try swapping the front panel from B into A. High PITA factor.

I am leaning toward Option A as that DMM is just in much better shape overall and this would be an easy fix. If I got the screen to light and it passed the self test, I could scavenge the control and filter ICs from the beatup Fluke.

Any opinions? Am I missing an obvious approach? Anyone torn one of these down and done this kind of repair?


You say the transformer looks cooked but its working OK, I think you will find that that some transformers had the yellow tape under the resin and others had brown tape, so I would suggest that its not cooked at all and is perfectly fine.

I personally would just swap over the front panels and then you will have a perfectly good meter albeit restricted to DC only because I didn't notice any indication on the back panels to show that they had the AC module installed.

The plot thickens, so I think I am going to move this project into a separate thread. When I sat down to the bench last night, the "working" Fluke started failing the self-test in a way that suggests a power supply problem but the power supply rails are all in spec.  I may try moving the controller chip set over to the other Fluke, just to see if the screen lights up and then figure out what to do next. 

sidenote: the AC measurement option was removed from both Flukes before I got my hands on them
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Offline Specmaster

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41602 on: October 22, 2019, 07:31:02 pm »
More calibrations. The next victim is the Fluke 8000A. When I joined our little group of TE misfits about 1.5 years go this was one of my first projects. This 8000A came to me with what I considered excessive drift when warming up. In looking over it's design it immediately became apparent that Fluke went cheap on the power supply. The +5V was unregulated. It consisted of a bridge rectifier and a capacitor. I installed another transformer with a 7805 regulator plus modified the +/- 15V supplies by pulling the zener/pass transistor combo and installing 7815/7915 regulators. The result was absolutely no drift and this 8000A has been a stellar performer.

The calibration was a breeze. Just the 190mV needed a minor tweak. (189.9mV). Everything else was dead nuts. Next on the list to get checked is the Tek 2465 DMM option.   



Meters like that are a breeze to do a calibration on as we know, but things get a little bit more tricky to do as the digits increase and even the slightest bit of noise on a circuit almost renders it impossible to get them dead nuts on to the 5th least significant digit  >:D |O but then as you rightly said about the 8000A, its been a stellar performer and do we really need to beyond 2 or 3 decimal places in 99.99% of all applications?

But then there is the extra bragging rights that come with the extra precision of pushing that out to 5,6 or more decimal places, 1 have 4 of 5.5 and 2 of 6.5 digit bench meters, not that I ever need those digits but I do love seeing them  :-DD :-DD
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Offline beanflying

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41603 on: October 23, 2019, 12:33:13 am »
PLA. I didn't think it would hold up this good. Going to leave it for another year and see what happens.  :-//
That's remarkable. Maybe the drought is actually helping as it's biodegradable. PLA usually isn't so resistant.

PLA isn't really any worse than any other plastic when it comes to UV based breakdown (more a colour fade issue than physical) and for it to be 'bio degradable' takes heat and moisture together over time. The issue really is the hearsay and urban type myths on PLA and not as much science as needed. PETG is still likely a better option for outdoor as it is tougher and a little flexible.

Angus's non science but practical tests below on a range of PLA.

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Offline beanflying

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41604 on: October 23, 2019, 12:44:07 am »
I have had Various Bridges on my evilbay list and then off again for a few years now. They are just a cool toy and nostalgic as we were made to use them in Secondary school in various forms. Do I need on absolutely not will I get on maybe  ;D

Speaking of un needed 'toys' my Heathkit 3121 Curve Tracer turned up this morning and given it may have been made from a kit by a butcher I popped the hood for a look. Seems to have been a little rework on the board along the way as there is two fairly distinct solder looks. Overall nothing scary. Socketed IC's and some 1% resistors in the mix and when I plugged it in no smokes were released.

Very tidy overall just the knobs have a little oxidation on the inserts so I might print or cut some new ones. To repaint it in @med TEK Blue or not when it gets mounted to the stand  :-//

Quaintly the seller included an entire CD with something on it but I will need to dig out the one PC I still own with a drive in it.

Looks like that version is just a cosmetic update of the IT-1121 which looks identical on the inside.
Mine didn't need anything doing other than both fuses replacing with the correct values.

David

I couldn't see any real difference externally or to the specs so possibly a board mod of some sort  :-//

Had a look at this evilbay listing and whatever was done was minor I guess eBay auction: #153692048823
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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41605 on: October 23, 2019, 04:12:46 am »
I have had Various Bridges on my evilbay list and then off again for a few years now. They are just a cool toy and nostalgic as we were made to use them in Secondary school in various forms. Do I need on absolutely not will I get on maybe  ;D

Speaking of un needed 'toys' my Heathkit 3121 Curve Tracer turned up this morning and given it may have been made from a kit by a butcher I popped the hood for a look. Seems to have been a little rework on the board along the way as there is two fairly distinct solder looks. Overall nothing scary. Socketed IC's and some 1% resistors in the mix and when I plugged it in no smokes were released.

Very tidy overall just the knobs have a little oxidation on the inserts so I might print or cut some new ones. To repaint it in @med TEK Blue or not when it gets mounted to the stand  :-//

Quaintly the seller included an entire CD with something on it but I will need to dig out the one PC I still own with a drive in it.

Looks like that version is just a cosmetic update of the IT-1121 which looks identical on the inside.
Mine didn't need anything doing other than both fuses replacing with the correct values.

David

I couldn't see any real difference externally or to the specs so possibly a board mod of some sort  :-//

Had a look at this evilbay listing and whatever was done was minor I guess eBay auction: #153692048823

I didn't realize the 1121 and the 3121 are the same box... only the color and the original price were different. I just dug up schematics for both to confirm that: no difference at all.  Which is too bad because I could have picked up a 1121 cheap at Rickreall, and would have had I known.  :-//

There was also a B+K 105A there, for 25USD, but I have one already, so I passed.
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Online Mr. Scram

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41606 on: October 23, 2019, 05:31:16 am »
PLA isn't really any worse than any other plastic when it comes to UV based breakdown (more a colour fade issue than physical) and for it to be 'bio degradable' takes heat and moisture together over time. The issue really is the hearsay and urban type myths on PLA and not as much science as needed. PETG is still likely a better option for outdoor as it is tougher and a little flexible.

Angus's non science but practical tests below on a range of PLA.


PLA going to shreds outside isn't really a myth as I've seen it happen aa shown in the video.
 

Offline beanflying

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41607 on: October 23, 2019, 05:39:36 am »
Did you actually listen to what was said and the different styles of PLA in use? The single wall vase mode print was dropped. Root growth alone would be enough to split a single wall so it is a dumb print.
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Online Mr. Scram

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41608 on: October 23, 2019, 06:07:06 am »
Did you actually listen to what was said and the different styles of PLA in use? The single wall vase mode print was dropped. Root growth alone would be enough to split a single wall so it is a dumb print.
I've seen PLA become brittle like in the video when printed in different shapes and left outside too.
 

Offline beanflying

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41609 on: October 23, 2019, 06:27:52 am »
Direct question DID YOU LISTEN to the content? Show me something else factual or real world based? Repeating I once saw X or heard Y therefore it must have been true and always will be is where the issue comes from. It is like the animated  :bullshit: from a week ago information based on non use or dated materials or equipment as 'evidence'.

The main failures or embritelment were a Algae infused one. No one uses Algae infused PLA and single wall is what it is. I have used it a bit for lamp shades but I wouldn't try and rely on it mechanically. It is basically paper.

The sculpted one was a 3D scan failure causing a void behind the panel that came off and that print was also dropped and clearly stated unknown if the cracking was caused by that or internal failure (sample size of one). The top of that print remained intact and as printed from what I could see and most likely had some sort of UV stabilizer in the PLA?

Colour changing happens on all plastics regardless of manufacturing method and it is not a failure specific to any method.

This as I stated initially the issue there is limited real world testing of the materials or process.
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Offline McBryce

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41610 on: October 23, 2019, 07:38:57 am »
It's no suprise that the plant pots cracked / faded / discoloured outside. ALL of our cheap plastic flower pots have cracked and faded and NONE of them were 3D printed or made of PLA. It's just what happens to plastic when it gets used outside (and filled with dirt), not the fact that they were 3D printed.

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Online bd139

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41611 on: October 23, 2019, 08:05:19 am »
Yep. Someone I know ended up in hospital for a couple of days when a plastic garden chain exploded and stabbed him up the arse. All plastics degrade.
 

Online med6753

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41612 on: October 23, 2019, 08:41:23 am »
Stumbled upon this.  ;D

We need similar one for tant magic smoke.  :-DD
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Online bd139

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41613 on: October 23, 2019, 08:51:44 am »
Ahh Lucas. Generator of much magic smoke. Found this the other day. Sort of related to TE as I'm sure we can all relate to it:

HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer is nowadays used as a kind of divining rod to locate expensive parts not far from the object we are trying to hit.

ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: Normally used for spinning steel Pop rivets in their holes until you die of old age, but it also works great for drilling mounting holes just above the brake line that goes to the rear wheel.

PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads.

HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

MOLE-GRIPS/ADJUSTABLE spanner: Used to round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETELENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your garage on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside a brake-drum you're trying to get the bearing race out of.

WHITWORTH SOCKETS: Once used for working on older cars and motorcycles, they are now used mainly for impersonating that 9/16 or 1/2 socket you've been searching for for the last 15 minutes.

DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, splattering it against that freshly painted part you were drying.

WIRE WHEEL: Cleans rust off old bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprint whorls in about the time it takes you to say, "F...."

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering car to the ground after you have installed your new front disk brake setup, trapping the jack handle firmly under the front wing.

EIGHT-FOOT LONG DOUGLAS FIR 2X4: Used for levering a car upward off a hydraulic jack.

TWEEZERS: A tool for removing wood splinters.

PHONE: Tool for calling your neighbour to see if he has another hydraulic floor jack.

SNAP-ON GASKET SCRAPER: Theoretically useful as a sandwich tool for spreading mayonnaise; used mainly for getting dog-doo off your boot.

BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR: A tool that snaps off in bolt holes and is ten times harder than any known drill bit.

TIMING LIGHT: A stroboscopic instrument for illuminating grease buildup.

TWO-TON HYDRAULIC ENGINE HOIST: A handy tool for testing the tensile strength of ground straps and brake lines you may have forgotten to disconnect.

CRAFTSMAN 1/2 x 16-INCH SCREWDRIVER: A large motor mount prying tool that inexplicably has an accurately machined screwdriver tip on the end without the handle.

AVIATION METAL SNIPS: See hacksaw.

INSPECTION LIGHT: The mechanic's own tanning booth. Sometimes called a drop light, it is a good source of vitamin D, "the sunshine vitamin," which is not otherwise found under cars at night. Health benefits aside, its main purpose is to consume 40-watt light bulbs at about the same rate as 105-mm howitzer shells during the Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat misleading.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the lids of old-style paper- and-tin oil cans and splash oil on your shirt; can also be used, as the name implies, to round off Phillips screw heads.

AIR COMPRESSOR: A machine that takes energy produced in a fossil-fuel burning power plant 200 miles away and transforms it into compressed air that travels by hose to a pneumatic impact spanner that grips rusty bolts last tightened 30 years ago by someone in Dagenham, and rounds them off.

PRY (CROW) BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 pence part.

HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to cut hoses 1/2 inch too short.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2019, 08:55:10 am by bd139 »
 
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Offline Terry01

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41614 on: October 23, 2019, 09:47:53 am »
Ahh Lucas. Generator of much magic smoke. Found this the other day. Sort of related to TE as I'm sure we can all relate to it:

HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer is nowadays used as a kind of divining rod to locate expensive parts not far from the object we are trying to hit.

ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: Normally used for spinning steel Pop rivets in their holes until you die of old age, but it also works great for drilling mounting holes just above the brake line that goes to the rear wheel.

PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads.

HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

MOLE-GRIPS/ADJUSTABLE spanner: Used to round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETELENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your garage on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside a brake-drum you're trying to get the bearing race out of.

WHITWORTH SOCKETS: Once used for working on older cars and motorcycles, they are now used mainly for impersonating that 9/16 or 1/2 socket you've been searching for for the last 15 minutes.

DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, splattering it against that freshly painted part you were drying.

WIRE WHEEL: Cleans rust off old bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprint whorls in about the time it takes you to say, "F...."

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering car to the ground after you have installed your new front disk brake setup, trapping the jack handle firmly under the front wing.

EIGHT-FOOT LONG DOUGLAS FIR 2X4: Used for levering a car upward off a hydraulic jack.

TWEEZERS: A tool for removing wood splinters.

PHONE: Tool for calling your neighbour to see if he has another hydraulic floor jack.

SNAP-ON GASKET SCRAPER: Theoretically useful as a sandwich tool for spreading mayonnaise; used mainly for getting dog-doo off your boot.

BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR: A tool that snaps off in bolt holes and is ten times harder than any known drill bit.

TIMING LIGHT: A stroboscopic instrument for illuminating grease buildup.

TWO-TON HYDRAULIC ENGINE HOIST: A handy tool for testing the tensile strength of ground straps and brake lines you may have forgotten to disconnect.

CRAFTSMAN 1/2 x 16-INCH SCREWDRIVER: A large motor mount prying tool that inexplicably has an accurately machined screwdriver tip on the end without the handle.

AVIATION METAL SNIPS: See hacksaw.

INSPECTION LIGHT: The mechanic's own tanning booth. Sometimes called a drop light, it is a good source of vitamin D, "the sunshine vitamin," which is not otherwise found under cars at night. Health benefits aside, its main purpose is to consume 40-watt light bulbs at about the same rate as 105-mm howitzer shells during the Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat misleading.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the lids of old-style paper- and-tin oil cans and splash oil on your shirt; can also be used, as the name implies, to round off Phillips screw heads.

AIR COMPRESSOR: A machine that takes energy produced in a fossil-fuel burning power plant 200 miles away and transforms it into compressed air that travels by hose to a pneumatic impact spanner that grips rusty bolts last tightened 30 years ago by someone in Dagenham, and rounds them off.

PRY (CROW) BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 pence part.

HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to cut hoses 1/2 inch too short.

 :-DD
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Offline VK5RC

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41615 on: October 23, 2019, 09:49:43 am »
BD I nearly wet myself laughing re those tools- I think I have ticked off the bucket list! ie I have done all of those things!
Whoah! Watch where that landed we might need it later.
 
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Online med6753

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41616 on: October 23, 2019, 10:18:18 am »
So true!  :-DD
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Offline Brumby

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41617 on: October 23, 2019, 10:55:17 am »
Never had the pleasure of the oxy torch myself .... but for the rest of it   ;D
 

Offline Specmaster

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41618 on: October 23, 2019, 11:02:07 am »
Ahh Lucas. Generator of much magic smoke. Found this the other day. Sort of related to TE as I'm sure we can all relate to it:

HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer is nowadays used as a kind of divining rod to locate expensive parts not far from the object we are trying to hit.

ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: Normally used for spinning steel Pop rivets in their holes until you die of old age, but it also works great for drilling mounting holes just above the brake line that goes to the rear wheel.

PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads.

HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

MOLE-GRIPS/ADJUSTABLE spanner: Used to round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETELENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your garage on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside a brake-drum you're trying to get the bearing race out of.

WHITWORTH SOCKETS: Once used for working on older cars and motorcycles, they are now used mainly for impersonating that 9/16 or 1/2 socket you've been searching for for the last 15 minutes.

DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, splattering it against that freshly painted part you were drying.

WIRE WHEEL: Cleans rust off old bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprint whorls in about the time it takes you to say, "F...."

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering car to the ground after you have installed your new front disk brake setup, trapping the jack handle firmly under the front wing.

EIGHT-FOOT LONG DOUGLAS FIR 2X4: Used for levering a car upward off a hydraulic jack.

TWEEZERS: A tool for removing wood splinters.

PHONE: Tool for calling your neighbour to see if he has another hydraulic floor jack.

SNAP-ON GASKET SCRAPER: Theoretically useful as a sandwich tool for spreading mayonnaise; used mainly for getting dog-doo off your boot.

BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR: A tool that snaps off in bolt holes and is ten times harder than any known drill bit.

TIMING LIGHT: A stroboscopic instrument for illuminating grease buildup.

TWO-TON HYDRAULIC ENGINE HOIST: A handy tool for testing the tensile strength of ground straps and brake lines you may have forgotten to disconnect.

CRAFTSMAN 1/2 x 16-INCH SCREWDRIVER: A large motor mount prying tool that inexplicably has an accurately machined screwdriver tip on the end without the handle.

AVIATION METAL SNIPS: See hacksaw.

INSPECTION LIGHT: The mechanic's own tanning booth. Sometimes called a drop light, it is a good source of vitamin D, "the sunshine vitamin," which is not otherwise found under cars at night. Health benefits aside, its main purpose is to consume 40-watt light bulbs at about the same rate as 105-mm howitzer shells during the Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat misleading.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the lids of old-style paper- and-tin oil cans and splash oil on your shirt; can also be used, as the name implies, to round off Phillips screw heads.

AIR COMPRESSOR: A machine that takes energy produced in a fossil-fuel burning power plant 200 miles away and transforms it into compressed air that travels by hose to a pneumatic impact spanner that grips rusty bolts last tightened 30 years ago by someone in Dagenham, and rounds them off.

PRY (CROW) BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 pence part.

HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to cut hoses 1/2 inch too short.

That is so funny and also happens to bloody true in most cases, especially the hacksaw  :-DD :-DD
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Offline beanflying

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41619 on: October 23, 2019, 11:13:11 am »
Tang through plain blade screwdriver generally unused but the electricians Chisel of choice. Pliers as a Hammer. So many multi purpose tools misused and abused by all of us I suspect  >:D
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Online bd139

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41620 on: October 23, 2019, 11:21:08 am »
My father used to call the hammer the "Irish screwdriver".  :-DD
 
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Online med6753

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41621 on: October 23, 2019, 11:40:02 am »
My father used to call the hammer the "Irish screwdriver".  :-DD

Hey, I resemble that remark.  :o :-DD
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Offline 0culus

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41622 on: October 23, 2019, 11:41:01 am »
Yep. Someone I know ended up in hospital for a couple of days when a plastic garden chain exploded and stabbed him up the arse. All plastics degrade.

“It was a million to one shot doc....million to one...”  :-DD
 

Online med6753

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41623 on: October 23, 2019, 11:43:01 am »
Yep. Someone I know ended up in hospital for a couple of days when a plastic garden chain exploded and stabbed him up the arse. All plastics degrade.

“It was a million to one shot doc....million to one...”  :-DD

At least it wasn't a gerbil. LMAO
An old gray beard with an attitude.
 

Offline GreyWoolfe

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Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Reply #41624 on: October 23, 2019, 12:03:51 pm »
Ahh Lucas. Generator of much magic smoke. Found this the other day. Sort of related to TE as I'm sure we can all relate to it:

HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer is nowadays used as a kind of divining rod to locate expensive parts not far from the object we are trying to hit.

ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: Normally used for spinning steel Pop rivets in their holes until you die of old age, but it also works great for drilling mounting holes just above the brake line that goes to the rear wheel.

PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads.

HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

MOLE-GRIPS/ADJUSTABLE spanner: Used to round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETELENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your garage on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside a brake-drum you're trying to get the bearing race out of.

WHITWORTH SOCKETS: Once used for working on older cars and motorcycles, they are now used mainly for impersonating that 9/16 or 1/2 socket you've been searching for for the last 15 minutes.

DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, splattering it against that freshly painted part you were drying.

WIRE WHEEL: Cleans rust off old bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprint whorls in about the time it takes you to say, "F...."

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering car to the ground after you have installed your new front disk brake setup, trapping the jack handle firmly under the front wing.

EIGHT-FOOT LONG DOUGLAS FIR 2X4: Used for levering a car upward off a hydraulic jack.

TWEEZERS: A tool for removing wood splinters.

PHONE: Tool for calling your neighbour to see if he has another hydraulic floor jack.

SNAP-ON GASKET SCRAPER: Theoretically useful as a sandwich tool for spreading mayonnaise; used mainly for getting dog-doo off your boot.

BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR: A tool that snaps off in bolt holes and is ten times harder than any known drill bit.

TIMING LIGHT: A stroboscopic instrument for illuminating grease buildup.

TWO-TON HYDRAULIC ENGINE HOIST: A handy tool for testing the tensile strength of ground straps and brake lines you may have forgotten to disconnect.

CRAFTSMAN 1/2 x 16-INCH SCREWDRIVER: A large motor mount prying tool that inexplicably has an accurately machined screwdriver tip on the end without the handle.

AVIATION METAL SNIPS: See hacksaw.

INSPECTION LIGHT: The mechanic's own tanning booth. Sometimes called a drop light, it is a good source of vitamin D, "the sunshine vitamin," which is not otherwise found under cars at night. Health benefits aside, its main purpose is to consume 40-watt light bulbs at about the same rate as 105-mm howitzer shells during the Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat misleading.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the lids of old-style paper- and-tin oil cans and splash oil on your shirt; can also be used, as the name implies, to round off Phillips screw heads.

AIR COMPRESSOR: A machine that takes energy produced in a fossil-fuel burning power plant 200 miles away and transforms it into compressed air that travels by hose to a pneumatic impact spanner that grips rusty bolts last tightened 30 years ago by someone in Dagenham, and rounds them off.

PRY (CROW) BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 pence part.

HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to cut hoses 1/2 inch too short.

Here's another one:
4 foot pipe--used on your socket wrench to break off lug nut studs.
That which doesn't kill you still requires a co-pay.
 


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